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gestions which the legally constituted guardians of the Church had made, in vain had they expressed their readiness to accept the already over-loaded Bill, even with the addition of further restrictions to any extent which did not render it impracticable as a measure of relief. Bigotry again successfully gnashed her teeth, and by a majority of four proxies the Bill was rejected in the Upper House without going into a detailed examination of its provisions.

Such is the history of this measure, and we are much mistaken if every man of common candour will not readily admit the absence of indirect views in the course which Unitarians bave pursued on this subject, and that they have kept their eye steadily fixed on their grievance, evincing a sincere desire to obtain its redress with the least possible sacrifice of the general system of law. That the frequent discussions of the subject must have opened the eyes of many to the impolicy of blending functions purely civil with the religious duties of the Clergy of the Establishment, we can readily believe; and we sincerely hope that Nonconformists in general will, ere long, be completely emancipated from any necessity of coming into contact with a body, too many of whose members express contempt for every thing relating to Dissenters, save their money.

We must not omit to notice the remedy suggested by the Presbyter in the place of the measures hitherto proposed. “It is this : that we should acknowledge the validity of marriage contracts, entered into before a civil magistrate, according to certain forms prescribed by Act of Parliament.” Wiih respect to the plan itself, if there be any thing remarkable, it is not its novelty in the abstract, but that it is founded upon a distinction which, how. ever evident, so many politicians in and out of the Church contrive to overlook. That the marriage contract stands high in the scale of religious as well as moral obligations, we are most forward to admit; but from this admission, to argue the duty of the State, as such, to prescribe a religious ceremonial, is as absurd as it would be to contend for the interposition of a religious rite in every important contract between man and man, because its violation would be an offence against religious principle. With the desultory and not very perspicuous historical discussion into which our author enters, and his distinctions between the sufficiency of a contract in foro civili and one in foro conscientia, (from which an uncharitable critic might infer, that a Churchman's conscience is not to be bound by the former,) and between “the extreme of Popery, which improperly has made matrimony a sacrament,” and the more accurate and well-defined notion of our Protestant Church, which only considers it “as a holy estate entered into by a religious ordinance,” we have no concern farther than to observe, that the Presbyter perpetually confounds the very distinguishable ideas of “religious ordinance” and “religious obligation,” like a Churchman of ancient breed. We feel obliged to him for introducing to more extended notice the act of the Protectorate, alias the Grand Rebellion, for regulating the solemnization of marriage and the registration of marriages, births, and burials, which we concur with him in hoping may be found useful in supplying hints.” That it would better comport with the dignity of the Establishment to permit its minisiers to act as mere registrars of the acts of a lay-magistrate, (as the Presbyter suggests,) than that ihey should be the functionaries for receiving as well as recording the vows of the married parties, (as Lord Liverpool recommended,) we are utterly at a loss to understand; but we are not much in the dark as to the motive for wishing the banns to be proclaimed in the market-place, and higher fces to be imposed upon licences in London:

and large towns. Yet our author exceedingly disdains the idea of persecuting error indirectly, and appears to lament that “our different acts of toleration have been too often granted, not upon any broad principle, but from mere motives of expediency." (P. 27.)

We understand that the Committee of Civil Rights has determined to revert, in a great degree, to the simplicity of the original proposition, and to present a Bill authorizing the parties to appear before the parish minister in the church or vestry, at his option, and after contracting marriage in the solemn and expressive form prescribed by the act of the Commonwealth, so as to avoid the most distant pretence of interfering with the Liturgy, to have the marriage registered upon payment of the usual fees. Banns and licences to continue upon the footing of the general law. That the Bill so altered will please all parties in the Church, past experience forbids us to hope; but recent events justify the expectation that Unitarians, with an admitted grievance, will not be again thrust out of parliament upon a series of inconsistent and ill-disguised pretences, that their Bill is too comprehensive, or too partial —that it provides too little or too much for religious celebration – that it asks the established priest to mutilate his forms, or that it sets up a rival body of religious officers-or, to crown the whole, that the petitioners are, by the common law, aliens from civil as well as religious privilege, and, therefore, ought to be compelled to bend the knee to the God of Trinitarians.

CRITICAL NOTICES.

Art. V.-Les Jésuites Modernes, 8c. secrets, which would have been songht

Modern Jesuits. By the Abbé in vain from a faithful adherent to the Martial Marcet de la Roche-Ar- Company of Jesus. His book has obnaud. 8vo. pp. 200. Paris, 1826.

tained a most rapid and exteusive circu

lation ; and it forms one, if not the prinThe revival of the order of the Jesuits cipal, of those works which led to the in Frauce under the restoied dynasty of late famous project for restraining the the Bourbons, has produced a very pow- liberty of the press in France, which its erful sensation in the public mind. sage authors have lately beeu compelled Their insidious and arbitrary proceed to abandou. In an address to the reader ings, countenanced as they are under the Abbé gives a short view of the prestood to be by the court and the minis. scut coustitution of the Society of Je. try, hare been viewed with serious alarm suits, specifying the principal officers, and by a large portion of the enlightened describing their functions. The Chief is population, and the press has teemed called the General, who is deemed amewith publications which were intended pable only to Jesus Christ or to the to weaken or subvert their influence by Pope. The next in rank are his assistexposing their principles, and holding ants, who have the charge of provinces, out their practices to general contempt and divide among them all the countries and abhorrence. Among the works of of the earth. Next follows the Provinthis class the “Modern Jesuits" of the ciul, who is the chief of a province, and, Abbé de la Roche-Arvaud has attained like the General, has his council, conpre-eminent celebrity. The author is a sisting of his Secretary-General, Procuyoung ecclesiastic, who may be consi. rator General, &c. Every college has its dered in some respects as a spy in the Rector, who is sometimes styled the enemy's camp He had mixed much Master- Father, having also his council of with the society, but whether with a assistants under different denominations. view of becoming a member does not Every house has besides its Prefect in spiappear; and be avails himself of the ritual things, to whom alone the members knowledge he had acquired to rereal of the society are to make confession,

gestions which the legally constituted guardians of the Church had made, in vain had they expressed their readiness to accept the already over-loaded Bill, even with the addition of further restrictions to any extent which did not render it impracticable as a measure of relief. Bigotry again successfully gnashed her teeth, and by a majority of four proxies the Bill was rejected in the Upper House without going into a detailed examination of its provisions.

Such is the history of this measure, and we are much mistaken if every man of common candour will not readily admit the absence of indirect views in the course which Unitarians bave pursued on this subject, and that they have kept their eye steadily fixed on their grievance, evincing a sincere desire to obtain its redress with the least possible sacrifice of the general system of law. That the frequent discussions of the subject must have opened the eyes of many to the impolicy of blending functions purely civil with the religious duties of the Clergy of the Establishment, we can readily believe ; and we sincerely hope that Nonconformists in general will, ere long, be completely emancipated from any necessity of coming into contact with a body, too many of whose members express contempt for every thing relating to Dissenters, save their money.

We must not omit to notice the remedy suggested by the Presbyter in the place of the measures hitherto proposed. “It is this: that we should acknowledge the validity of marriage contracts, entered into before a civil magistrate, according to certain forms prescribed by Act of Parliament." Wiih respect to the plan itself, if there be any thing remarkable, it is not its novelty in the abstract, but that it is founded upon a distinction which, however evident, so many politicians in and out of the Church contrive to overlook. That the marriage contract stands high in the scale of religious as well as moral obligations, we are most forward to admit; but from this admission, to argue the duty of the State, as such, to prescribe a religious ceremonial, is as absurd as it would be to contend for the interposition of a religious rite in every important contract between man and man, because its violation would be an offence against religious principle. With the desultory and not very perspicuous historical discussion into which our author enters, and his distinctions between the sufficiency of a contract in foro cirili and one in foro conscientia, (from which an uncharitable critic might infer, that a Churchman's conscience is not to be bound by the former,) and between “ the extreme of Popery, which improperly has made matrimony a sacrament,” and the more accurate and well-defined notion of our Protestant Church, which only considers it “ as a holy estate entered into by a religious ordinance,” we have no concern farther than to observe, that the Presbyter perpetually confounds the very distinguishable ideas of “religious ordinance” and “ religious obligation,” like a Churchman of ancient breed. We feel obliged to him for introducing to more extended notice the act of the Protectorate, alias the Grand Rebellion, for regulating the solemnization of marriage and the registration of marriages, Lirths, and burials, which we concur with him in hoping “ may be found useful in supplying bints.” That it would better comport with the dignity of the Establishment to permit its ministers to act as mere registrars of the acts of a lay-magistrate, (as the Presbyter suggests,) than that they should be the functionaries for receiving as well as recording the vows of the married parties, (as Lord Liverpool recommended,) we are utterly at a loss to understand; but we are not much in the dark as to the motive for wishing the banns to be proclaimed in the market-place, and higher fees to be imposed upon licences in London

and large towns. Yet our author exceedingly disdains the idea of persecuting error indirectly, and appears to lament that “our different acts of toleration have been too often granted, not upon any broad principle, but from mere motives of expediency." (P. 27.)

We understand that the Committee of Civil Rights has determined to revert, in a great degree, to the simplicity of the original proposition, and to present a Bill authorizing the parties to appear before the parish minister in the church or vestry, at his option, and after contracting marriage in the solemn and expressive form prescribed by the act of the Commonwealth, so as to avoid the most distant pretence of interfering with the Liturgy, to have the marriage registered upon payment of the usual fees. Banns and licences to continue upon the footing

of the general law. That the Bill so altered will please all parties in the Church, past experience forbids us to hope; but recent events justify the expectation that Unitarians, with an admitted grievance, will not be again thrust out of parliament upon a series of inconsistent and ill-disguised pretences, that their Bill is too comprehensive, or too partial—that provides too little or too much for religious celebration – that it asks the established priest to mutilate his forms, or that it sets up a rival body of religious officers-or, to crown the whole, that the petitioners are, by the common law, aliens from civil as well as religious privilege, and, therefore, ought to be compelled to bend the knee to the God of Trinitarians.

CRITICAL NOTICES.

Art. V.- Les Jésuites Modernes, fc. secrets, which would have been songht

Modern Jesuits. By the Abbé in vain from a faithful adherent to the Martial Marcet de la Roche-Ar- Company of Jesus. His book has obnaud. 8vo. pp. 200. Paris, 1826.

tained a most rapid and extensive cireu

lation ; and it fornis one, if not the privThe revival of the order of the Jesuits cipal, of those works which led to the in Frauce under the restored dynasty of late famous project for restraining the the Bourbons, has produced a very pow- liberty of the press in France, which its erful sensation in the public miud. sage authors have lately been compelled Their insidious and arbitrary proceed to abandou. In an address to the reader ings, countenanced as they are under the Abbé gives a short view of the prestood to be by the court and the minis- sent constitution of the Society of Je. try, have been viewed with serious alarm suits, specifying the principal officers, and by a large portion of the enlightened describing their functions. The Chief is population, and the press has teemed called the General, who is deemed anewith publications which were intended pable only to Jesus Christ or to the to weaken or subvert their influence by Pope. The next in rank are his assistexposing their principles, and holding ants, who have the charge of provinces, out their practices to general contempt and divide among them all the countries and abhorrence. Among the works of of the earth. Next follows the Provinthis class the “Modern Jesuits" of the cial, who is the chief of a province, and, Abbé de la Roche-Arnaud has attained like the General, has his council, conpre-eminent celebrity. The author is a sisting of his Secretary-General, Procuyoung ecclesiastic, who may be consi- rator General, &c. Every college has its dered in some respects as a spy in the Rector, who is sometimes styled the enemy's camp.

He had mixed much Master- Father, having also his council of with the society, but whether with a assistants under different denominations, view of becoming a member does not Every house has besides its Prefect in spiappear; and he avails himself of the ritual things, to whom alone the members knowledge he had acquired to reveal of the society are to make confession,

nets.

touches that way were found in the noté to have been inclined to announce their book which by chance escaped the fire. possession of a deposit so important to I have heard him speak much of the the church and so creditable to themimportance of that controversy; and he selves, it is discovered first among the was so far a prophet as to declare he Gnostic heretics, who in the affectation thought that heresy would soon break of a superior knowledge of divine things out and insult Christianity itself. I do had corrupted the simplicity of the gospel not remember he discovered any dispo- with many inventions, which required sition to attack the Papists or sectaries, some other sanction than the authority though he had considered them well; of the Scriptures. It was then adopted but he might think there were labourers from them by two Fathers of the Church, enough at that oar."

(Irenæus and Tertullian,) but only to “ And he had a dread lest this little repel the arguments of those who had notebook, of which I have given an ac first pleaded against the Scriptures a count, might happen to stray and fall into spurious tradition, and had then so falunknown persons' hands, who possibly sified the records of Christianity as to might misconstrue his meaniug. In con embarrass any inference from their ge. templation of which contingent, he wrote nuine communications. When this use upon it this pleasant imprecation : 'I had been made of the argument, it seems beshrew his heart, that gathers my opi. to have been felt that such an appeal was nion from any thing he finds wrote here."" incongruous and unnecessary, for it was

immediately abandoued by the church; Art. VII.—An Historical View of the

por does it appear to have been resumed Plea of Tradition as maintained by either party for the support of their te.

in the great controversy of Arianism by the Church of Rome. By George

After an interruption of almost Miller, D. D. 8vo. London.

two centuries and a half among the Tais tract arises out of that contro western Christians, and in Greece of the versy between the Catholic and Protes- much longer period of more than five tant Churches into which the discussion ceuturies and a half, we again find traof the political questions between them dition pleaded as an authority ; but in has, as we think, most unfortunately and each case for a practice, not for a docinjuriously deviatec'. Dr. Miller's de- trine; each practice also plaiuly consign of investigating the plea of tradition demned by the writteu word. The arguin favour of doctrines and practices, as a ment was then abandoned, and each question of history, is one which at any plea disowned by one of the two church. other time would be felt by all to be es, until the very crisis of the Reformauseful and interesting. At present, it is tion, when it was once more brought too obviously directed towards increase forward to oppose the appeal which the ing the current of popular odium against Reformers had made to the Scriptures ; a class of persons labouring under pro- and as these reformers bad objected to scription for opinions' sake; and, little doctrines, not less than to practices, the disposed as we must be to view with any tradition of the church was then, for the sort of favour the doctrines or discipline first time, pleaded in favour of doctrines. of the Roman Church, we cannot say Even then, however, in the very agony that, considering the temporal injustice of the papal power, it was not plealed dealt out to its adherents, we are iu- that the Scripture was not intelligible clined to view controversial attacks as without the aid of tradition, the latter likely to do much good either to friends being represented only as entitled to or enemies.

equal reverence, and not as a superior Dr. Miller's book, however, will have and controlling anthority for divine its value, and we extract his summary of truth. This last step was takep about the history of the argument drawn from the close of the sixteenth century, by tradition, which we believe to be in the Cardinal Bellarmine, who in his too main correct:

candid defence of the Church of Rome, “ Such appears to have been the his- did not hesitate to maintain that the tory of that tradition which is now main- gospel without unwritten tradition is an tained by Roman Catholics in Ireland, empty name, or words without sevse. as ivdispensably necessary to the just The Roman Catholics of Ireland, imi. interpretation of the sacred writings. tating the boldness of the Cardiual, hare Apparently unknown to the apostolic declared that the Scriptures are not infathers, who might naturally be supposed telligible without the aid of traditiou."

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