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VILLAGE BELLES.

VILLAGE BELLES.

7

melting kindness. In each other's society they felt no weariness, but neither of them was of a temper so fastidious as to turn with distaste from those among whom Providence had placed them, because their habits were less refined than their

Almost immediately opposite the church, in residence known as Okely Park, and which only required better keeping up to make it rank as a handsome country seat, lived old Lady Worral. The only two houses with sash windows in the village were tenanted, the one by Mr. Good the apothecary, the other by Mr. Greenway, a retired schoolmaster. Farmer Holland, the happy parent of three bouncing daughters, occupied a substantial dwelling in the midst of his corn-fields, about half a mile from Summerfield. The remaining population consisted of tradespeople and peasantry, who received the conciliatory visits of the new vicar and his wife with civility and gratitude. On nearer acquaintance with the superior class of their neighbours, they discovered that old Lady Worral was busy and interfering, eccentric in her dress and blunt in her manners; Mr. and Mrs. Good the best people in the world ; Mr. Greenway a martyr to the rheumatism, and his

tik a fetcher and carrier of other people's observ.
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; Farmer Holland a complete John Bull

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with his joke and tankard ; and the three Miss
Bolauds handsome, cheerful

, and bustling. Young Mas Welford was at first rather annoyed by the vrastant supervision of her titled neighbour; sur di Lady Worral was always popping in upon be, in the garden, the parlour, or the kitchen; but the son ceased to care whether she was caught in a coarse apron, or a gown pulled through the jobet bole, shelling peas or making a pudding: in Ladly Worral had no notion of a “parson's vite sticking up to be a fine lady." Indeed the

hamber of a fine lady was the object of her su

pesme contempt; for though she piqued hersel much on her ancient birth,“ being descende from the De Bameville that went on the first cry tele, yet she considered it no degradation her dignity to check her steward's accounts, lo hier bet turkeys, scold the village children, a give Mrs. Wellford a receipt by word of mo box that “ heterogeneous combination of culir ingredients” gcleped a hodge-podge.

The defunct Sir John Worral had been s thing of a humourist. “Knowledge is po

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wife a fetcher and carrier of other people's observations ; Farmer Holland a complete John Bull, with his joke and tankard ; and the three Miss Hollands handsome, cheerful, and bustling. Young Mrs. Wellford was at first rather annoyed by the constant supervision of her titled neighbour; for old Lady Worral was always popping in upon her, in the garden, the parlour, or the kitchen; but she soon ceased to care whether she was caught in a coarse apron, or a gown pulled through the pocket hole, shelling peas or making a pudding; for Lady Worral had no notion of a “parson's wife sticking up to be a fine lady.” Indeed the character of a fine lady was the object of her supreme. contempt; for though she piqued herself much on her ancient birth, “being descended from the De Barneville that went on the first cru, sade," yet she considered it no degradation of her dignity to check her steward's accounts, look after her turkeys, scold the village children, and give Mrs. Wellford a receipt by word of mouth for that "heterogeneous combination of culinary ingredients” ycleped a hodge-podge.

The defunct Sir John Worral had been something of a humourist. “Knowledge is power,"

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wife a fetcher and carrier of other people's observations; Farmer Holland a complete John Bull, with his joke and tankard ; and the three Miss Hollands handsome, cheerful, and bustling. Young Mrs. Wellford was at first rather annoyed by the constant supervision of her titled neighbour; for old Lady Worral was always popping in upon her, in the garden, the parlour, or the kitchen; but she soon ceased to care whether she was caught in a coarse apron, or a gown pulled through the pocket hole, shelling peas or making a pudding; for Lady Worral had no notion of a “parson's wife sticking up to be a fine lady.” Indeed the character of a fine lady was the object of her supreme contempt; for though she piqued herself much on her ancient birth, “being descended from the De Barneville that went on the first cru, sade,” yet she considered it no degradation of her dignity to check her steward's accounts, look after her turkeys, scold the village children, and give Mrs. Wellford a receipt by word of mouth for that "heterogeneous combination of culinary ingredients” ycleped a hodge-podge.

The defunct Sir John Worral had been something of a humourist. “Knowledge is power,

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