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FRANKLIN, BENJAMIN, his creed,
FRASER'S MAGAZINE on Mill's associating with Mrs. Taylor,
FROGS as eaten by snakes,
FROGS' mode of propagation,

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GIPSIES, probable number of the, in Great Britain and Ireland,
How they mix their blood and perpetuate their race,

112, 126, 127
Their secrecy in regard to their language,

115, 116, 118, 120, 123
Gipsy surnames,

121, 130
Stealing children,

121, 122
Spanish Gipsies,

123-127
Hungarian Gipsies,

123, n125, 138
English Gipsies,

127-129, 142
Irish Gipsies,

129, NI32, 141
Education among the Gipsies,

NI32, 159
The natural perpetuation of the race,

133, 134
How the subject should be investigated,

134
How a Gipsy is reared, .

135
The effects of the prejudice that exists against the Gipsy race, 136, 146
How they gradually leave the tent, and acquire settled habits,

136
The love which they have for their language,

137
How the language is taught, and how it has got mixed with others,

138
How they resent the curiosity of others in regard to their language, 139
American Gipsies, .

141
The universality of the race,

141
Its destiny, .

142
The difference between mixed Gipsies and ordinary natives, .

143
Peculiarities of settled Gipsies,

143-145
How they resent the prejudice that exists against them,

147
Their ideas of their social position,

147
How they “marry among themselves," and "stick to each other," 148
Improvement of the Gipsies, .

148-150, 156
Arrival of the tribe in Scotland, in 1506,

150
Their organization, social position, and destiny,

151
Civilized Gipsies,

151
Their secrecy, nature, and mutual sympathies,

152
The perpetuation of the Gipsies resembles that of the Jews, . 164, 167, 168
GOODE, PROF. G. BROWN, his information on American snakes,

36-38
GOSSE, P. H., on the Jamaica boa generally,

33
On snakes fascinating birds,

41
GREEK CHURCH, THE, Romanists' aversion to hear it mentioned, .

55
It scorns the claims of Rome, and denies its baptism,

60
Its confessional and status generally,

61
GRELLMANN on the colour of the Gipsies as they become civilized,

N125
On the secrecy of the Gipsies in regard to their language,

123, 138
GUTHRIE, DR. THOMAS, on the effects of patronage on Scotch divinity stu-
dents,

n71
His advantages as a student and probationer compared with others, ngo

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HALE, SIR MATTHEW, his interview with Bunyan's wife,

159
HOYLAND, JOHN, on Gipsy surnames,

I21
HUMBOLDT, as an ornithologist, as estimated by Waterton,

39
HUNGARIAN GIPSIES,

123, N125, 138
HUNTER, JOHN DUNN, on snakes in the Western States of America,

n15
On the rattlesnake swallowing its young,

34
On the rattlesnake charming or magnetizing birds,

40
How buffaloes protect their young against wolves,

45

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INDIA, James Mill's History of,
IRISH GIPSIES in Great Britain and the United States,

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JAMAICA, experiments on the boa wanted in,

35
JESUITS, Waterton educated by the,

47
The dislike of other people for them,

47
The end of their teaching,
Their policy as described by Southey,

n48
The honour in which they hold Christ and his Apostles,

57
JEWS, the, disliked by the Gipsies,

130
Their language during the Babylonian captivity,

140
The Gipsies marry among themselves, like the Jews,

148
Protected by a cloud while in the wilderness,

155
A scattered people before the destruction of Jerusalem,

161
The means of their dispersion,

161
The Jews an exclusive family, possessing an exclusive religion,

162
Their peculiar nature, special genius, and persecution keep them dis-
tinct from others,

163
The isolation of the Jews effected entirely by natural causes,

164
How a Jew is reared,

164
His religion a secondary consideration, .

164
The indifference of many Jews to their religion,

. 1165
The religion of the Jews previous to the Mosaic law,

. 1165
The position they occupy in the world to-day,

165
How they were affected by the destruction of Jerusalem,

166
The light in which they look on their race and religion,

166
The phenomena of their race the greatest bar to their conversion to
Christianity,

167
The comparison and contrast between an Englishman and an English Jew, 167
How Jews tolerate each other in the matter of religion,

168
The profession of Christianity does not destroy the nationality of Jews, 168
The peculiar genius of the Jews as a scattered people, .

168
Their religion, and the light in which they look on themselves,

169
Their ideas of a Messiah,

169
The phenomenon of the Jews as a scattered people,

169
JOB on the ostrich,

23
On the mystery of his existence,

81
JOHNSON, SAMUEL, on a person becoming religious,

64
On a certain kind of ambition,

153

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LELAND, C. G., on Dickens and the Gipsies,

On John Bunyan's nationality,
LEWIS AND CLARKE's allusion to wolves hunting their prey,

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93, 96

92, 96

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73, 76, 82

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MARMONTEL'S Memoires—The alleged effect they had on Mill,
MARRIAGE in connection with Mill,

98, 99, 101, 104, 105
METHODISM, Mill's allusion to,
MILL, JAMES, his education for the Church, and rejection of all religion, 69
Becomes a tutor, and then settles in London as an author,

69
His personal character as described by his son,

69, 71, 86-88
His religious history previous to his becoming a practical atheist, 69, 70, 76
The effect that Butler's Analogy had on him,

70
His reading of sceptical books while at college,
His playing the hypocrite for the benefit of the worldly advancement, 70, 71
His literary character as described by his son,

71, 85, 108, 109
Becomes the servant and satellite of the East India Company,

72
His careful training of his family to have no religious belief,

73
His ideas on religion generally,
His ideas on the subject and standard of morality,
The odiousness of his religious, or want of religious, sentiments,

74
His temper, deportment, and mode of instructing his children at home, 86, 87
His humble rearing,

89
His unfitness to have the charge of children,

89
The estimate he put on feeling,

96
How he left the world,

108
His ideas on human life, education, and government,

108-110
His letter to Jeremy Bentham,

108
MILL, JOHN STUART, is brought up without any religious belief,

69, 73
As a servant and satellite of the East India Company,

72, 91
On the bad effects of reticence in the matter of religion,

72
His aristocratic standing as an English atheist,

72
His ideas of the worship of God in any form,

73
His ideas on the subject and standard of morality, 73, 80, 85, 95, 96, 100
On religion in general,
He makes a religion of his wife's memory,

77
His philosophical canting,
His utopian ideas on what philosophers are to accomplish,

81
Proposes his education as an example for others,
The probable opinion of the world in regard to it,

83
His early “studies,”
His wonderful acquirements,
His complete break-down in defining the words, idea, and theory,
His crude ideas regarding education and the capacity of children, 84, 85
As a “tumbler” in the “arena of thought,” .
As a speaker, .

n86
As a teacher of his brothers and sisters,

87
On the “corrupting influences" of boys, and his lack of boyish amuse-

ments, .

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PAGE
MILL, JOHN STUART, how he ultimately shook himself clear of his father, 89

On the ungodliness, unnatural treatment, and cruelty in his education, . 90
He begins at fifteen to be a “reformer of the world,”

90, 92
His life previous to his engagement with the East India Company, 91.
Attacked by a nervous disorder-A “crisis in his mental history," 92
How he emerged from it, with the results it had on him,

93
The apparent cause of the disorder,

94
His estimate of the break-down in his father's system of instruction, 95
His crude ideas regarding the “basis of his philosophy of life,”

95
His ideas of the cultivation of the feelings, music, poetry, and human

affections,
The treatment he should have had during the “crisis in his mental
history,"

94, 96
The extravagant language inscribed on his wife's tomb,
His deficiency in looking at two sides, not to say all sides, of a question, 101
Egotism as part of his character,

83, 102, 108, 110
The firm of Mill, Son & Co.-Its establishment, principles, and sign or

coat-of-arms,
The loss he sustained intellectually by the death of his father,
His “apostleship" that of rank atheism,

105
His principles destructive of the opinions and institutions of his country, 105
The mischief-making tendencies of his nature and teaching, .

105, IIO
A fanatic as judged by the standard of his father,

106
A made or manufactured man, as described by himself,

106
Educated and trained like a stalled ox,

106
Much of a demagogue in his principles and practices,

106
His crude and raw-lad-like peculiarities,

106, 107
His deficiency in common sense, and delicacy or manliness of feeling, 94, 107
His ideas regarding Carlyle,

108
His various changes,

An estimate of some aspects of his character,
MILL, MRS., her memory made a religion of by her husband,

77
· Was she also an atheist, like himself?
His regard for her the main reason for writing his Autobiography, 97
How Mill made her acquaintance,

97
Her talents, and the great influence she exercised over him,

97
Leaves her husband, Mr. Taylor, for the society of Mill,

97
Repudiation of criminality in the relation,

98
Her intimacy with Mill a source of bitterness to her husband,

99
And the cause of a separation between Mill and his friends,

99
The peculiar ideas of Mill and Mrs. Taylor on the subject of liberty, 99
The uncertainty of Mrs. Taylor's support while separated from her

husband,
The death of Mr. Taylor, and the marriage of the widow to Mill,
Her death at Avignon, and the epitaph placed on her tomb, .
Her

many exalted qualities, as described by Mill, .
The great service she was to him in his literary enterprises,

99, 103
The part she had in his various works,

103-105

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PAGE
MILL, MRS., in what way did she acquire all the knowledge she possessed ? 105
MIRACLES, the nature of,

161, 162
MONOGRAPHERS, White of Selborne on

17
MOORE, NORMAN, his high eulogium on Waterton not sustained by facts, 40, 42, 48, 49

His use of improper language when alluding to others, .
MORMONISM, the hold it has on its followers,

53

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NATURALISTS should be guided mainly by facts in their researches,

16
Generally men of humanity and intelligence, .

18
Closet, Waterton's antipathy to,

42, 44, 47
NATURAL HISTORY, how researches should be conducted in, 3, 18, 28, 34, 36
Of man in his apostacy from God,

n53
NATURAL RELIGION, see Paganism.
NOVELISTS, the general intellectual character of,

152

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PAGANISM, the difficulty in converting a people from,

49
The sacrifices of the Gentiles, the prayer of Plato, and the sacrifice of
Socrates,

51
Natural religion apparently the corruption of an original revelation, 51
Natural religion, as described by St. Paul,

51
The difficulties attending the establishment of a religion,

52
St. Paul taken for a god on two occasions,

52, 54
The establishment of Mormonism,

53
Human Nature capable of setting up a worship of its own,

53
And converting a revelation into a religion of nature,

49, 53
Deification among the ancient Pagans,

n53
The natural history of man in the matter of religion,

n53
The religion of the Athenians,

58, 79, 82
Contrast between the claims of the priests of modern and ancient
Rome, .

59
Cicero on an ancestral religion,

59, 60, 66
Its foundation the authority of the priests and tradition,

59
Paganism in some respects tolerant,

59
Plutarch on the “agreeable things" connected with Paganism,

59
It could neither be attacked nor defended on the question of its ori-
gin,

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It rested entirely on “venerating the religion of its ancestors,”

60
It gave to Romanists most of their peculiarities, .

61
How it existed before and after the establishment of Christianity,

62
The awe inspired by Pagan temples and religious groves,

65
The worship of Diana of the Ephesians,
The religions of ancient and modern Rome compared,

66
PALL MALL GAZETTE, THE, on the Gipsies, .
PAN, Plato's prayer addressed to,

51

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