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: The ground-work and principal incidents of this superb exhibition, are borrowed by Mr. Fawcett, the artist, from Kotzebue's affecting drama of La Pérouse: but the immorality of the denoúment in the original has been judiciously omitted. "..

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ

EUROPEANS,
Pérouse ...........

......Mr. H. Johnston.
Madame Pérouse......... Mrs. H. Johnston.
Conge .......

....Mr. King.. Child ..

.... Miss Jenkins.
Champunzee .....

- Master Menagc.
NATIVES OF A NEIGHBOURING ISLAND.
Kango ....... ....... Mr. Farley..
Nagaski......

....Mr. Bologna. . Ostepalaw....

... Mr. Platt. . . , Tetasimar ..............Mr. L. Bologna. Potoomora ..........

Mr. Powers. Umba ................. Mrs. Mills. The scene lies in an uninhabited island, north of Japan. : The boldness of Kotzebue's imagination has represented the celebrated navigator, La Pérouse living in an island with a female savage, who had twice preserved him from destruction, and whom, hopeless of ever returning to his native country, he considers as his wife. Madame La Pérouse em -barks in one of the vessels dispatched for the discovery of her husband, and after a separation of nine years, finds him with his savage benefactress.

The various emotions produced in La Pérouse, and particularly in the women, are affecting in the extreme, but the conclusion, which left him in possession of two wives, has been omitted in the present piece. Several other alterations, in conformity to European manners and taste, are introduced, but the principal incidents and beauties of the original are preserved.

“ A dreary wood before me spread,

« The night was fast advancing, 6 And oft the gloomy bows between “ The rising moon by fits was seen,

“ A silver radiance glancing. “ Thus, whilst I slowly journey'd on,

$. Ne'er dreading aught of danger, “ No passing gale the branches stirr'd; “ I paus'd-when sure methought I heard

« The distant tread of stranger. ” Again I paus'd-'twas hush'd-anon

« The sound drew near-yet nearer “ Haply,” said I, “ some cheerful friend “ His lonely steps may hither bend

“ Nor cherish'd thought severer. « But ahl how were my hopes deceivid,

« When by the moon's pale lustre, Two vassals of the Earl I knew! 6 Stern were their looks--aside they drew

« Bchind a shady cluster. “ Naý, by our lady, Jacques !” cried one, ***My heart begins to fail me, .. “ For if, plague take the youth, say I, . « Beneath his blows I chance to die,

« Would thirty marks avail me?" o Repli'd'a second voice 'Tis well

6 You're past Earl Alric's hearing;' " Besides the sturdy strength of two . « Will sure a puny'lad outdo,

" What cause is there for learing :"). “ List’ning, with half suspended breath,

« Upon the spot I carried, “ Tių from behind a sudden blow, ". « Ah me! had well nigh laid me low, ..

“ But by my shield 'twas parried. << True to his charge, a second stroke. .

« Aim'd Jacques, ihe bravelier venturings « Not powerless now the lance recoil'd, " My better arm it sorely foil'd, .. .

“ Through the strong brassèt entering,

.

« Now, rising from the caitiff's blow, és

“ Mine eyes with rage beheld him; ..

A trusty rapier forth I drew, “ Upon the murderous suffian flew,

" And to the earth prone fell'd him.' " He groan'

d he died. His comrade soon “ Upon his steed far hasted, 66 Whilst I, as near my courser fed, Onithe soft grass reclin'd my head,

“ My strength with bleeding wasted." « Ere lóng an aged man approach'd,

“ His waving locks were hoary, « A secret prayer to Heav'n he sent, « With looks most piteous o'er me bent, i

“ And staunch'd the wound so gory. - « In his right hand a vase he held, . .

Of water from the fountain, « Then choicest simples he applied, “ Whose healing virtues oft he tried,

“ Cull'd on a neighbouring mountain. - “ Gradual I felt my sense revive,..

“ And from the ground rose slowly; « The hermit's cell not distant lay, « Thither we now pursu'd.our way,

" And reach'd the portal lowly. " When all his cares a secret love ...

“ Had to my breast imparted, “ I left, reluctant left, the cave, “ My blessings to its tenant gave,

“ And on my course departed. « 'Twere long to tell, what heavy toils, .

« Of grief, the various sources, " 'Twas mine, o Hubert! to withstand, “ And now, to rescue Holy Land,

"I join'd our monarch's forces. << 'Twere long to tell, how Saladin,

“ The leaguer'd walis defended, a « Till at the last the christian powers, ." * Waving the cross o’er Jaffa's towers, icon “ The ramparis heighis ascended...

Dd

6 A dreary wood before me spread,

" The night was fast advancing, « And ost the gloomy bows between « The rising moon by fits was seen,

• A silver radiance glancing. ". Thus, whilst I slowly journey'd on,

“ Ne'er dreading aught of danger, “ No passing gale the branches stirr'd; “ I paus'd—when sure methought I heard

“ The distant tread of stranger. " “ Again I paus'd—'twas hush'd-anon

“ The sound drew near-yet nearer “ Haply,” said I, “ some cheerful friend “ His lonely stéps may hither bend

“ Nor cherish'd thought severer. 6 But ahl how were my hopes deceivid,

« When by the moon's pale lustre, “ Two vassals of the Earl I knew! “ Stern were their looks aside they drew

" "Behind a shady cluster. “ Nay, by our lady, Jacques !” cried one, *My heart begins to fail me, .

“ For if, plague take the youth, say I, . « Beneath his blows I chance to die,

“ Would thirty marks avail me?" «« Repli'd'a second voice 'Tis well

" You're past Earl Alric's hearing; 66 Besides the sturdy strength of two 6 Will sure a puny lad outdo,

“ What cause is there for learing : : 6 List'ning, with half suspended breath,

« Upon the spot I carried, “ Tių from behind a sudden blow, “ Ah me! had well nigh laid me low,

“ But by my shield 'twas parried.. « True to his charge, a second stroke. .

" Aim'd Jacques, the bravelier venturing, “ Not powerless now the lance recoil'd, “ My better arm it sorely soil'd,

“ Through the strong brassét entering.

« Now, rising from the caitiff's blow, én

“ Mine eyes with rage beheld him; .. “ A trusty rapier forth I drew, « Upon the murderous ruffian few,

" And to the earth prone fellid him. ' " He groan'

dhe died. His comrade soon “ Upon his steed far hasted, 6 Whilst I, as near my courser fed, 106 On the soft grass reclin'd my head,

« My strength with bleeding wasted." “ Ere lóng an aged man approach'd,

" His waving locks were hoary, « A secret prayer to Heav'n he sent, « With looks most piteous o'er me bent, i

“ And staunch'd the wound so gory." - 16 In his right hand a vase he held, : :

" Of water from the fountain, « Then choicest simples he applied, Whose healing virtues oft he tried,

“ Cullid on a neighbouring mountain. • Gradual I felt my sense revive,

« And from the ground rose slowly; 6. The hermit's cell not distant lay, « Thither we now pursu’d.our way,

“ And reach'd the portal lowly. “ When all his cares a secret love .

“ Had to my breast imparted, “ I left, reluctant left, the cave, « My blessings to its tenant gave,

“ And on my course departed. *. 'Twere long to tell, what heavy toils, .!

16 Of grief, the various sources, " "Twas mine, O Hubert! to withstand, “ And now, to rescue Holy Land,

6 I join'd our monarch « 'Twere long to tell, how Saladin,

" The leaguer'd walls defended, « Till at the last the christian powers,

Waving the cross o'er Jaffa's towers, in “ The ramparts heighis ascended..

Dd

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