The Church of the Fathers

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Gracewing Publishing, 2002 - 679 страници
John Henry Newman's controversial The Church of the Fathers is published here for the first time in more than a century. It contains some of his earliest writings on fourth-century Christianity and is contemporary with the first Tracts of the Oxford Movement and The Arians of the Fourth Century. It was aimed at the general reader and is filled with extracts from the writings of the Church Fathers.
In 1833 the controversial Irish Church Temporalities Bill had been enacted by the British Parliament, a Bill that proposed to abolish ten of the twenty-two sees of the (Anglican) Church of Ireland. Newman accused the State of violating the ancient doctrine of Apostolic Succession, and in this book draws parallels between the situation facing the church in the fourth century and the Anglican church in his day.
The material was first written as a series of articles for the British Magazine; these were then revised and published in book form in 1840. Although unpopular with many of the British Establishment, it was popular with fellow Tractarians, who 'found in it for the first time the inspiration of the lives of the Saints, as real and human as if they were still alive, as indeed they were to Newman' (Meriol Trevor). A second edition was published in 1842.
 

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Съдържание

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
vii
THE CHURCH OF THE FATHERS
xxx
TRIALS OF BASIL 3
126
LABOURS OF BASIL 28
150
BASIL AND GREGORY
174
RISE AND FALL OF GREGORY 75
197
ANTONY IN CONFLICT 94
217
ANTONY IN CALM II 2
235
CONVERSION OF AUGUSTINE
264
DEMETRIAS 163
302
CHRONOLOGY OF THE CONTEMPORARY EVENTS 207
329
EDITORS NOTES
447
APPENDICES
573
ADVERTISEMENTS 1840 1857 1868
593
THE PENITENCE OF THEODOSIUS 1840
646
THE MARTYRS GERVASIUS
673

AUGUSTINE AND THE VANDALS 127
250

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Информация за автора (2002)

English clergyman John Henry Newman was born on February 21, 1801. He was educated at Trinity College, University of Oxford. He was the leader of the Oxford movement and cardinal after his conversion to the Roman Catholic Church. In 1822, he received an Oriel College fellowship, which was then the highest distinction of Oxford scholarship, and was appointed a tutor at Oriel. Two years later, he became vicar of St. Mary's, the Anglican church of the University of Oxford, and exerted influence on the religious thought through his sermons. When Newman resigned his tutorship in 1832, he made a tour of the Mediterranean region and wrote the hymn "Lead Kindly Light." He was also one of the chief contributors to "Tracts for the Times" (1833-1841), writing 29 papers including "Tract 90", which terminated the series. The final tract was met with opposition because of its claim that the Thirty-nine Articles of the Church of England are aimed primarily at the abuses of Roman Catholicism. Newman retired from Oxford in 1842 to the village of Littlemore. He spent three years in seclusion and resigned his post as vicar of St. Mary's on October 9, 1845. During this time, he wrote a retraction of his criticisms of the Roman Catholic Church and after writing his "Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine," he became a Roman Catholic. The following year, he went to Rome and was ordained a priest and entered the Congregation of the Oratory. The remainder of Newman's life was spent in the house of the Oratory that he established near Birmingham. He also served as rector of a Roman Catholic university that the bishops of Ireland were trying to establish in Dublin from 1854-1858. While there, he delivered a series of lectures that were later published as "The Idea of a University Defined" (1873), which says the function of a university is the training of the mind instead of the giving of practical information. In 1864, Newman published "Apologia pro Vita Sua (Apology for His Life)" in response to the charge that Roman Catholicism was indifferent to the truth. It is an account of his spiritual development and regarded as both a religious autobiography and English prose. Newman also wrote "An Essay in Aid of a Grammar of Assent" (1870), and the novels "Loss and Gain" (1848), Callista" (1856) and "The Dream of Gerontius" (1865). Newman was elected an honorary fellow of Trinity College, Oxford, in 1877 and was made cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1879. He died on August 11, 1890.

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