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opinion of this Assembly that our delegates at the Continental Congress should be instructed, and they are hereby instructed, to join with the other colonies in declaring the thirteen United Colonies a free and independent State, solemnly pledging our faith and honor that we will, on our parts, support the measure with our lives and fortunes; and that in consequence thereof, they, the Continental Congress, on whose wisdom, fidelity, and integrity we rely, may enter into and form such alliances as they may judge most conducive to the present safety and future advantage of these American colonies ; provided, the regulation of our internal police be under the direction of our own Assembly Entered according to the original. Att:- NOAH EMERY,

Clk. D. Reps.

PREPARATION FOR ANOTHER CONVENTION.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

December 27, 1777.

Voted, that it be recommended to the several towns, parishes, and places in this State, if they see fit, to instruct their representatives at the next session to appoint and call a full and free representation of all the people in this State, to meet in convention at such time and place as shall be appointed by the General Assembly, for the sole purpose of framing and laying a permanent plan or system for the future government of this State.

There is no record that this vote was received and acted on by the Council.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

February 20, 1778. Voted, That this house resolve themselves into a committee of the whole to join the honorable board, if they see fit, to consider of the confederation formed by the honorable the Continental Congress, and also of the calling a full and free representation of all the people of this State, for the sole purpose of forming a permanent plan or system for the future government of this State.

FEBRUARY 25, 1778. According to order of the day, the committee of both houses being met in the assembly chamber to consider of the matter and manner of calling a full and free representation of all the people in this State, for the sole purpose of forming and laying a permanent plan or system for the future government of this State,

The Honorable Meshech Weare, Esq., in the chair, proceeded to consider of the matters to them referred, and after some time spent thereon, the committee agreed to report that a full and free representation of all the people of this State be called as soon as conveniently may be for said purpose.

That the convention be on the second Wednesday in June next ; that they meet at Concord in this State.

That each town, parish, or precinct sending a member or members to said convention pay their own members for their time and expense.

That when the said convention have formed such plan of government they lay the same before their constituents for their approbation before the same shall take effect; that such plan shall not take effect until three quarters of the people of this State shall consent thereto. The committee then adjourned to 3 o'clock f. M.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH, P. M. The committee met according to adjournment, and proceeded to the business to them referred, and after some time spent thereon, agree further to report that the foregoing articles of direction be not recommendatory, but directory; and that precepts issue to each town, parish, and district in this State, if they see fit, to send one or more members to the said convention, saving to any two or more towns, parishes, or districts, if they see fit, to join together in electing and sending one member to represent them in said convention.

The committee then dissolved, and the speaker resumed the chair, and the above report being read and considered, voted that the same be received and accepted.

IN COUNCIL, MARCH 4, 1778. Vote to accept the report of the committee of both houses for calling a convention to meet at Concord to form a new system of government brought up, read, and concurred.

Second Constitutional Convention 1778.-This convention met in accordance with the foregoing vote at Concord, the second Wednesday in June, 1778. - Meshech Weare was chosen president and Ebenezer Thompson, secretary.” The constitution proposed was signed by John Langdon, Pres. P. T.

No copy of the journal of this convention is known to be in existence. Mr. G. Parker Lyon compiled from town records a list of the delegates. From this list it seems that about ninety towns were represented by seventy-four delegates. Among the more prominent members were John Langdon, of Portsmouth; Nathaniel Folsom and John Pickering, of Exeter ; Matthew Thornton, of Londonderry; John Dudley, of Raymond; John McClary, of Epsom; Timothy Walker, of Concord; Joseph Badger, of Gilmanton ; Timothy Farrar, of New Ipswich; and John Bell, of Londonderry.

“ 1779, June 5th, this Convention completed a Constitution, chose a committee (Col. Thornton and Col. Bartlett), 'to get this Constitution printed, and transmit two or more copies of the same to each and every town, to which precepts were sent, and publish the same in the New Hampshire newspapers.' Returns were ordered to be made, of the number of voters present at such meeting, and how many voted for receiving said plan, and how many for rejecting the same, unto this Convention at Concord, in this State, on the third Tuesday in September next.'” The constitution thus proposed was signed by John Langdon, Pres. pro tem, and E. Thompson, Sec.

This convention reassembled at Concord on the day above named, examined the votes, and found the result a total rejection of the new-formed constitution; and the convention dissolved themselves from any further proceedings in the formation of a constitution.* The following was the plan of government submitted to the people by this convention and rejected :

*The above facts are gleaned from the town papers, v. 9, and from the New Hampshire Register for 1852.

A DECLARATION OF RIGHTS

AND PLAN OF GOVERNMENT FOR THE STATE OF

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Whereas, by the tyrannical administration of the government of the king and parliament of Great Britain, this State of New Hampshire, with the other United States of America, have been necessitated to reject the British government, and declare themselves independent States; all which is more largely set forth by the Continental Congress in their resolution or declaration of the fourth of July, A. D., 1776 ;

And, whereas, it is recommended by the said Continental Congress to each and every of the said United States, to establish a form of government most conducive to the welfare thereof;

We, the delegates of the said State of New Hampshire, chosen for the purpose of forming a permanent plan of government, subject to the revisal of our constituents, have composed the following declaration of rights and plan of government, and recommend the same to our constituents for their approbation :

A DECLARATION OF THE RIGHTS OF THE

PEOPLE OF THE

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE.

First. We declare that we, the people of the State of New Hampshire, are free and independent of the crown of Great Britain.

Secondly. We, the people of this State, are entitled to life, liberty, and property, and all other immunities and privileges which we heretofore enjoyed.

Thirdly. The common and statute laws of England, adopted and used here, and the laws of this State (not inconsistent with said Declaration of Independence) now

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