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to all men, and among others to Kings; nor that power is liable to be abused wherever it is lodged, and more in the hands of those, who from their situation are exposed to stronger, and more numerous temptations than others; especially when they happen to be under fewer restraints to keep them within proper bounds. Whether, when tyrannical attempts are made against the freedom of the people, any other motive besides this general one ought to be sought for, must depend upon the circumstances, under which they are made ; Mr. Fox thinks it unnecessary, in the case of James, to make any further inquiry, but Mr. Rose, conceives the Tory writers have discovered another motive, and has entered with more zeal than success, into the lists to defend them,

Principles and expressions of sive to

In the introduction to this Work we ventured to Mr. Rose offen- predict that principles more exceptionable, and ex

pressions more offensive to royalty would be found in Mr. Rose's Observations, than in any part of Mr. Fox's Historical Work, and the concluding half sentence of the section may be produced to prove the fulfilment of the prediction. For there we find Mr. Rose boasting that it is the pride and happiness of the subjects of the British en:pire to reflect, that the energy of the constitutional principles of our Government, and the natural love of liberty in the country occasioned tyrannical

Rosc, p. 122.

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attempts, against the freedom of the people to terminate in the ruin of the prince, and in the more firm esta** blishment of the rights of the subject.” Where are the principles concerning monarchy developed in Mr. Fox's book, at which any person avowing these principles may be supposed to feel alarm? Let Mr. Fox express his disapprobation of the execution of Charles the First, though the manner of conducting his trial was less exceptionable, than the proceedings against Lord Strafford-Let him declare his admiration of the talents of Cromwell, and his contempt of the baseness of Monk-Let him state, that legislative provisions may be overpowered by the ambition of a Monarch, and the subserviency of his ministers-Let him charge Charles the Second with concealing a treaty from some of his ministers—and let him attribute to Kings in common with all other men a natural love of power, and to their situation unavoidable temptations to abuse it; yet after all, he has manifested no disposition to exult over the ruin of a Prince, or make it his pride and happiness to contemplate the triumph of liberty, when attended by such a sacrifice.

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