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Rovised Statutes may be printed.

AN ACT relative to the printing of the Revised

Statutes.

Passed April 19, 1830. The People of the State of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:

$ 1. Any person or persons residing in the state of NewYork may print and publish the whole or any part of the

Revised Statutes of this state; but to entitle any copy of a law Certificate so published to be read in evidence, there shall be contained of staterary in the same book or pamphlet a printed certificate of the

secretary of state, or of two of the Revisers, that such copy is a correct transcript of the text of the Revised Statutes, as published, except such typographical errors in the original as may be corrected in such copy, and except such parts as shall have been altered by acts of the legislature; and that with respect to such parts it conforms to the acts by which such

alterations shall have been made. Paging to

$ 2. The editions to be printed under the provisions of this act shall be paged in conformity to the first edition published under the authority of this state.

of secretary

be preserved.

REVISED STATUTES

[61]

OF THE

STATE OF NEW YORK.

PART I.

AN ACT concerning the territorial limits and divi

sions, the civil polity, and the internal administration of this State. WHEREAS it is expedient that the several statutes of this state, relating to its territorial limits and divisions, its civil polity, and its internal administration, should be consolidated and arranged in appropriate chapters, titles and articles; that the language thereof should be simplified; and that omissions and other defects should be supplied and amended: Therefore,

The People of the State of New-York, represented in Senate and Assembly, do declare and enact as follows:

CHAP. I.
Of the Boundaries of the State and its Territorial Juris-

diction.

(Took effect 1 January, 1830.)
TITLE 1. – Of the boundaries of the State.
TITLE 2. — Of the sovereignty and jurisdiction of the State.
TITLE 3.- Of the places ceded to the United States.

TITLE 1.

Preamble.

Eastern.

TITLE I.
OF THE BOUNDARIES OF THE STATE.
SEC. 1. Description of the boundaries of the state.

SECTION 1. It being deemed useful for the information of the citizens and officers of this state, that its boundaries, so far as its jurisdiction is now asserted, should be declared, it is

therefore declared, that the state of New-York is bounded as Boundaries. follows: Beginning at Lyon's point in the mouth of a brook (621 or river called Byram river, where it falls into Long-Island

Sound, and running thence up along said river to a rock at the ancient road or wading place in said river, which rock bears north twelve degrees and forty-five minutes east, five hundred and fifty rods from said point; then north twentythree degrees and forty-five minutes west, two thousand two hundred and ninety-two rods; then east-north-east thirteen miles and sixty-four rods, which lines were established in the year one thousand seven hundred and twenty-five, by Francis Harrison, Cadwallader Colden, and Isaac Hicks, commissioners on the part of the then province of New York, and Jonathan Law, Samuel Eells, Roger Wolcott, John Copp, and Edmund Lewis, commissioners on the part of the then colony of Connecticut, and were run as the magnetic needle then pointed: then along an east-north-east continuation of the last mentioned course, one mile three-quarters of a mile and twenty-one rods to a monument erected in the year one thousand seven hundred and thirty-one, by Cadwallader Colden, Gilbert Willet, Vincent Matthews, and Jacobus Bruyn junior, commissioners on the part of said province, and Samuel Eells, Roger Wolcott and Edmund Lewis, commissioners on the part of said colony; which said monument is at the southeast corner of a tract, known and distinguished as the oblong or equivalent lands; then north twenty-four degrees and thirty minutes west, until intersected by a line run by said last mentioned commissioners on a course south twelve degrees and thirty minutes west, from a monument erected by them in the south bounds of Massachusetts; which monument stands in a valley in the Taghkanick moun·tains, one hundred and twenty-one rods eastward from a heap of stones, in said bounds on the top or ridge of the most westerly of said mountains; then north twelve degrees and thirty minutes east, from a monument, erected by said last mentioned commissioners at said place of intersection and standing on the north side of a hill south-easterly from the eastermost end of the long pond, along the aforesaid line to the aforesaid monument erected in the south bounds of Massachusetts, being the north-east corner of the oblong; then west nine degrees south along the north bounds of the oblong, one mile three-quarters of a mile twenty-one rods and five links, to a monument erected by said commissioners at the northwest corner of the oblong, and at the distance of twenty

TITLE 1.

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miles from Hudson's river; which four last mentioned lines were established by said last mentioned commissioners, and were run by them as the magnetic needle pointed in the year one thousand seven hundred and thirty-one; then north fifteen degrees twelve minutes and nine seconds east, along the line established in the year one thousand seven hundred and eightyseven, by Thomas Hutchins, John Ewing, and David Rittenhouse, commissioners appointed by the United States in congress assembled, fifty miles forty-one chains and seventynine links, to a red or black oak tree marked by said commissioners, which said line was run by said last mentioned commissioners as the magnetic needle pointed in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven; then north eightytwo degrees and twenty minutes west, as the magnetic needle pointed in the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, fifty chains to a monument erected for the south-west corner of the state of Vermont, by Smith Thompson, Simeon De Witt and George Tibbits, commissioners on the part of this state, and Joseph Beeman junior, Henry Olin and Joel Pratt second, commissioners on the part of the state of Vermont, which monument stands on the brow of a high hill, descending to the west; then northerly in a straight line to a point which is distant ten chains, on a course south thirty-five degrees west, from the most westerly corner of a lot of land distinguished in the records of the town of Pownal, in the state of Vermont, as the fifth division of the right of Gamaliel Wallace, and which in the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, was owned and occupied by Abraham Vosburgh; then north thirty-five degrees east, to said corner, and along the westerly bounds of said lot, thirty chains to a place on the westerly bank of Hosick river, where a hemlock tree heretofore stood, noticed in said records as the most northerly corner of said lot; then north one degree and twenty minutes west, six chains to a monument erected by the said commissioners, standing on the westerly side of Hosick river on the north side of the highway leading out of Hosick into Pownal, and near the north-westerly corner of the bridge crossing said river; then north twenty-seven degrees and twenty minutes east, thirty chains through the bed of the said river, to a large roundish rock on the north-easterly bank thereof; then north twenty-five degrees west, sixteen chains and seventy links; then north nine degrees west, eighteen chains and sixty links to a white oak tree at the south-west corner of the land occupied in one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, by Thomas Wilsey; then north eleven degrees east, seventy-seven chains to the north side of a highway, where it is met by a fence dividing the possession of said Thomas Wilsey junior, and Emery Hunt; then north forty-six degrees east, six chains; then south sixty-six degrees east, twenty-six chains and twenty-five links; then north nine degrees east, twentyseven chains and fifty links, to a blue slate stone anciently set

indisonise des degree at the chit bi

TITLE 1.

[64]

Northern.

up for the south-west corner of Bennington; then north seven
degrees and thirty minutes east, forty-six miles forty-three
chains and fifty links to a bunch of hornbeam saplings on the
south bank of Poultney river, the northernmost of which was
marked by said last mentioned commissioners, and from which
a large butternut tree bears north seventy degrees west, thirty
links, a large hard maple tree south two chains and eighty-six
links, and a white ash tree on the north side of said river, north
seventy-seven degrees east; which said several lines from the
monument erected for the south-west corner of the state of
Vermont, were established by said last mentioned commis-
sioners, and were run by them as the magnetic needle pointed
in the year one thousand eight hundred and fourteen; then
down the said Poultney river through the deepest channel
thereof, to East Bay; then through the middle of the deepest
channel of East Bay and the waters thereof, to where the same
communicate with Lake Champlain; then through the middle
of the deepest channel of Lake Champlain to the eastward of
the islands called the Four Brothers, and the westward of the
islands called the Grand Isle and Long Isle, or the two Heroes,
and to the westward of the Isle-La-Mott, to the line in the
forty-fifth degree of north latitude, established by treaty for
the boundary line between the United States and the British
dominions; then west along said line to the river St. Lawrence;
then along the line established by the commissioners appointed
under the sixth article of the treaty of Ghent, into and up the
said river St. Lawrence to the waters of Lake Ontario; then
along the said line through the waters of said lake and of the
Niagara river to the waters of Lake Erie; then westerly
through the same, and along the said line, until intersected by
a meridian line drawn through the most westerly bent or
inclination of Lake Ontario; then south along said meridian
line to a monument in the beginning of the forty-third degree
of north latitude, erected in the year one thousand seven
hundred and eighty-seven, by Abraham Hardenburgh and
William W. Morris, commissioners on the part of this state,
and Andrew Ellicott and Andrew Porter, commissioners on the
part of the state of Pennsylvania, for the purpose of marking
the termination of the line of jurisdiction between this state
and the said state of Pennsylvania; then east along the line
established and marked by said last mentioned commissioners
to the ninetieth milestone in the same parallel of latitude,
erected in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-
six, by James Olinton and Simeon De Witt, commissioners on
the part of this state, and Andrew Ellicott, commissioner on
the part of Pennsylvania, which said ninetieth milestone
stands on the western side of the south branch of the Tioga
river; then east along the line established and marked by said
last mentioned commissioners, to a stone erected in the year
one thousand seven hundred and seventy-four on a small
island in the Delaware river, by Samuel Holland and David

Western.

Southern.

the velinton a and

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