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which forbade her to reign on the pented of. Come, sir, tell us your throne. Even on the throne her power crime." was felt, but her authority was acknow- “ He is in the antechamber, madame, ledged in the salons. There her an English gentleman, a friend of Lord guests were instruments which she go. Annadale. Will it please you to proverned, from which she produced a nounce my doom or my pardon, when harmony, each in orderly obedience to you have seen the extent of my daring. her command, yet with the spirit and May I introduce my friend ? I defer charm of voluntary wit “discoursing the explanation of my boldness until most excellent music.” In a word, some future hour, when the tediousevery thing, except heart, embellished ness may be less annoying." these lively soirees, and even heartless- At a sign of indulgence, Monsieur ness, carefully guarded as it was, had de Mortagne left the chamber, and preits pleasing effect. It rendered the wit, sently returned, introducing Carleton, like stars that shine brightest in a who, notwithstanding all he had suffrosty atmosphere, more keenly bril- fered, paid his compliments gracefully, liant, and it prevented the freedom of as he took the place assigned him near the entertainment from overstepping Madame de Valmont. the lines of prudence or politeness, “ Your voices," said she; “shall and degenerating into excess.

Monsieur de Mortagne be pardoned, The salon of Madame de Valmont, as a grace for the amiable addition he although not one of those which had has made to our society?" attained the highest distinction and “ Pardon, pardon," cried out several celebrity, yet partook of the character- voices. istics of the time; the conversation at “ But,” said the beautiful blonde, her table was a graceful mixture of “ with a reserve that, to the best of his sprightliness, if not wit-and good abilities, he accounts for his tardisense ; and under an explosion of light

ness." laughter, at one of the liveliest sallies “ Do you require a true narrative of of the evening, de Mortagne made his proceedings while he was guilty of his entry unobserved, and surprised absence?" his fair hostess—bending the knee in “ No, no, madame, we are not so playful homage beside her.

extravagant. Let him explain ; if he “ You !" cried she, “ faithless and romance, let his story be pleasant in truant-so late and so daring."

proportion as it is not true, and it will A suppliant to your august clem- amuse us into pronouncing a general ency, although more daring than you pardon." have even yet imagined."

" What an idea," said de Mortagne, “What new treason? Come, tell looking round into every face, “my all your guilt before you sue for forgive- fair and good friends please to enterEnough, and more than enough

tain of me. I shall explain, and my already to be pardoned and punished. explanation shall be true.

I was not First, you fail in true allegiance-de- at your soiree, Madame la Comtesse, serting my soiree, and leaving me ex- because I was”_here he made a pause posed to the perils of magic which during which every face betrayed imwoman can least resist-magic that can patience and expectation, at length he add to the charm of mystery, the at- completed the sentence in a voice subtraction of being new, and the boast of dued to a whisper—“at mass." being prohibited. You leave me to “ At mass ! at mass! What ! turnencounter the shocks of repulsion and ing devout, is that your explanation?" sympathy, forsaken by the trusty coun- An explanation not to be admitsellor and friend, whose wisdom was to ted,” said the lady who had pronounced shield me from all evil influences. Next his sentence. « Monsieur le Vicomte you taunt me with your indifference, promised us truth. What he has contemning my petit souper, and make given us is neither pleasant nor true; it too plain that it would give you he should have been here before the no concern had the sorcerer bewitched mass commenced; this after-thought me, or changed me into a sylph. And of devotion shall not serve his purpose. now that you appear, some horrid It is an involuntary acknowledgment crime untold, unimagined, has still that he is wholly without excuse~an to be pardoned-perhaps, to be re- acknowledgment not entitled to fa.

ness.

vour, for it wants the touching recom- thing to relate to Madame de Valmont mendation of remorse. Judge, ladies, which may win me indulgence and with me, has Monsieur de Mortagne favour. This was my reason for enthe look or manner of a true penitent?' tering St. Germain l'Auxerrois to.

“ Oh, madame, as to penitence, I night." renounce it, on principle. Indeed I * Well, and the success? What had little taste for it at any time ; but face or figure will you describe, to since I became a man, I have discarded make the portrait of it a compensait from my list of tolerated weak- tion for your long absence ?” nesses. Penitence- it is the sound of 6 Alas! madarne-none. If I did a conscience that goes too slow. If notice any thing worth describing, it your clock will not strike the hours in has passed from my memory. I was proper time, better it should be silent. reminded of an incident in my early A man who orders his life wisely will life-a danger, an escape, and the cost make it become so. I like repentance

of it. The whole scene came upon in a fine Corregio. Your blue eyes, me with a power that caused every madame, would give a captivating inte- thing around to be forgotten. If you rest to snch an expression. It does can grant indulgence to such a story not suit me; I discard it. But as to of by-gone days, it will make me my explanation-my after-thought, as happy to relate it. Madame de Launy terms it, it is just, “ Relate— by all means-relate.” although it applies more properly, “ Well, madame, to commence. In madame, to your after-party My ex- the year of grace seventeen hundred cuse for the soiree is—an accident. I and something, when I was in Irewas hastening from St. Denis, over landroads, as you can well believe, on “ In Ireland—you a resident in Irewhich ice has done its office. My mis- land ?" fortune was almost matter of course. “ Yes, madame-even in Ireland.” One of my horses fell. I spare you

But do tell us, how came you to details, and merely add, that when I be an inhabitant of that country? arrived at my hotel, it was too late to Was it for pleasure or for improveavail myself of the privilege to wait on ment? I never knew that you had madame.”

written of it, I have not heard you “ And so you proceeded straight- speak of it." way,” said his fair persecutor, “to re- “ Nevertheless, madame, I was turn thanks for your preservation- there. I directed the recruiting ser. from the soiree or the fall-which was vice." it? It shows a good disposition to Mystery within mystery. What have been thankful for either.

can you mean?" least it shows that gratitude is not in Simply, madame, what I have the so bad repute with you, as remorse.”

honour to say.

You are aware that “By no means, madame. Gratitude !

we have had in our army many soldiers it never harmed mortal.

It is an un- of fortune from Ireland, and that we presuming quality; and when a strong have at this moment Irish regiments passion or interest is in the way, will in our service. We recruited for accept an excuse or a denial. I admit them in their own country. I see, Mr. gratitude—it admits of management; Carleton, you look rather sceptical. but there is only one course to be It is the simple truth. And more taken with repentance. It bears none -the practice was overlooked-conbut bitter fruits, and must be rooted pived at, perhaps, by some of your out. But, returning to my explana- ablest ministers. What are we to tion :-I threw myself on your cle. do, said they. There is a reservoir mency, with a fixed purpose, to win it of treason in Ireland-hundreds of by truth alone. There is a charm in thousands who, by the very laws of a resolution of this kind which I would their being, will resist the laws of the not willingly dissipate. Even for me, land. Surely 'tis as well they should madame, novelty has attraction. I did be drained off-that the reservoir of not go to the church to return thanks peccant humours shall be exhausted. to God, or saint, or man; but I said, I They will be no less mischievous in will follow this crowd, and enter where Ireland than in Flanders or France ; it enters-perhaps I shall find some- while the difference will be, that

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France must pay if she take them in the neighbourhood of the tower, des. away, while she has their services for cended to it with an abruptness that nothing if we detain them at home. was little less than perpendicular. A This reasoning, Mr. Carleton, is my boat was to be provided for me in the own. I merely suppose it to be that morning after my arrival, and I was of your statesmen.

I did not reason to be conducted into a place of greater so while I was acting as, in some sort, safety. I was by no means sorry that your enemy; but reflecting since on my partnership (as the English mermany circumstances connected with chants say) in the swinish multitude was my recruiting performances, I have dissolved, especially when, towards the come to the conclusion that our acti- end of our last day's journey, a mounted vities must have been overlooked of traveller, unattended, while set purpose.

However, it was to be versing with my companion, threw explained, we were for a time so some sharp glances towards me. To his untroubled in

our vocation, that questions I was proof; my partner we recruited and sent off our men answering for me that I could not with little care or caution. We knew speak English. I was modest enough the traffic in human lives was con- you observe, to think it possible that a trary to law, but felt as if it were foreign accent might betray me. Still sanctioned by custom.

I thought the over-curious traveller A time came when we had the was not over-satisfied, and felt well excitement of opposition and danger pleased that the days of the disguise I to season our enjoyment. Men en- then wore were numbered. You shall listed with a fear of the rope-they see by the result that my alarm was hang, at least they used to bang, better founded than my security. with reasonable liberality in Ireland

6. At the earliest dawn of a morning and in receiving and disposing of them, in June we were startled out of a short we were forced to be on the alert, to slumber. The enemy were upon us, evade sharp pursuit, and to adopt un- not actually at our fortalice, but discouth disguises.

cernible at a distance and approach“ I travelled once for some days in ing. I must do the Irish people the company with—perhaps I should say justice to say that, fanciful as they in attendance upon – a drover—not are, their imagination is of the kind one who was of dignity to drive oxen, which is most convenient; instead

even sheep-my associate was a of exhausting itself in magnifying a merchant of swine. I accompanied danger, however formidable and sud. him in the appropriate costume_by den, it helps them to expedients by which no means, I can assure you, an invit- they escape from it. My boat bad ing one—but it had the merit of not arrived about midnight, and no more inviting pursuit. The very slowness was necessary than that I should reach of our march favoured us; and many it in time. To retard the progress of a time they who were in quest of us- the military party, my partner in the of me rather-passed on with a word swine affair, routed up his heavy charge or two to my companion, who was and drove them before him to the long spokesinan on each occasion, and left causeway, which connected our forme unmolested. After this fashion tress with the main land. Three men my trusty associate conducted his drove who had met us at the tower were left and me, in safety, to the halting-place,

The eldest offered to conwhere our ways were to separate. duct me to the boat. The path to it,

“ It was a habitation rude enough ; he said, wound along the side of the portion of an old round tower, perched hill-I might escape the notice of the boldly on a high and precipitous rock military-I might also be observed. projecting into a great lake connected If his honour (this is one of the titles with, I believe, the largest of the Irish conferred rather liberally by the Irish rivers—the Shannon, I think, it is people) would not think it too much called. A jarrow road, a kind of trouble, there was a rope-ladder by isthmus, of some hundred yards in which I could descend directly from length, connected this little peninsula, the tower, and enter the boat without on which the tower was seated, with an instant's exposure.

Observe, I the main land. The whole was con- pray you, the pbrase “too much trou. siderably elevated above the river, and, ble. The delicacy of savage life is

or

with me.

beyond all praise. He knew as well 6. All that I have had the honour to as I knew myself that the correct word describe to you, passed so quickly, that would be, not trouble, but danger. my partner of the preceding day had He had an instinct to teach bim that not entered on the road from the tower it would not be the proper word. I when my old friend and I came forth soon set him at ease. No man should to struggle for deliverance. Our de. engage in an adventurous life without sign was to loosen and tear down some having a steady head. Giddiness, large fragments of the decayed maphysical giddiness, has often defeated

sonry, carry them to the verge of the great exploits, and brought many an platform, and precipitate them on the enterprising career to a sudden and unsuspecting sentinels. My swine disastrous close. I set my friend at compeller turned back from his way. rest. He proceeded, with much des- The soldiers were yet a good way off, patch, to uncover an aperture in the and, before he wandered forth to infloor of our rude apartment, and terrupt them with his ungracious showed me, at a sufficiently appalling drove, he thought that, for a few distance beneath, the still, dark water. minutes, he could lend a hand,' as Across the orifice I saw two thick iron he expressed himself, to assist in kil. bars extended. A ladder of rope,

ling their friends in the boat. attached to them, was uncoiled, and I “ Well, madame, we set to work heard the plash as it fell into the river. with right good will, although with My poor friend remained for a few implements ill-adapted to our purpose. seconds looking down, and as he raised We proceeded slowly, painfully, I may his face it was pale with consternation. well add, vexatiously. If you are toil.

“ • There are two boats, colonel, ing prosperously, you will often depredear,' said he, and one of them is cate any partnership in your labours ; the enemy's.'

but if you are unsuccessful, it provokes " He was right_closely drawn to the you much to see persons, whom you bank—so closely as to be effectually would not, perhaps, ask to assist you, covered by the high rock, which rather busy in their own pursuits, and taking retreated than sloped out as it ap- no thought of your perplexities. In proached the river-we could see, such an emergency as mine, a trial of by the side-view which our station this kind was very sharp. While we afforded us, a boat, with one man toiled as only those, who strive for life holding the oars, and two with mili- against minutes, can toil, my fellowtary great-coats, and armed as soldiers. labourers praying for assistance from The scheme was well laid. The in- the saints, and I cursing the masons quisitive traveller had seen, no doubt, who had done their work so mischiemore than he affected to observe ; and vously well, a boy or youth, of about the secret of our fort, too, had been sixteen years of age, active and strong discovered. I was to be arrested by enough to be useful, was amusing himthe party coming in front, or, if I self in the double enjoyment of torventured by the postern, I was to be menting us, and worrying two monintercepted on the water.

strous beasts, who had separated from “ What was to be done? I had a their amiable companions, and whom brace of pistols ; but against the arms he was labouring by means of ropes of the soldiers they were, in any case,

thrown round their heads, to bring poor weapons, and at our present dis- back to their place in the drove. tance from them, they were wholly I was angry, I confess.

Once I was useless. Could we- from our com- strongly tempted to waste one of my manding eminence-could we sink the two shots on the urchin ; but I felt enemy? Oh! how I wished for heavy that both might have a better employshot, or mighty stones to send down ment, and I thought it possible that upon them.

The wretched abode the lad's father, who laboured enerwhere we passed the night was utterly getically with me, would not approve naked and desolate-it afforded no of the vengeance I wished to inflict on moveables of use for our purpose. his provoking offspring. There was no parapet on the ledge of The wretch, too, had his own rock which we might overturn. Still trouble. The more earnestly he tugwe would not give up life or liberty ged, the more obstinately the sulky without an effort.

brutes retreated. At last, in their backward march, they neared the not with the same delight, as I could verge of the rock where there was a

yours, madame.

Almost in the act of sheer descent to the water. Sud. rising, he was struck down; one denly a thought of the boy'3 intent mighty ruin plunged him into the flashed on my mind. While we toiled water, and overturned the boat as he wearily and in vain, one man had re- fell. The second shock was unnecesmained with him, and this man I saw sary-it merely accelerated the catashasten to the tower, and peer out cau- trophe. tiously through the aperture. Words “ My rope-ladder was now made were interchanged between him and fast, and I hastily descended. As I the boy, and a slight alteration in the reached the lowest steps, I could perposture of the swine effected. I could ceive that there was some commotion wait no longer-I hastened to the in the boat. I saw but the conclusion tower, and there the whole plan was of it. One only of the crew had risen open before me.

from the river depths. Hurt and help“ On the verge of the precipice, less as he was, he would have found with heads landward, tails pendant mercy, had he been in other attire. over empty space, there stood the two The regimentals proved his ruin.

At colossal creatures. Directly under the moment I stepped off the ladder, them was

boat. The boy had done his fate was decided. The last blow his part, and would now have the catas- was mortal. The water was bloody trophe duly accomplished. "Father,' around him_his hands slided off from said he, • Denis, leave those stones at the side of the boat, and with his eyes rest; they will be at rest whether you in a wide and ghastly stare, his face uplike it or no, and come here where you turned, and almost as dreadful in a can do some good.' With hands up- paleness where death seemed anticilifted in wonder, the men obeyed and pated, as where the red blood was stood beside the boy. Now, James, rushing over his hair and shouldersdarling,' cried he to my companion in he slowly sunk. the tower, is all right-is the aim “We gave little time to watch or sure?" "Surer than a miser's money- think of him, but pulled our way visurer could not be,' was the reply. gorously across the river.

When we “Then,' said the boy, 'God send Saxon stood out a little from the bank, we George's sodgers an easy death.' Not could see what passed on the isthmus. another word was spoken. The ca- My friend, the proprietor of the swine, tastrophe was effected in speechless

had chosen his fate with me. He and ness, so far as man was concerned. another of the party were with us in The boy tugged passionately at his the boat, while the drove were left in ropes—the brutes, as is their wont, charge of the boy who had so distinstubbornly retreated. Their hind-legs guished himself, and of his associate in passed over the precipice. There was the achievement. We could see that the struggle of moment, but only a they had reached the mainland withmoment. The weight of the monsters, out meeting the military, and soon and a little aid from the father and after we were safe in recesses at the son, promptly decided the affair. other bank of the river, where danger, Down went the elephant-like monsters in the shape of the Elector's soldiers, -a horrid avalanche-on the unsus- was little likely to reach us.” pecting ambush. A man had risen in The story was received with indulthe boat-perhaps hearing faintly the gence, and with the expressions of far-off cry of the creatures in their last pretty horror and interest, meet for struggle. From :ny post of observa- the narrator's encouragement. It was tion I could see his countenance as he followed by questions which had been beheld the descending masses. The retained in suspense during the recital, expression was of pure amazement-a for explanations of incidents which the bewilderment of faculties so absolute auditory were not prepared fully to as to banish thought and even fear. understand. At length it was reStrange how the vision of an instant membered that one important matter shall stamp an image upon the memory was left untold. such as can never be obliterated. I “ You said that the story was sugnever saw such an expression of face gested to you this evening. How was before or since, and if I were a painter that? Where is the connection be. I could trace it as accurately, though tween a midnight mass at St. Germain

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