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dramatist, that having betted somewhat heavily on the success of one of his feeblest productions, he disguised himself in his servant's habiliments, and, mufiled up to the very nose, went into the pit of the Dublin theatre, where, after suffering a scene or two of his play to pass without remark or interruption, he gradually raised such a din of mingled yells and bisses, that the rest of the audience, actuated partly by a spirit of contradiction, and partly by a feeling of commiseration with the unknown author of the piece, got up on their side a still more violent hubbub of applause, which ovly ended, by causing the delighted dramatist to be triumphantly pelted out of the house, and in securing to the play, which would otherwise have been condemned as tame and spiritless, a successful career of thirty nights.

The application of this trifling anecdote may not, at first, appear so obvious, as to render it unnecessary to interpret the writing on the wall; but certain it is, that the conduct of Americans abroad, both as regards their efforts at self-degradation, and their vaunted want of sympathy for those political and social institutions at home, to which they owe their aggregate aggrandizement, as well as their individual prosperity, would seem at least to justify the reversion of the proverb, that all is not gold that glitters,' and to encourage the generous assumption, Qu'ils se reculer pour mieux suter.'

I am now at no loss to understand why it is, that out of so many hundreds of opulent Americans, who yearly traverse the Atlantic in pursuit of pleasure and excitement, so very few perform that voyage by way of Great Britain.

In London, social distinctions are so exquisitely drawn, and the threshold of titled exclusiveness is so unapproachable by the uninitiated, that before an American can obtain access to that sphere of enchantment, he would have to undergo a series of ordeals, as full of hazardous adventures as the hair-breadth 'scapes of those valiant knights, who, in the renowned era of chivalry, had manifold monsters to exterminate, enchantments to dissolve, and castles to demolish, ere they could attain the object promised by some benevolent fairy. Other circles there are, we have no doubt, where a more liberal state of feeling prevails, and where such Americans as are willing to violate their modesty, by resting their claims to hospitable attentions on their own intrinsic merits, might rely upon being received with approving smiles of familiarity and benevolence. The first of these circles is in itself a concentration of all that is most intellectual and high-minded among our aristocracy. In it, a ready facility in giving animation to social intercourse rarely fails to elevate even an unpedigreed stranger in the proudest estimation of its members. In it, fashion learns the value of wit, and wit requires the polish of fashion; plebeian talent attains refinement by constant communion with rank, and rank is taught the exercise of intellect from habitual contact with its humbler ally. The next circle, although not graced with highsounding names, does nevertheless possess a dignity and refinement of its own, so as to be frequently enlivened by that unfading festivity of mind, which places its members at an immeasurable distance from the heartless enjoyments and trifling pleasures of a more ordinary society.

And yet, notwithstanding these bright indications of a sympathizing

and appreciating spirit, there is a something in our social atmosphere which your thorough-going American gentleman can scarcely breathe without repugnance and mortification. The same emotions are sometimes felt by modest females, on joining a corps-de-ballet for the first time, although the faultless symmetry of their limbs might well justify the existence of a bolder feeling.

No person of royal lineage, travelling under the auspices of an humble cognomen, could eviuce more querulous sensitiveness on the subject of apprehended recognition, ihan I have seen several of these .genteel’Americans exhibit, while writhing under the infliction of those categorical inquiries, and incessant' harpings on my daughter,' in which it is the peculiar propensity of our national genius to indulge : and as among us this tone of impertinent inquisitiveness pervades all classes of society, to the utter discomfiture of those arts, behind which the timid and ihe bashful meritoriously seek to screen the solidity of their advantages, it is no wonder that American travellers, who are daily becoming proverbial for their magnanimous relinquishment of all importance borrowed from national greatness, should avoid sojourning among a race of people where these elevated sentiments, however enigmatical in themselves, are as little felt as they are understood.

Paris, therefore, being almost the only place where the incongruities of character and of conduct nerer lack toleration, becomes the most eligible point of attraction, where those sauntering Americans, who are too refined in their notions to follow the respectable vocations of their industrious parents, do yearly congregate : and no one can have resided long in that focus of noise and falsehood, of bollow joy and real sorrow, without having bad opportunities of remarking, at some time or other, with what amiable disinterestedness of feeling these listless sons of luxury strive to parry off, and render altogether abortive, every compliment which is directed either to their country, or to those men who have grown to eminence in her service. Even Niagara, I have heard described by native commentators in terms of actual detraction; and on several occasions, when I professed myself unable to understand how 30 many delicate shades of respectability, (the boast of all Americans on the continent,) could exist in the social organization of a community which owed its very existence, as a nation, to the promulgation and support of doctrines diametrically hostile to the assumption of social as well as political superiority, I was positively assured that there were circles so superfine in structure and complexion, that not even the President of the United States could obtain admission to them !

My views being thus enlarged by this invaluable supply of infor. mation, and my sensitive pride less apprehensive of offence, in contemplating exbibitions of republican equaliiy, austereness, and gloom, I resolved that my favorite scheme, of visiting these free and blessed realms, which had so long suffered from inanity and indecision, should be carried into operation immediately.

Well! - in spite of that prostrating feeling of melancholy, which is attached to quitting any place wherein we have long experienced familiar and habitual associations, there is nevertheless a no less strange,

fascinating, miserable delight, in calling at a stated hour to take final leave of our friends. The many expressions of regret at our departure; the reiterated hopes that our absence may not be long protracted; the oft-repeated promises that our name will ever remain registered in the faithful repository of some beloved creature's memory; are so soothing, and so gratifying to our vanity, that it is almost worth while to pass our lives in periodical desertions of home, country, and well-tried friends, in order frequently to task the cherished overflowings of the human heart. It is but too true, that the most solemn asseverations of friendship prove often as evanescent as the breath which gives them utterance; and that while you are fancying that the inward sigh of memory is arising in your favor, you are, de facto, serenely sliding away down the stream of oblivion. But then, as men and women are the mere types of human mutability, you should receive all that they profess on such occasions, as bearing the stamp and impress of truth ; and then endeavor not only to forget all and every thing, but to dream away the very consciousness of your former self. This is the truest way of applying the laws of philosophy to passing events, with judgment and

success.

Whether it was this felicitous process of thought which so completely revolutionized the tide of my feelings, on hearing our captain issue orders for weighing anchor, or that the extreme mobility of our nature, always yielding to present impressions, forces the mind into transitions at once sudden and complete, and renders us the mere dependants on geographical situations, I cannot tell; but this I know, that no sooner had I given myself up to reflection upon the greatness and majesty of that nature, which at sea more than any where else astonishes with her grandeur, and overwhelms us with her might, all the tumult and contention of this actual life faded into a rapidly. dying murmur behind me. It was certainly one of those nights which create a paradise of thought, transporting our every feeling to a true elysium of enjoyment; and if I could but have followed my imagination in that path of wonders, and clothed in simple, transparent language that succession of bright images which fluttered about me on that occasion; if I had possessed that mastery over expression, which alone can enable the poet to mould the inspirations of fancy into forms of loveliness and beauty, how many glorious creations would my teeming brain have produced! But as I belong to that maudlin race of sentimentalists, who can only feel without being able to explain, the influences acting on their minds, or to disclose those secrets which spring up from amid the great mysteries of their own souls, I shall spare myself the trouble of dabbling in the Castalian fount, and you the uncovetable distinction of being splashed with the result of my labors.

Sufřice it for you to know, that after the usual quota of adverse winds, and terrific hurricanes, during which the bravest appetites were destroyed, and the stoutest stomachs unhinged, we at last reached the land of Columbus, which a gratuitous solecism in nomenclature has caused to be miscalled America.

On disembarking at New York, I met with a little incident which

went far toward realizing all the wonders I had heard touching the alleged contempt of personal safety, which so proudly characterizes the Americans, when even life is set in base competition with property, or the hope of gain. As our packet had come up the river within two hundred rods of the first landing-place, I surrendered myself at discretion to the guidance of the most humane-looking individual I could discern, among a noisy crew of boatmen that had dropped alongside, and were now pestering every body on board ship with their vociferous offers of service. Scarcely had I squatted myself down upon the tattered garment, which the boatman had politely spread out for my especial comfort, than, with a dashing stroke of the oar, he darted off at a racing rate of speed, which the impulsive power of a steam engine could hardly have accelerated; but before we had proceeded more than half-way, a huge steamer, of the true trans-atlantic breed, and the largest I had ever beheld, with a migratory flock of half-starved dutchmen on board, gained so fearfully upon us, that finding the serene imperturbability of my companion was not likely to be disturbed by a less catastrophe than a complete immersion in the briny wave, I involuntary ventured to suggest to him the propriety of sneaking under the stern of a bulky ship, which lay at anchor near the wharf. "I guess I won't !' was the laconic reply ; and the next moment, the ambulatory volcano swept, roaring and splashing, so close by us, that for several seconds it was impossible to say whether our little vessel had been swamped altogether, or only partially flooded by the swell. Fortunately, the fates were satisfied with awarding to us no worse result than a severe drenching. Remonstrance would only have served to draw upon myself a volley of abuse and vituperation : leaving, therefore, this valiant son of freedom to the enjoyment of his own frothy conceits, I leaped on shore, comparatively improved in mind, if not in body, by this im. portant accession of knowledge and experience.

On receiving this somewhat tardy communication, you will no doubt inquire, in what fitful quarter is the moon, thus to have stirred me to the scribbling mood, after a pertinacious silence of so many months. The fact is, that I was unwilling to venture even a vaguo hypothesis on mere external indications of character; being well aware that when objects are imperfectly seen, they easily take forms from the imagination; and that unless we take time to analyze the passions by which the mind is agitated, and ascertain the reciprocal relation of its apparently inconsistent ideas, one is too apt, either to conjure up a splendid array of flattering exaggerations, and produce beau ideals of beauty and perfection, resembling those graceful sylphs of the air, the lovely creations of Westall ; or, like Fuseli

, to dip the brush in darker tints, and bring forth hideous monsters of deformity, whose prototypes, it is to be hoped, never existed, save in the wild, chaotic brain of that extravagant, though highly-gifted artist.

I have since discovered, however, that this punctilious observance of the rule is almost supererogatory; for, to judge from the avidity with which works containing incidents of scandal, colored with skill and address, and clothed in a style of vivacity and happy selfsatisfaction, are read in the fashionable community of New-York, by the gay and the grave, the wise, the sober, and the profound; the

professed lover of truth, and the skeptic; it would seem that the world is equally averse here, as it is elsewhere,

"To all the truth it sees or hears,

But swullows nonsense and a lie,
With greediness and gluttony.'

That ridicule, in this country, is more powerful than reason, may be gathered from this fact, that the brilliant conceptions of native genius have all but vanished from every boudoir and drawing-room, to make way for the imperishable productions of Pickwick,' or some elaborate lucubration on Animal Magnetism ; while the puerile common places of the ‘Journal,' and the soporiferous mixtures of Miss Martinean, have caused men entirely to forget that Stuart's judicious and dispassionate strictures on America ever had a local habitation and a name, among the things that be. He whose turn of mind inclines him to behold things in a ludicrous point of view, is alone sure to succeed in commanding attention; but if he have the art of making his readers suppose that it is not their own character, but that of their neighbors, to whom bis sarcasm refers, oh! then he may prepare his notes and additions ; for nothing can stem the impeluous career of his popularity. No wonder, therefore, that so many writers, should seize on all they can, with the blind, reckless grasp of the drowning, in utter violation of the sanctities of truth and decorum.

I have a series of sketches and episodes in store, which, if not so fertile in incident and character as those which our own metropolis affords, wiil at least, from their novelty, serve to beguile your leisure hours. My next may perhaps contain a slight sprinkling of such ; meanwhile, as you must be aware that my orbit is decidedly eccentric, you will not expect any thing like method, or consistency of narrative, in my descriptions; and should that interesting personage, called self, be found rising too often on the surface, or seeking to crowd the vacancy of expectation with too great a multitude of its own frigid couceits, you are also supplicated to remember, that my mind, having been almost entirely shaken from its equilibriun by this novel transition of scenes, will not be brought to attend assiduously to any thing but its own thoughts, or rather feelings, which constantly rise to the surface, whatever be the pursuit which actually occupies me; scattered and refracted in a thousand ways, but still retaining the same image, as the agitated waters insensibly produce the same reflection, however broken and disjointed.

ОмБР. А.

TIME's TELESCOPE.
Time's telescope more wonderful appears

E'en than his scythe, and deeper truths conveys;
His tube prospective lengthens days to years —

Reversed, our vears it shortens into days!
Then ponder well the substance, and the sum

Of what, unscanned, a contradiction seems;
Valued aright, compared with time to come,

Time past is but ihe wealth of him that dreams.

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