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thodical and reputable in their performance; and a knowledge of the principles on which, in this volume, the art of Logic is founded, can scarcely fail to facilitate the progress of youth in becoming good reasoners.

of this they may be assured, if they have sufficient candour to admit there is such a thing as good reasoning, that there is no accomplishment or qualification any man can acquire more important, than the art of reasoning well. Whether then, youth shall become, in life, men of speculation or men of business, in every step they take, their rational faculties must be constantly exercised; and the subject of which we now speak is calculated entirely to render them expert and successful in that exercise.

The FIFTH Book which offers a sketch of “The Philoso phy of Human Knowledge," seemed a necessary Appendix to the volume; but it was not my object, in the compass of a few pages, to enter upon a subject which I intend to publish in a separate work, as a sequel to my Grammars of Rhetoric and Logic.

And, for the purpose of initiating youth in the doctrines oi the Philosophy of Mind, I have constructed, on this Graminar of Logic, a Book of “Questions and Exercises,” with a ** Key" to the same ; as, in my humble judgment, no discipline is more successful in accomplishing its end, than that which reduces literature, philosophy, and science, to interlocutory discourse, conducted in the style and manner of a spirited dialogue. The ease with which the entire volume xmay be converted into “Dialogues on Logic and Intellectual Philosophy,” by means of its companion, the “Book of Questions," can only be equalled by the advantages which yonth ever derive from catechetical instruction, possessing the sprightliness of living language, and familiarising the speakers to unpremeditated extempore discussion. If any thing can verify the observations contained in this Introduction, it must be the practice of the catechetical method

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which I now recommend—a practice which distinguished the instructions of Socrates, which Plato has preserved in his Dialogues, and to which Cicero has reduced almost all his philosophical writings.

ALEXANDER JAMIESON.

London, March, 1819.

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BOOK IV.

GRAMMAR OF-LOGIC.

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CHAPTER
I. OF IDEAS

• 207 Of simple and complex Ideas

- 208 Of distinct and confused Ideas

ib. Of adequate and inadequate Ideas

209 Of particular or abstracted Ideas

210 Rules for the Acquisition and Examination of Ideas and Words

211 Of the Ambiguity of Words

215 Of Enumeration, Description, and Definition

219 II. OF PROPOSITIONS

223 Knowledge and Truth

ib. Different kinds of Propositions

· 225 Sources of Human Knowledge

228 Of mathematical, moral, political, and prudential Reasoning

232 Different species of Reasoning

- 238 Examples of Reasoning a Priori

· 240 Example of Reasoning a Posteriori

ib, Analytic and Synthetic Reasoning

241 Example of Analytic Reasoning

242 III. OF SOPHISTRY

243 IV. OF REASONING AND SYLLOGISM

249 Of the Constitution of Syllogisms

250 Of plain simple Syllogisms, and their Rules

- 253 of the Modes and Figures of simple Syllogisms

- 255 Of Complex Syllogisms

- 259 Of Conjunctive Syllogisms

- 261

- 265 Of Compound, Imperfect, or Irregular Syllogisms Of the Merit of Syllogistic Reasoning

272

BOOK V.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE.

1. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE ADDRESSED TO THE MEMORY 278 II. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE ADDRESSED TO THE UNDERSTANDING

285 III. HUMAN KNOWLEDGE ADDRESSED TO THE IMAGINATION 295

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