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Eittenhouse, commissioners on the part of the colonies of New- TITLE 1
York and Pennsylvania, for the purpose of marking the
beginning of the forty-third degree of north latitude; then
down along said Delaware river to a point opposite to the fork
or branch formed by the junction of the stream called
Mahackama^k with the said Delaware river, in the latitude of
forty-one degrees twenty-one minutes and thirty-seven seconds
north; then in a straight line to the termination, on the east
bank of the Delaware river, of a line run in the year one
thousand seven hundred and seventy-four, by William Wick- [63]
ham and Samuel Gale, commissioners on the part of the then
colony of New-York, and John Stevens and Walter Ruther-
ford, commissioners on the part of the then colony of New-
Jersey; then along said line to a rock on the west side of
Hudson's river, in the latitude of forty-one degrees north,
marked by said commissioners; then southerly along the west
shore, at low water mark, of Hudson's river, of the Kill Van
Kull, of the sound between Staten Island and New-Jersey, ,
and of Rariton Bay, to Sandy Hook; and then to the place of
beginning, in such manner as to include Staten Island, and
the islands of meadow on the west side thereof, Shooter's
Island, Long Island, the Isle of Wight, now called Gardiner's-
Island, Fisher's Island, Shelter Island, Plumb Island, Robin's
Island, Ram Island, the Gull Islands, and all the islands and
waters in the bay of New-York, and within the bounds above
described.

(Son.)—In 1834 the boundary line between New-York and New-Jersey was established. See
Laws of 1834, p. a

TITLE II.

OF THE SOVEREIGNTY AND JURISDICTION OF THE STATE.

Sec. L To what places they extend.

2. Duty of governor and subordinate officers to defend them.

3. Governor to employ counsel to defend suits.

i. District attorney to report to governor persons intruding upon lands. 5. Such persons to be removed by sheriff.

g 1. The sovereignty and jurisdiction of this state extend Extent, to all the places within the boundaries thereof, as declared in the preceding Title; but the extent of such jmisdiction over places that have been or may be ceded to the United States, shall be qualified by the terms of such cession.

Compiled from documents in the office of the secretary of state.

§ 2. It shall be the duty of the governor, and of all the To be main, subordinate officers of the state, to maintain and defend its tamed" sovereignty and jurisdiction.

Founded on 1 B. L., 12Y; lb., 238; and Laws of 1819, p. 302.

§ 3. If any suit shall be instituted against this state, or snitstobe against any person deriving title therefrom, to recover any defendealands within this state, under pretence of any claim inconsistent with its sovereignty and jurisdiction, the governor, at

the expense of this state, shall employ counsel and provide for the defence of such suit.

Founded on 1 R. L., 127; lb., 238; and Laws of 1819, p. 302.

on'Tu'bii" ^ ^ an^ Pei>son' under such pretence, shall intrude upon faliS". 1C any of the waste or ungranted lands of this state, it shall be the duty of the district attorney of the county, immediately to report the same to the governor, who shall, thereupon, by a written order, direct the sheriff of the county to remove from said lands the person so intruding.

Founded on 1 R. L., 127; lb., 238; and Laws of 1819, p. 302.

Dnty6^? § 5. The sheriff shall execute such order; and in case of sheriff. resistance made or threatened, he may call to his aid the

power of the county, as in cases of resistance to the writs of

the people.

TITLE III.

OF THE PLACES CEDED TO THE UNITED STATES.

[A particular description of these places, as well those enumerated In the Revised Statutes, as those since ceded will be fouud In a subsequent volume.]

CHAP. II.

Of the Civil Divisions of the State.

(Took effect 1 January, 1830.)

Of the several counties of the state.
Of the senate districts.
Of the congress districts.
Of the several towns of this state.
Of the several cities in this state.

General provisions concerning the erection and alteration
of counties, &c.

TITLE I.

OF THE SEVERAL COUNTLES OF THE STATE.

Section 1. The state shall be divided into fifty-six counties, called Suffolk, Queens, Kings, Eichniond, New-York, Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Uockland, Orange, Ulster, Sullivan, Delaware, Greene, Columbia, Albany, Eensselaer, Schoharie, Schenectady, Saratoga, Montgomery, Hamilton, Washington, Warren, Essex, Clinton, Franklin, St. Lawrence, Herkimer, Oneida, Madison, Oswego, Lewis, Jefferson, Otsego, Chenango, Broome, Cortland, Tompkins, Tioga, Steuben, Onondaga, Cayuga, Seneca, Ontario, Yates, Wayne, Livingston, Monroe, Genesee, Orleans, Niagara, Erie, Allegany, Cattaraugus and Chautauque.

[The residue of this. Title, containing the boundaries of the counties above enumerated, and of the counties of Chemung, Fulton. Schuyler and Wyoming (erected since the Revised Statutes were enacted,) will be found in a subsequent volume.]

Title 1.—
Title 2.
Title 3.—
Title 4. —
Title 5.—
Title 6. —

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TITLE II.

OP THE SENATE DISTRICTS.

Sic. 1. Division of the state into eight senate districts.

2. Districts to be altered at the lirst session after every census.

3. To consist of contiguous territory and of whole counties.

[The whole arrangement of senate districts being altered under the constitution of 1846, the fir&t section of this title is omitted.]

g 2. At the first session after the return of every enumera- when and tion to be made of the inhabitants of the state, the senate howaUered districts are to be so altered by the legislature, that each district shall contain, as nearly as may be, an equal number of inhabitants, excluding aliens, paupers, and persons of colour not taxed.

§ 3. Each senate district is required at all times to consist Territory, of contiguous territory; and no county can be divided in the formation of a senate district.

IITLE III.

OF THE CONGRESS DISTRICTS.

[The arrangement of congress districts as existing in 1862, renders It useless to publish this title.]

TITLE IV.

OF THE SEVERAD TOWNS IN THIS STATE.

[Thi« title contains a description of each town in the state, and some general provisions concerning the boundary ines between towns. It will be published in a subsequent volume.]

TITLE V.

OF THE SEVERAL CITIES OF THIS STATE.

[This title contains the boundaries of the several cities in this state and of their respective wards. It will also be pnblished in a subsequent volume.]

TITLE VI.

GENERAL PROVISIONS CONCERNING THE ERECTION AND ALTER-
ATION OF COUNTIES, CITIES, VILLAGES AND TOWNS.

Sec. 1. Applicants for new counties, cities or villages, or the alteration of their bounds,
to publish notice and furnish a map,

2. Map to be verified by the oath of the surveyor.

3. If application granted, map to be filed with surveyor-general.

4. Applicants for new towns, or alterations or divisions of towns, to affix notice. 6. Notice to be read at town meeting.

6. Surveys and maps to be furnished.

§ 1. All persons intending to apply to the legislature for 9«^» «gthe erection of a new county, or for the incorporation of a city puoMn»hnoor village; or for any alteration of the bounds of any county, nish map. city, or village, shall cause notice to be published of such [sn intended application, as required by law; and shall also procure an accurate survey and map of the territory described in such application.

See chap, vii, 1st part of R. S., tiLe 3, sec. 1.

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Map how § 2. Such survey and map shall be duly verified by the vended. . Q^jj 0f ^ue surveyor making the same; and shall be laid

before the legislature, before any such application shall be

acted on.

whereflicd. g 3. In case any law shall be passed by the legislature, pursuant to such application, the aforesaid survey and map shall be filed in the office of the surveyor-general of this state.

Notice or g 4. No town in this state shall be divided or altered in its tfonato bounds, nor shall any new town be erected, without an Ac, where application to the legislature by the inhabitants of such town aaixed. go |-0 oe divided or altered, or of the several towns out of which such new town is to be erected, or some of them; and notice hi writing of such intended application, subscribed by at least five persons resident and freeholders in such town or towns shall be affixed on the outer door of the house where the next town-meeting is to be held in each of the towns to be affected thereby, at least ten days previous to the town meeting in each of those towns. To be read g 5. A copy of such notice shall also be read at the town mertingB. meeting of every town to be affected thereby, to the electors there assembled, by the clerk of the town, immediately before proceeding to the election of town officers. Map and g G. The persons applying for the division or alteration of survey. ^Q bounds of any tow n, or for the erection' of a new town, shall also procure such survey and map as is required hi the first section of this title, which shall be laid before the legislature, and filed with the surveyor-general, as above provided.

This title is taken chiefly from 1 R. L., p. 269, § 2, and 2 K. L., 135, § 25.

CHAP. III.

Of the Census or Enumeration of the Inhabitants of the

State.

[By ch. 140, Laws of 1845, this chapter was repealed, and new regulations for taking the census adopted: but the new law, not being muue a part of the Revised Statutes, it is not inserted in this place."]

m CHAP. IV.

Of the Rights of the Citizens and Inhabitants of this State.

(Took effect 1 January, 1830.)

Seo. 1. All authority derived from the people.

2. Taxes, how levied.

3. Right to keep arms.

4. When citizens may be compelled to perform military service.
6. Certain persons to bo excused from service.

6. Quartering of soldiers.

7. Rights of citizens secured.

8. Trial by jury preserved; new courts to proceed according to the common law.

Sec. 9. Religious worship to be free. CHAP. t.

10. The writ of habeas corpus not to be suspended.

11. Search warrants regulated.

12. Accusations for criminal offences, how to be made.

13. Proceedings in criminal cases, and the private right of property.

14. Rights of persons accused of crimes.

15. Justice to be speedily administered, and process to be granted to all persons.

16. Fines to be reasonable and proportioned to the offence.

17. Excessive bail not to be required, nor unusual punishments inflicted. IS. Elections to be free; no one to be disturbed in voting.

19. Right of petitioning declared.

20. Liberty of speech and of the press declared.

21. Truth to be given in evidence in prosecutions for libels, and jury to determine

both law and fact.

Section 1. ~No authority can, on any pretence whatsoever, Ah anthoribe exercised over the citizens of this state, but such as is or &m thf1 shall be derived from and granted by the people of this state. Pe°P'e

1E.L, 47, § 1.

§ 2. No tax, duty, aid or imposition whatsover, except such £*?f£how as may be laid by a law of the United States, can be taken or levied within this state, without the grant and assent of the people of this state, by their representatives in senate and assembly; and no citizen of this state can be by any means • compelled to contribute to any gift, loan, tax, or other like charge, not laid or imposed by a law of the United States, or by the legislature of this state.

1 R. L., 48, § 12.

§ 3. A well regulated militia being necessary to the security Right to of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear amis ketp arm9' cannot be infringed.

2d amendt. cons. TJ. S.

§ 4. No citizen of this state can be constrained to arm Military himself, or to go out of this state, or to find soldiers or men CnrSsby of arms, either horsemen or footmen, without the grant and assent of the people of this state, by their representatives in [93] senate and assembly, except in tlfe cases specially provided for by the constitution of the United States.

1 R. L., 48, § 12.

g 5. All such inhabitants of this state of any religious de- whotobe nomination whatever, as from scruples of conscience may be eiC08edaverse to bearing arms, are to be excused therefrom by paying to the state an equivalent in money; and the legislature is required to provide by law for the collection of such equivalent, to be estimated according to the expense, in time and money, of an ordinary able-bodied militia-man.

§ 6. No soldier can in time of peace be quartered in any Qj{|i^lns house, without the consent of the owner; nor in time of war, but in a manner to be prescribed by law.

1 R. L, 48, § 13; 3d amendt. to eons. U. S.

S 7. No member of this state can be disfranchised, or de- ^gbts^ prived of any of the rights or privileges secured to any citizen Bccure

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