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Brown
Goodwin Lincoln

Shepardson White
Bryant
Gray
Macdonald Shlivek

Wilson
Butler
Haines

MacGregor Smith TK Winters
Cheney
Hammond Murray

Stivers

Yale
Coffey
Hart
Nolan

Sullivan Yeomans
Colné
Higgins
Pappert
Sweet

Young
Connell
Hinman

62 Daniel D. Frisbie having received a majority of all the votes cast, the Clerk declared him duly elected Speaker of the Assembly of 1911, and appointed Messrs. A. E. Smith and Merritt a committee to conduct the Speaker-elect to the Chair.

Mr. Speaker, on taking the Chair, addressed the House as follows:

Gentlemen of the Assembly:

I am deeply sensible of the high honor which comes to a citizen of the State of New York who is chosen by his associates to fill the office of Speaker of the Assembly. Called to this responsible position by your kind partiality and by the unanimous action of my party associates, I assure you of my sincere and deep appreciation.

I shall endeavor to justify your confidence by an impartial, just and upright discharge of the duties of presiding officer to the end that the rights of each individual member may be preserved and that justice may be done the people of each district in the State through their chosen representatives.

To accomplish this result I shall need and earnestly solicit your cordial support and co-operation in the discharge of the difficult and trying duties which cluster around the Speakership.

We meet under unusual conditions. As the result of a most emphatic expression of the popular will, the Democratic party has been entrusted with power in every branch of the State government. With power comes responsibility. It is our duty to accept the share of responsibility which comes to us as a coordinate branch of the Legislature and to so shape legislation as to redeem the solemn pledges made to the people by the enactment of wise and just laws, the correction of abuses and the modification of such laws as are odious and burdensome to the people.

This I interpret to mean the enactment of a primary law that shall give every voter an opportunity to cast his vote for his chosen candidate and assure the honest count of that vote, with an opportunity to appeal to the courts for the redress of any wrongs. It means the passage of a law providing for direct nomination of candidates for public office which shall be Statewide in its application.

ASSEMBLY JOURNAL.] 2

It means the adoption by the State of New York through its Legislature of the constitutional amendment providing for the election of United States senators by direct vote of the people, in order that those chosen to that powerful position may be more responsive to the will of the people.

It means the adoption of the amendment to the Federal constitution permitting the national government to levy an income tax, whenever the exigencies of the nation may require it.

It means that the strictest economy shall be exercised in the expenditure of the public revenues, that unnecessary offices and expenses shall be abolished, that the State shall receive a dollar's worth for every dollar expended, that no new scheme calling for an expenditure of money shall be sanctioned until present undertaking are completed and that no more money shall be appropriated than State has in prospective revenues for any given year. A contrary policy, prevailing for regra brought the taxpayers of the State during the last session face to face with a direct State tax.

Agriculture being the source of wealth and its products being the necessaries of life, should be fostered by friendly legislation and as liberal appropriations as the financial condition of the State warrants.

This great interest is menaced by a large number of abandoned farms and a small average yield of products per acre. These serious conditions must be met if New York is to retain her place among the leading agricultural States of the Union. The State Agricultural College and the several agricultural schools should be maintained, in order that improved scientific methods may be taught the younger generation of farmers.

The State is expending a vast sum of money in the construction of the barge canal and the retiring Governor has indicated that a divided responsibility is detrimental to its speedy completion and tends to las business methods. If legislation is needed to simplify and improve the work of administration, we should enact measures which will work a reform.

The State is engaged in the construction of a system of modern highways, which when completed will confer a vast benefit upon the farming and commercial interests of the State. It is, therefore, important that their construction be hastened as rapidly as is consistent with substantial and lasting improvement.

IIome rule has long been the shibboleth of the party now in control. Let us now grant to the cities of our State such laws as will give the municipalities real, practical and reasonable control of their local affairs, so long denied by an unfriendly majority.

Too many drastic laws have been enacted in recent vears tending to harass, annoy and retard the development of the business interests of the State. The time has come to give business a rest. Fewer laws and better enforcement are needed. Our attitude should be such as will tend to restore public confidence and hasten the return of widely diffused prosperity.

The investigating committees appointed at the last session of the Legislature will submit their reports in due season, and I commend to your careful consideration the facts established, to the end that such remedial legislation as is needed may be enacted.

The chief executive of our State in his personality and announced policy truly represents the intelligent and patriotic sentiment of the State. It is our duty to uphold and support his policies, to act in harmony with him, that his administration may meet the just expectations of the people.

I pledge to you the active co-operation of your Speaker that the present session may prove notable in the State's history for honest, economical and progressive legislation, in order that the aspirations of our citizens, irrespective of party, for better government may be realized,

Let us demonstrate that the party now in control is, in the present generation, capable of constructive statesmanship of the same high order as that of the fathers.

Let us fulfill every pledge made to the people and they will continue to trust us.

Mr. Miller offered for the consideration of the Ilouse a resolution, in the words following:

Resolved, That the House do now proceed to the election of Clerk; that the roll of members be called by the Clerk, and that each member, as his name is called, rise in his place and openly name his choice for such office.

Mr. Speaker put the question whether the IIouse would agree to said resolution, and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Speaker directed the Clerk to call the roll, when each member, as his name was called, nominated as follows:

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FOR RAY B. SMITH.
Adler
Constantine Hoff

Parker JS Talmage
Ahern
Cross
Jones
Phillips CW

Thorn
Allen
DeLano
Keys
Phillips JS

Ward
Baumes
Ebbetts
Kopp
Pierce

Waring
Brereton Filley

Lansing
Shannon

Waters F A
Brooks
Goodman Lent

Shea

Waters RB
Brown
Goodwin
Lincoln

Shepardson White
Bryant
Gray
Macdonald Shlivek

Wilson
Butler
Haines

MacGregor Smith TK Winters
Cheney
Hammond Merritt

Stivers

Yale
Coffey
Hart
Murray
Sullivan

Yeomans
Colné
Higgins
Nolan
Sweet

Young
Connell
Hinman
Pappert

63
Luke McHenry having received a majority of all the votes cast,
Mr. Speaker declared Luke McHenry duly elected Clerk of the
Assembly for 1911.

Mr. Speaker administered the oath of office to Luke Wellenry, Clerk-elect.

Mr. Patrie offered for the consideration of the llouse a resolution, in the words following:

Resolved, That Lee F. Betts be and be hereby is elected Sergeant-at-Arms of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. Ward moved to amend said resolution by striking out the name of Lee F. Betts and inserting the name of Ward T. Clute.

Mr. Speaker put the question whether the House would agree to said motion of Mr. Ward, and it was determined in the negative.

Mr. Speaker then put the question whether the House would agree to said resolution, and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Speaker declared Lee F. Betts duly elected Sergeant-atArms of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. Sheide offered for the consideration of the House a resolution, in the words following:

Resolved, That Joseph Hurley be and he hereby is elected principal doorkeeper of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. llinman moved to amend said resolution by striking out the name of Joseph Hurley and inserting the name of Andrew Kean.

Jr. Speaker put the question whether the IIouse would agree to said motion of Mr. Ilinman, and it was determined in the negative.

Mr. Speaker then put the question whether the House would agree to said resolution, and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Speaker declared Joseph Hurley duly elected principal dou rkeeper of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. Coughlin offered for the consideration of the House a resolution, in the words following.

Resolved, That Edward Bourne be and he hereby is elected first assistant doorkeeper of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. J. S. Parker moved to amend said resolution by striking out the name of Edward Bourne and inserting the name of D. C. Easton.

Mr. Speaker put the question whether the House would agree to said motion of Mr. J. S. Parker, and it was determined in the negative.

Mr. Speaker then put the question whether the House would agree to said resolution, and it was determined in the affirmative.

Mr. Speaker declared Edward Bourne duly electeil first assistant doorkeeper of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. Wende offered for the consideration of the House a resolution, in the words following:

Resolved, That Edward Murphy be and he hereby is elected second assistant doorkeeper of the Assembly for the session of 1911.

Mr. Sweet moved to amend said resolution by striking out the name of Edward Murphy and inserting the name of Russell Quonce.

Mr. Speaker put the question whether the House would agree to said motion of Mr. Sweet, and it was determined in the negative.

Mr. Speaker then put the question whether the House would agree to said resolution, and it was determined in the affirmative.

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