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CoNT1'Nu At Ive, n.s.. [from continuate.] An expression noting permanence or duration. To these may be added continuatives: as, Rome remains to this day; which includes at least two propositions, viz. Rome was, and Rome is. Watts's Logick. CoNT IN UA’roR. m. s. [from continuate.] He that continues or keeps up the series or succession. It seems injurious to Providence to ordain a way of production which should destroy the pro3ucer, or contrive the continuation of the species by the destruction of the continuator. Brown. To CONTI'NUE. v. n. [continuer, Fr. continuo, Latin.] 1. To remain in the same state, or place. The multitude continue with me now three days, and have nothing to eat. AMatthew. The popular vote Inclines here to continue, and build up here

A growing empire. AMilton. Happy, but for so happy ill secur'd Long to continue. Milton. He six days and nights Continued making. JMilton. 2. To last ; to be durable. Thy kingdom shall not continue. , 1 Samuel.

For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. Hebrews. They imagine that an animal of the longest duration should live in a continued motion, with

out that rest whereby all others continue. Brown's Wulgar Errours.

3. To persevere.

If ye continue in my word, then are ye my

disciples indeed. joln. Down rush'd the rain

Impetuous, and continued till the earth

No more was seen. Milton.

To Con T1'NU E. v.a. 1. To protract, or hold without interruption. O, continue thy loving kindness unto them! Psalmr. You know how to make yourself happy, by only continuing such a life as you have been long accustomed to lead. x Pope. 2. To unite without a chasm, or intervening substance. he use of the navel is to continue the infant unto the mother, and by the vessels thereof to convey its aliments and sustenance. Brown. The dark abyss, whose boiling gulph Tamely endur'd a bridge of wond’rous length, From hell continued, reaching th' utmost or Of this frail world. Milton's Par. Lott. Here Priam's son, Deiphobus, he found, Whose face apd limbs were one continued wound; Dishonest, with lopp'd arms, the youth appears, Spoil'd of his nose, and shorten’d of his ears. Dryden's AEneid. Where any motion or succession is so slow, as that it keeps not pace with the ideas in our minds, there the series of a constant continued succession is lost, and we perceive it not but with certain gaps of rest between. ocłe. CoNT1'N U Ed LY. adv. [from continued.] Without interruption; without ceasing. By perseverance, I do not understand a continuedy uniform, equal course of obedience, and such as is not interrupted with the least act of sin. Norrir. CoN r1'Nu ER. n.s. (from rontinue.] That which has the power of perseverance, I would my horse had the speed of your tongue, and so good a continuor. Shakspeare.

CoNT IN U'ity. n.s.. [continuitas, Lao 1. Connexion uninterrupted ; cohes: close union. It is certain, that in all bodies there is or petite of union, and evitation of solution a tinuity. Bacon's Nat. * A. the great lights there must be gi shadows, which we call reposes; becaus reality the sight would be tired, if it were: tracted by a continuity of glittering objects. Dr.It wraps itself about the flame, and to continuity hinders any air or nitre from cot: Addison en Io 2. [In physiqk.] That texture or coo sion of the parts of an animal box upon the destruction of which ther: said to be a solution of continuity. Qor As in the natural body a wound or solo of continuity is worse than a corrupt humous in the spiritual. Bacon's Eto The solid parts may be contracted by disso : ing their continuity; for a fibre, cut throot contracts itself. Artoto CoNT1'Nuous. adj. [continuus, Lati. Joined together without the intervent of any space. As the breadth of every ring is thus au. ed, the dark intervals must be .." the neighbouring rings become continueur, s are blended. Newton', Oh To whose dread expanse, l Continuous depth, and wond’rous length of cou Our floods are rills. Thomson's Summo To CONTO'RT. o. a. [centortus, Latico To twist; to writhe. C The vertebral arteries are variously “; 4

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Air seems to consist of spires cantorted i small spheres, through the interstices of whi the particles of light may freely pass. C# Cox to'RT 1 ox. m. s. (from conter: Twist; wry motion; flexure. Disruption they would be in danger of, or

a great and sudden stretch or centortion. 0. ow can she acquire those hundred groi. A and motions, and airs, the confortions of eve t muscular motion in the face 2 S: . CONTOUR. n.s. [French.] The outlin: the line by which any figure is defit: or terminated. I. A Co'N TRA. A. Latin preposition, usedili. A composition, which signifies against. I go CONTRABAND. adj. [co-tralao to Ital. contrary to proclamation.] Pre hibited; illegal; unlawful. C. If there happen to be found an irreveren: el Vox - łoś. or a thought too wanton, in the co o et them be staved or forfeited, like cartrio goods. Dryden's Failer, Pro s To Co's TRAR AND. v. a. [from the “I lo

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To him the angel with centracted *. s 4. To make a bargain. *

On him thy grace did liberty bestow;

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...so out first contracted, that, if ever found, o His head should pay the forfeit. 5. To betroth : to affiance. . ..o. The truth is, she and I, long since contracted, ...: Are now so sure that nothing can dissolve us. o o Stakspeare. She was a lady of the highest condition in that country, and contracted to a man of merit and o: quality. - - Tatler. oft. To procure; to bring ; to incur; to draw ; to get. ***. Of enemies he could not but contract good was or store, while moving in so high a sphere. " ... King Charles. He that but conceives a crime in thought, Contract; the danger of an actual fault. Dryd. Like friendly colours, found them both unite,

Dryden.

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light. rope. | Such behaviour we centract by having much * conversed with persons of high stations, Swift. ”. To shorten; as, life was contracted. ot. To epitomise; to abridge. . *To con r RA’c r. v. n. -. To shrink up; to grow short. - Whatever empties the yessels, gives room to * the fibres to contract. Aroutbooi on Alixents. ... To bargain; as, to contract for a quantity of provisions. o CoN or R A'cr. part, adj. [from the verb.] o Affianced ; contracted. First was he contract to lady Lucy; Your mother lives a witness to that vow. Shak.

* Co's r R Act. n.s.. [from the verb. An... * ciently accented on the last syllable.] 1 An act whereby two parties are brought together; a bargain ; a compact.

The agreement upon orders, by mutual con... traet, with the consent to execute them o com: mon strength, they make the rise of all civil towernments. - Tempo. Shall Ward draw contracts with a statesman's

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sk * Or Japhet pocket, like his grace, a will? Pope. 2. An act whereby a man and woman are betrothed to one another. Touch'd you the bastardy of Edward's children 2– —I did, with his contract with lady Lucy, 3. And his contract by deputy in France. Shakt. 3. A writing in which the terms of a bar... gain are included. CoN or R A 'cor E. D. Ness. n. J. [from contracted.]. The state of being contracted; contraction. Dict. CoN or R A c 1 I BI'll TY. n.s.. [from contractit...] Possibility of being contracted; quality of suffering contraction.,,..., By this continual contractibility and dilatability by different degrees of heat, the air is kept in a constant motion. Arbuthnot, cost RA’c r i B le. adj. [from contract.] - able of contraction. o air bladders, dilatable and contractible, are capable to be inflated . admission cf - bside at the expulsion of it. air, and to su Arbuthnot on Alimehtt. cos rr a’corro Les Pss. n. . [from contractible.] The quality of suffering contraction. - Dict. cost RA’ct 1 le. adj. [from contract.] Having the power of contraction, or of shortening itself. WQL, i.

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And each from each contract new strength and

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CoN TRA’ct to N. m. s. [contractio, Lat.] 1. The act of contracting or shortening. The main parts of the poem, such as the fable and sentiments, no translator can prejudice but by omissions or contractions. Pope. 2. The act of shrinking or shrivelling. Oil of vitriol will throw the stomach into involuntary contractions. Arbuthnot, 3. The state of being contracted, or drawn into a narrow compass. Some things induce a contraction in the nerves Placed in the mouth of the stomach, which is a great cause of appetite. - Bacon. Comparing the quantity of contraction and dilatation made by all the degrees of each colour, I found it greatest in the red. Newton. 4. [In grammar.] The reduction of two vowels or syllables to one. 5. Any thing in its state of abbreviation or contraction: as, the writing is fulf of contractions.

CoN T R Acro R. n. . [from contract.] One of the parties to a contract or bar. gain. Let the measure of your affirmation or denial be the understanding of your contractor, for he that deceives the buyer or the seller by speaking what is true, in a sense not understood by the other, is a thief. Taylor's Rule of Living Holy. All matches, friendships, and societies, are dangerous and inconvenient, where the contra-->

tors are not equals. L'Estrange. To CQNTRADI'CT. v. a. [contradico,

Latin.J 1. To oppose verbally; to assert the contrary to what has been asserted. It is not lawful to contradict a point of history which is known to all the world; as to make Hannibal and Scipio contemporaries with Alex. ander. Dryden. 2. To be contrary to ; to repugn; to oppose. No truth can contradict any truth. Hecker. I contradict your bans: If you will marry, make your loves to me. Slaloeare's King Lear. CoN TRADI’ct ER... n.s. (from contradict.] One that contradicts; one that opposes; an opposer. If no contradicter appears herein, the suit will surely be good. ...dyliff's Parergon. lf a gentleman is a little sincere in his representations, he is sure to have a dozen contro. dicters. Swift's Piew of Ireland. CoN T W A di’ct 10 N. n.s. (from contradict.] 1. Verbal opposition; controversial asser. tion. - That tongue, Inspir'd with centradiction, dūrst oppose A third part of the Gods. Milton's Par. Lest, 2. Opposition. Consider him that endureth such contradictica of sinners against himself, lest ye be wearied. Fiebrews. 3. Inconsistency with itself; incongruity in words or thoughts. Can he make deathless death That were Strange contradiction, which to God himself Impossible is held; an argument

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The apostle's advice, to be angry and sin not, was a contradiction in their philosophy. South. If truth be once perceived, we do thereby also perceive whatsoever is false in contradiction to it. Grew's Cosmologia. 4. Contrariety, in thought or effect. . . All contradictions grow in those minds, which neither absolutely climb the rock of virtue, nor freely sink into the sea of vanity. Sidney. Laws human must be made without contradiction unto any positive law inscripture. Hooker. CoN TRADI’ct 1ous. adj. [from contradict.] 1. Filled with contradictions; inconsistent. The rules of decency, of government, of justice itself, are so different in one ". from what they are in another, so party-coloured and contradictious, that one would think the species of men altered according to their climates. Collier. 2. Inclined to contradict; given to cavil. 3. Opposite to ; inconsistent with. ... Where the act is unmanly, and the expectation immoral, or contradictious to the attributes of God, our hopes we ought never to entertain. - Collier.

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CoN TRADI’ct of Y. n.s. A proposition
which opposes another in all its terms;
contrariety, inconsistency. .
It is common with princes to will contradicto-
rier; for it is the solecism of power to think to
command the end, and yet not to endure the
uleans. Bacon.
. To ascribe unto him a power of election, not
to chuse this or that indifferently, is to make the
same thing to be determined to one, and to be
not determined to one, which are contradictories.
Bramhall's Answer to Holocs.
CoN TRAD 1st I'N crio N. m. s. [from con-
tradistinguish.] Distinction by opposite
qualities. -
We must trace the soul in the ways of intel-
lectual actions; whereby we may come to the

distinct knowledge of what is meant by imagination, in contradistinction to some other powers. Glanvillo's Stosis, That there are such things as sins of infirmity, in contradistinction to those of presumption, is a truth not to be questioned. South. To CONTRADISTI'NGUISH. v. a. [from contra and distinguish ) To distinguish not simply by differential but by opposite qualities. The primary ideas we have peculiar to body, as contradistinguished to spirit, are the cohesion of solid, and :::::::::::::: separable parts, and a power of communicating motion by *::::.

These are our of: ideas of soul and body, as contradistinguished. Lake. CoNTRA fi’ssu RE. m.s.. [from contra and figure.] Contusions, when great, do usually produce 1 fissure or crack of the scull: either in the same part where the blow was inflicted, and then it is called fissure; or in the contrary part, in which case it obtains the name of controsure. Wiira, To CONTRAINDICATE. v.a. [contra and indico, Lat.] To point out some peculiar or incidental symptom or me. thod of cure, contrary to what the general tenour of the malady requires. Vomits have their use in this malody; but the age and sex of the patient, or other urgent of contraindicating symptoms, must be observed. Harvey on Consumptico CoN TRAiN Drc A^T Ion. n.s. from cotraindicate.] An indication or symptom, which forbids that to be done which the main scope of a disease points out at first. Quiry. I endeavour to give the most simple idea of the distemper, and the proper diet; abstracting from the complications of the first, or the controiocations to the second. Arbuthne; an iliseo. CoN TRAMU’R e. m. s. [contremur, Fr. In fortification, is an out-wall built about the main wall of a city. Chart. CoN TRAN I’re Nc Y. m. r. [from contra and nitens, Lat.] Reaction; a resistency against pressure. - Did. CoN TRA positrio N. m. s. [from contra and position.] A placing over against. Co NT R A R E GUI. A'R1 r Y. n.s.. [from twotra and regularity. Contrariety to rule. t is not only its not promoting, but its oposing, or at least its natural aptness to coso. the greatest and best of ends; so that it is ox o' properly an irregularity, as a centrar'ssissio. Morris CoNTRA'RIANT. adj. [contrariant, from contrarier, French..] Inconsistent; cotradictory: a term of law. The very depositions of witnesses thomos being false, various, centrariant, single, inconddent. Ayliff's Parso Co’NTR A Ries. n. . [from contrary.] In logick, propositions which destroyo. other, but of which the falsehood of one does not establish the truth of to other. If two universals differ in quality, they wo contrario; as, every vine is a tree, no co- .. : free. These can never be both true togeto but they may be both false. Wolf,' Lot. Co Not R Aki’ET Y. a. s. (from contrario Latin.]

1. Repugnance; opposition. . The will about one and the same thing may, in contrary respects, have contrary inclinations, and that without contrariety. PHooker. He which will perfectly recover a sick, and restore a diseased, body unto health, must not endeavour so much to bring it to a state of simple contrariety, as of fit proportion in contrariety, unto those evils which are to be cured. Hooter. Making a o the place of my memory, in her foulness I beheld Pamela's fairness; still looking on Mopsa, but thinking on Pool; .* * oy. It principally failed by late setting out, and by sume contrariety of weather at sea. otton. Their religion had more than negative contrariety to virtue. 1Joy of Piety. There is a contrariety between those things that conscience inclines to, and those that entertain the senses. outh. These two interests, it is to be feared, cannot be divided; but they will also prove opposite, and, not resting in a bare diversity, quickly rise into a contrariety. outh. There is nothing more common than contrariety of opinions; nothing more obvious than that one man wholly disbelieves what another only doubts of, and a third stedfastly believes and firmly adheres to. Locke. 2. Inconsistency; quality or position destructive of its opposite.

He will be here, and yet he is not here;

How can these contrarieties agree ? Shakspeare.

CoNTR A'Rily. adv. [from contrary.] 1. In a manner contrary. Many of them conspire to one and the same action, and all this contrarily to the laws of specifick gravity, in whatever posture the body be formed. Ray on the Creation. 2. Different ways; in different directions. Though all men desire happiness, yet their wills carry them so contrarily, and consequently some of them do what is evil. Locke. CoN TRA'R IN Ess. n. 4. [from contrary.] Contrariety; opposition. Dict. CoN TRA'Rious, adj.[from contrary.] Opposite; repugnant one to the other. God of our fathers, what is man! That thou towards him, with hand so various, Qr might I say contrarious, Temper'st thy providence through his short course? Milton. CoN TRA/R 1 ously. adv. [from contrariows.] Oppositely; contrarily. Many things, having full reference To one consent, may work contrariously. Shakt.

CoN TRA'RI wise. adv. [contrary and wise.] 1. Conversely. Divers, medicines in greater quantity move stool, and in smaller urine; and so, contrariwise, some in greater quantity move urine, and in smaller stool. Bacon's Nat. Hist. Every thing that acts upon the fluids, must at the same time act upon the solids; and contrarivire. Arbuthnot on Aliments. 2. ‘opoly The matter of faith is constant; the matter, •ontrariwise, of actions, daily changeable. Hooker. This request was never before made by any other 1. but, contrariwise, they were }. ble suitors to have the benefit and protection of the English laws. David on Ireland, ...The sun may set and rise; But we, contrari wire,

Sleep, after our short light, One everlasting night. Raleigh. CONTRARY. adj. [contrarius, Latin , I. Opposite; contradictory; not simply different, or not alike, but repugnant, so that one destroys or obstructs the other. Perhaps some thing, repugnant to her kind, By strong antipathy the soul may kill; But what can be contrary to the mind, Which holds all contraries in concord still? Lavies. 2. Inconsistent; disagreeing. He that believes it, and yet lives contrary to it, knows that he hath no reason for what he does. Tilletson. The various and contrary choices that men make in the world, do not argue that they do not all pursue good; but that the same thing is not good to every man alike. locke. 3. Adverse ; in an opposite direction. The ship was in the midst of the sea, tossed with the waves; for the wind was contrary. Matthew. Co'N TRARY. n. . [from the adjective.]

1. A thing of o qualities.

No contraries hold more antipathy, Than I and such a knave. Shakspeare. He sum Why contraries feed thunder in the cloud. Cowley's Davidsir. Honourshould be concern'd in honour's cause s That is not to be cur'd b contrarier, As bodies are, whose health is often drawn From rankest poisons. Southern's Oroonoso. * A proposition contrary to some other; a fact contrary to the allegation. The instances brought by our author are but slender proofs of a right to civil power and dominion in the first-born, and do rather shew the contrary. Locke. 3. On the Cost RARY. In opposition; on the o id: e pleaded still not guilty: The king's . , on the o s Urg'd on examinations, proofs, confessions, Of diverse witnesses. Shakop. Henry viii. If justice stood on the side of the single person, it ought to #. good men pleasure to see that right should take place; but when, on the contrary, the commonweal of a whole nation is

overborn by private interest, what good man but must lament * Swift.

4. To the Con TRARY. To a contrary

purpose; to an opposite intent. They did it, not for want of instruction to to. contrary.

- a Stillingfleet. To Co'N TRARY. v. a. [contrarier, Fr.] To oppose; to thwart; to contradict. When came to court, I was advised not to

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foot Sidney. CO NTRAST. m. f. [contraste, French.] Opposition and dissimilitude of figures, by which one contributes to the visibi. lity or effect of another. To Con TRA's T. v.a. [from the noun.] 1. To place in opposition, so that Onc figure shows another to advantage. 2. To show another figure to advantage by its colour or situation. The figures of *śr. must not be all on - 'u 2

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* side, that is, with their faces and bodies all turned the same way: but must contrast each other by their several positions. Dryden. CoN T R A v All A'rio N. n.s.. [from contra and vallo, Latin.] The fortification thrown up by the besiegers, round a city, to hinder the sallies of the garrison. When the late czar of Muscovy first acquainted himself with mathematical learning, he practised all the rules of circumvallation and controvallation at the siege of a town in Livonia. Watts. To CONTRAVE/NE. v. a. Leontra and venio, Lat.] To oppose; to obstruct; to baffle. CoN T R A v E'N E R. n.f. [from contravene.] He who opposes another. CoN T R A v ENTio N. n... [French..] Opposition. If o did not lend its name to stand in the gap, and to employ or divert these humours, they must of necessity be spent in contraventions to the laws of the land. Swift. CoN i RAYE/R v A. m. s. [rontra, against, and yerva, a name by which the Spaniards call black hellebore ; and, perhaps, sometimes poison in general.] A species of birthwort growing in Jamaica, where it is much used as an alexiphar

mick. , Miller. CoN T RecTA’t 1o N. m. ... [contrectatio, Lat.] A touching or handling. Dict.

CoN TRI'BUTAR Y. ads. [from con and tributary..] Paying tribute to the same sovereign. Thus we are engaged in the objects of geometry and arithmetick; yea, the whole mathematicks must be contributary, and to them all nature pays a subsidy. Glanville's Scopsis.

To CONTRIBUTE. v. a. [contribuo, Latin J To give to some common stock; to advance toward some common design. England contributes much more than any other of the allies. Addison on the War. His master contributed a great sum of money to the Jesuits church, which is not yet quite finished. Addison on Italy. To Co NTRI'BUT E. v. n. To bear a part; to have a share in any act or effect. Whatever praises may be given to works of judgment, there is not even a single beauty in them to which the invention must not contribute. Pope's Essay on Homer. CoN TRIBU'r Ion. n.s.. [from contribute.] 1. The act of promoting some design in conjunction with other persons. 2. That which is given by several hands for some common purpose. It hath ple *d them of Macedonia to make a certain contribution for the poor saints. Rom. Parents owe their children hot only material subsistence for their body, but much more spisitual contributions for their mind. Digby. Beggars are now maintained by voluntary confrihuttons. Graunt's Bills of Mortality. That which is paid for the support of an army lying in a country. The people 'twixt Philippi and this ground Do stand but in a forc'd affection; For they have grudg’d us contribution. Shako. to Nor Rio But I y E. ad;. LFrom contribute.] That has the power or quality of pro

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moting any purpose in concurrence with other motives. As the value of the promises renders then most proper incentives to virtue, so the manner of proposing we shall find also highly contriotive to the same end. Decay of Pio. CoN T R is Butor. m. s. [from contribute.] One that bears a part in some common design; one that helps forward, or exerts his endeavours to some end, in conjunction with others. I promis'd we would be contributors; And bear his charge of wooing, whatsoe'er.

Staifar, . A grand contributor to our dissentions is for $1011. Decay a Play.

Art thou a true lover of thy countryfieal: for its religious and civil liberties, and a chestul contributor to all those public expences who have been thought necessary to secure them! After The whole people were witnesses to the build ing of the * and tabernacle; they were ill contributers to it. Forêt. CoNT RI's U Tory. adj. [from contribute Promoting the same end; bringing as: sistance to some joint design, orincreas: to some common stock. To CONTRI'STATE. A. a. [&ntrio, Latin.] To sadden; to make sorrowful; to make melancholy. Not used. Blackness and darkness are but privatives, and therefore have little or no activity: somewhat they do contristate, but very little. Baron. CoNTR 1st A’rios. n.s.. [from contristated The act of making sad; the state of being made sad ; sorrow; heaviness of heart; sadness; sorrowfulness; gloomi. ness ; grief; moan ; mournfulness; trouble; discontent ; melancholy. Not used. Incense and nidorous smells, such as were of sacrifices, were thought to intoxicate the brain, and to dispose men to devotion; which the: may do by a kind of sadness and contriii-vio the spirits, and partly also by heating and coing them. Bacon's Nat. HCONTRITE. adj. [contritus, Latin.] 1. Bruised; much worn. 2. Worn with sorrow; harassed with th sense of guilt; penitent. In the books of divines, contrite is sorrowful for on, from the love of God and desire of pleasing him ; and attrite is sorrow:for sin, from the fear of punishment. I Richard's body have interred now; And on it have bestow'd more centrite tears, Than from it issued forced drops of blood. - Säuäpear.'. Hoy"

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