The Voices that Are Gone: Themes in Nineteenth-Century American Popular Song

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Oxford University Press, 3.07.1997 г. - 367 страници
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In this unique and readable study, Jon Finson views the mores and values of nineteenth-century Americans as they appear in their popular songs. The author sets forth lyricists' and composers' notions of courtship, technology, death, African Americans, Native Americans, and European ethnicity by grouping songs topically. He goes on to explore the interaction between musical style and lyrics within each topic. The lyrics and changing musical styles present a vivid portrait of nineteenth-century America. The composers discussed in the book range from Henry Russell ("Woodman, Spare That Tree"), Stephen Foster ("Oh! Susanna"), and Dan Emmett ("I Wish I Was in Dixie's Land"), to George M. Cohan and Maude Nugent ("Sweet Rosie O'Grady"), and Gussie Lord Davis ("In the Baggage Coach Ahead"). Readers will recognize songs like "Pop Goes the Weasel," "The Yellow Rose of Texas," "The Fountain in the Park," "After the Ball," "A Bicycle Built for Two," and many others which gain significance by being placed in the larger context of American history.

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Съдържание

PART II
157
Illustrations
176
References
315
Index of Song Titles
323
Index of Names
330
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Страница 57 - Father, dear father, come home with me now ! The clock in the steeple strikes two ; The night has grown colder — and Benny is worse—- But he has been calling for you.
Страница 15 - A weary lot is thine, fair maid, A weary lot is thine ! To pull the thorn thy brow to braid, And press the rue for wine ! A lightsome eye, a soldier's mien, A feather of the blue, A doublet of the Lincoln green, — No more of me you knew, My love ! No more of me you knew. "This morn is merry June, I trow, The rose is budding fain ;* But she shall bloom in winter snow, Ere we two meet again.
Страница 144 - Daisy, Daisy, Give me your answer do! I'm half crazy all for the love of you! It won't be a stylish marriage, I can't afford a carriage, But you'll look sweet upon the seat Of a bicycle built for two!
Страница 124 - Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord; He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored; He has loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword; His truth is marching on.
Страница 114 - I LOVE it, I love it ; and who shall dare To chide me for loving that old Arm-chair? I've treasured it long as a sainted prize ; I've bedewed it with tears, and embalmed it with sighs 'Tis bound by a thousand bands to my heart ; Not a tie will break, not a link will start. Would ye learn the spell ? — a mother sat there ; And a sacred thing is that old Arm-chair.
Страница 115 - She told me shame would never betide, With truth for my creed and God for my guide ; She taught me to lisp my earliest prayer, As I knelt beside that old arm-chair.
Страница 14 - shows gallanter still; 'Tis the blue vault of heaven, with its crescent so pale, And with all its bright spangles!
Страница 165 - Behold, then, the unlettered man of the West, the nursling of the wilds, the farmer of the Hermitage, little versed in books, unconnected by science...

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