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PAN would not have been a god under certain circumstances,
PHILOSOPHERS, the great things they are to accomplish according to Mill,

The want of common sense among many of them,
PIG, the, a great enemy to snakes,

How it fights the rattlesnake,
PLATO, his prayer to Pan,

On future punishment,
PLINY, the Consul, on the contemplation of death, .
PLUTARCH on the idea of kissing a Pagan emperor's foot,

On the pleasant associations connected with the religion of Pagans,

On the existence of God,
PONS ASINORUM, the, of the Gipsy question,
PROTESTANTS, the religion of, .

The power they have to encounter in Romanism,
PSALMIST, THE, on the mysteries of his being,

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QUAKERS, how they keep themselves distinct from others,
QUINTILIAN on the existence of God,

On the education of youth,
On common sense, and premature intellectual efforts,

162, 167

79
88
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RABBIT, the American, does not burrow,
REES' CYCLOPÆDIA on the rattlesnake swallowing her young,

26
RITUALISTS in the English Church,

51, n58
ROEBUCK, Mill's quarrel with,.

96
ROMANISM :—The natural adherence of mankind to the religion of their an-
cestors,

49
Though springing from Christianity, a religion of corrupt human nature, 49
The way in which it is taught by the Church and its priests,

49
The difficulties of Romanists shaking off the system,

50
In what it consists,
The absolute belief and submission of its devotees,

50
The dignity and power of the priesthood,

50
Their worldly position, .

51
The miracles of the Apostles not attempted by the priests,

53
The fountain for the washing away of sins claimed by a priest,

53
The scorn of St. Peter when refusing money to confer a Christian grace,
He commands people to pray to God for forgiveness, and raises Corne-
lius from the ground, .

54
Refusal of divine honours by St. Paul,

54
The kissing of the Pope's foot,

54
The worship of the “saints” and of their “relics,"

54
The foundation of the Church,

54
Peter as a foundation,

54
His character,

54
The aversion of Romanists to hear the Greek Church mentioned, .

55
The Pope should be required to “prove his pedigree" on a variety of
subjects,

55

54

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ROMANISM - The natural perpetuation of a religion that has been established, 56

A scepticism that is common among Romanists, .
The rearing of priests,
Sceptical and atheistical priests,

57
The light in which priests regard themselves and those around them,

57
The confessional generally,
Peculiarities of priests,
The power of the priests of modern and ancient Rome compared, 59
The absolute belief of Romanists under any circumstances,

60
Christianity originated in a civilized age, and is based on facts,

60
The fight between it and Paganism,

61
A coalition formed,

61
Romanism borrowed most of its peculiarities from Paganism,

61
Romanism not Christianity,

61
The despotism of its priesthood,

61, n64
The historical foundation on which Romanism rests,

n6I
The foundation of corrupt Christianity like that of a human religion, 62
Both can maintain themselves in the world, .

62
The gradual growth of Romanism and the powers claimed by it, . 62
Romanism as a power which Protestantism has to combat,

62
Sincere and nominal Romanists,

63
The sincerity of the priests,
The peculiar training of Roman priests,

65, ngo
The influence of the Romanist system over its votaries, .

65
Its effects resemble, in some respects, those of the goddess Diana, 65
The belief and practices of lay and clerical Romanists, .

66
Comparison between Romanism and ancient Paganism,

66

66
The extent to which Christianity has been corrupted by Romanism,
The infallibility of the Pope, .
The right of private judgment among Romanists,
The trouble which the Scriptures cause the Romanists,

68
Passages in Scripture which the Pope should be called upon to interpret; 68
The second commandment set aside by Romanists,

68
Christ's words.on the perpetuity of the moral law,

68

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SATURDAY REVIEW, THE, on the disappearance of the Gipsies,
SCEPTICS seldom or never investigate the religion they object to,

75
Their so-called religion, as described by Mill,

77
SCOTT, SIR WALTER, his opinion on the disappearance of the Gipsies, 114
On the difficulties in acquiring the language of the Gipsies,

124
SKUNK, singular peculiarity in the,.

44
SNAKES, belligerency among,

7, 15, n15
Climbers and swiinmers,

22, 30, 41, 42
Constrictors,

31, 41
Eggs, description of,

8, 10, 14, 26, 32
Fascinating birds,

30, 31, 40, 41
Feeding,

7, 11, 22, 27, 29, 31, 41
Hatching of their eggs, probable time required for,

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29, 38

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158

SNAKES hatched on a mantelpiece, and on a table, .

7, 14
Holes, the use they make of,

IO, 27, 29
Hybernating, .

29
Incubators,

33, 43
Natural history of, how generally acquired,

16, 17, 26, 36
Nests, how made and found, .

8, 15, 18-21, 31, 33
Oviparous,

7, 8, 12, 14, 34, 37, 38
Progeny, number of,

8, 11, 18, 19, 29, 31–34
Scriptural allusions to,

17, 31
Skins, shedding of their,

9, 22, 27, 41
Swallowing of their young, 7-9,11,13,15,16,18,19, 23, 24, 26, 27, 34, 35, 37, n39
Apparent mode of,

9, 10, 16, 24, 26, 36, 38
All snakes should be assumed to be “swallowers,"
Viviparous (so-called),

n8, 12, 32, 34, 35, 37, 38
Water,

18
How their nests are built,

19
Young, how are they fed ?

10, 16, 25
Seldom seen by themselves,

9, 15
When seen by themselves,

27
SOCRATES, his sacrifice to Æsculapius,

51
Man's ignorance regarding his origin,

76
On the existence of God,

79
SOUTHEY, ROBERT, on the policy of the Jesuits,

n48
Styled Bunyan a “blackguard,”
On Bunyan's education, .

159
SPANISH GIPSIES,

123-127
ST. ANDREWS, Mill's legacy to the students of,

74
ST. PAUL on the laws of nature in the propagation of animals,

17
On godly sorrow and the sorrow of the world,

n50
On people who are ever learning,"

51
The sacrifices of the Gentiles, and the religion of nature,
Taken for a god at Lystra, and in the Island of Malta,

52
On the delusion sent to the ungodly,
His horror at having the divine honours of Pagans offered him,

54
His opposition to St. Peter,

55
On the religion of the Athenians,

58, 79, 82
On speaking in an unknown tongue, as applicable to the Pope's infalli-

bility, .
On the teaching and influence of the Holy Scriptures,
On the coming of Antichrist,

68
On the fear of death and future punishment, .

78
On the Epicurean creed,

80
ST. PETER-scorned to accept money to confer a Christian grace,

54
He commands people to pray to God for forgiveness, and raises Corne-
lius from the ground,

54
His character generally, .

54
STANLEY, DEAN, on the confessional and the Eastern Churches,

61
Eulogizes Bunyan at Bedford,

n161

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WATERTON, CHARLES, greatly in error in regard to snakes, .

39-42
Surrounds Walton Hall with a wall, for the sake of natural history, 42
His writings full of errors in regard to natural history, .

42, 46
On sunstroke,

: 43
The pythoness hatching her eggs,

43
The skunk,

44
. On wolves,

44
The apes on Gibraltar,

45
A description of his writings, .

46, 48
Avows himself to be a Romanist,

47
On bird-stuffers,

47
On closet naturalists,

44, 47
His character as a naturalist,

42, 47, 48
Some peculiarities in his private character,
His eulogium on the Jesuits, by whom he was educated,

47
How he got the better of a Jesuit at Stonyhurst,

n48
His complaint on being termed an unscientific naturalist,
He was not a man of science in the proper sense of the word,

49
WESTMINSTER REVIEW, THE, on the Gipsies,

n160
WHITE, GILBERT, of Selborne, on the propagation and feeding of snakes,

His testimony regarding vipers swallowing their young, and viper-catch-

ers,
Describes a viper pregnant with eggs, and another with young,
His theory regarding the hatching of vipers' eggs,

II, 12, 33
Was not apparently a scientific naturalist,
On monographers, .

17
On the difficulties attending the formation of a natural history,

17
On the comparing of one animal to another by memory,

18
As a man of candour, and open to conviction in regard to natural history, 19
On the genera of animals peculiar to America,

19
On the variety of the methods of Providence in natural history,
On the hatching of snakes' eggs,

20, 21
Was no bird-catcher or tamer,
On snakes shedding their skins,

Was not fond of analogous reasoning or theories, .
WOLVES, how they hunt their prey, .

44, 45
WORDSWORTH, the influence of his poetry on Mill,

96

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APPENDIX.

1. JOHN BUNYAN AND THE GIPSIES.*

AY
WORK by myself, entitled Con- | (1874), we find—“John, son of Jolin

tributions to Natural History and Mary Bunnyon, bap. 16 Octoand Papers on Other Subjects, now in ber, 1679," taken from the register the hands of Edinburgh publishers, of Christ Church, Barbadoes. from stereotype plates sent from this In the Sunday Magazine, for Janside, was set up before I saw Notes uary, 1875, I find the following :and Queries of the 11th July last,

“ The Rev. John Brown, of Bunyan which contains an article from Mr. meeting, has gone with great care into Dudley Cary Elwes, on the parent- many of the old registers connected with age of John Bunyan. In that arti- | the meeting and the parish, and has cle Mr. Elwes writes :

contrived to throw a good deal of light

on several points regarding the Great As I was (by the courtesy of the Dreamer.' First of all, he finds that vicar of the parish), inspecting the reg- the idea of Bunyan being of Gipsy race, ter of Wootton parish, Co. Bedfordshire, is totally discountenanced, which suppoI came across the following entries, sition might have been encouraged by which evidently allude to some of John the fact of Bunyan's trade being that Bunyan's ancestors, as Wootton is not so of a tinker or travelling brazier, in which very far from Elstow-about five miles-, many Gipsies were engaged. He has and they may, perhaps, eventually lead discovered that though the name of to the discovery of who were his par- Bunyan has now died out from Bedfordents; they also do away with the sup- shire, it is of great antiquity, and was position of those who think that John pretty common there under various forms Bunyan may have had Gipsy blood in of spelling: It was borne by people of his veins."

good position.” And he gives a list of seven bap

And the writer quotes from The tisms, four marriages, and five buri- Book of the Bunyan Festival, as folals of people of the names of Bun

lows:nion and Bunion, between the years 1581 and 1645.

“In the original accounts of the real In Notes and Queries for roth seized by the Parliament of England,

and personal estates of delinquents October, 1874, D. C. E. gives a list between the years 1642 and 1648, the of many baptisms, marriages, and rent of Sir George Bynnion, delinquent, burials, principally under the name in the parish of Eaton-Socon, Bedfordof Bonyon, from Chalgrave register, shire, is returned at £223, iis. 4d. Co. Beds., between the years 1559

From the same account it appears that and 1629. And in John Camden the land of Mr. Foster, delinquent, in Hotten's Original list of Emigrants, to John Bunnyon, tenant, at a rent of

the parish of Stretly, was let by the year etc., to the American Plantations, £30. It is perhaps worthy of notice,

* This article on “ John Bunyan and that the farm of this John Bunnyon was the Gipsies,” was sent to Notes and Que- not far from that_village of Samsell, ries, on the 3d March, 1875, and printed where our John Bunyan was appreon the 27th. I have thought it advisable hended for preaching. Were they kinsto insert it here, in its original form. men, and had the tinker been on a visit

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