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Sec. 1. Vol. t From March 4, 1789, to March 2,1793.

Vol. 2. From December 2,1793, to March 3, 1797. Vol. 3. From May 15,1797, lo March 3,1801. Vol. 4. From December 7,1801, to March 27,1804. Vol. 5. From November 5,1804, to March 3, 1807. Vol. 6. From October 26, 1807, to March 3, 1809. Vol. 7. From May 22, 1809, to March 3, 1811. Vol. 8. From Norember 4, 1811, to March 3, 1813. Vol. 9. From May 24, 1813, to March 2, 1815. Sec. 2. This Journal from March 3,1815, to March 3, 1847, is contained in 34 volumes, octavo, being one for each session. Each volume having an index.

CLASS No. 5.

THE LEGISLATIVE JOURNAL OF THE SENATE OF THE UNITED
STATES, FROM MARCH 4, 1789, TO MARCH 3, 1847.
This Journal as re-printed by order of the Senate, from the commencement to
March 3,1815, is contained in 5 volumes octavo :—
Sec. 1. Vol. 1. From March 4, 1789, to March 2, 1793, containing 5 separate in-
dexes to its contents.

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volumes octavo, being one for each Legislative session. Each volume having an index.

CLASS No. 6.

THE EXECUTIVE JOURNAL OF THE SENATE, FROM MARCH 4, 1789, TO MARCH 3, 1847. This Journal, from the commencement to March 3,1829, from all of which the injunction of secrecy has been removed, has been printed in 3 volumes octavo, by order of the Senate. Each volume having an index. Sec. 1. Vol. 1. From March 4,1789, to March 3, 1805. Vol. 2. From March 4, 1805, to March 3, 1815. Vol. 3. From March 4,1815, lo March 3,1829. See. 2. Those parts of the Executive Journal from which the injunction of secrecy has been removed, from March 4,1829, lo March 3, 1847, will be found printed as an appendix to the Legislative Journal of the session when the injunction was removed.

See. 3. The Executive Journal of the Senate from March 4,1829, to March 3, 1847, from which the injunction of secrecy has not been removed, is contained alone in manuscript record-books, and is accessible only to the President, to the Members, the Secretary and certain officers of the Senate. No extract from thus record can be furnished, except by special order of the Senate.

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iwai ir. of the Goverrmec:. will be sccai a: length apoB the jow•als; a brief stateaaeaf of the nhjeer of ererc report or r»—■■■■ afloat from the several Executive Departments and B reaiii is entered upon the Journal of the Hwise to which it may be directed; act* aad resolationa of the Legia'-attrrea are euteied apon the Journals: schedules of the electoral votes fer President and Vice President are placed upon the Journals of both Houses, and the names of the members with those of the Htatfea which they represent are entered on the Journals of the respective Houses on the days of their first attendance at each session.

The volumes of Journals bare indexes referring to the names of peti timers, members, Htates, Executive Departments, Presidents' messages, committees, motions, resolutions and bills with references to all the proceedings thereon, and generally to all the subjects treated of in the body of the Journal.

liut with the exception of the cases above stated, the reasons for or ground* of Legislation, from their voluminous nature and their number, could not he embodied within the narrow compass of the Journals.

These lire contained in the manuscript files and records, the printed documents, and the reported speeches of the members of the two Houses to be sought for from various sources.

The manuscript files and records are preserved in the office of the House in which they may have been presented, or to which they may have been communicated. The printed documents and speeches, however, require a more particular description and reference, which will be given as concisely as practicable.

CLASS No. 8.

EMBRACING THE DOCUMENTS ORDERED TO BE PRINTED BY THE TWO HOUSES OF CONGRESS SINCE MARCH 4,1789.

These consist of messages from the President, reports from the several Executive Departments and Bureaus, reports of committees of the two Houses, with documents and tables communicated therewith, as well as memorials, petitions, resolutions of State Legislatures, and all other papers printed under the order of either House. These will be arranged into sections:—

Sec. 1. The Folio Edition Of State Papers Published Under Joint Resolutions Of Congress, And Printed By Messrs. Gales & Seaton, Consists Of 21 Volumes.

These documents were selected with much care from the mass of manuscript and printed documents, papers and books in the offices of the two Houses, from all sources, and upon all subjects, having deficiencies supplied from the archives and records of the Executive Departments. These were divided into ten different classes, according to their nature or subject, viz.:— 4 vols. Foreign Relations. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to Feb. 28,1797.

Vol. 2, from Feb. 28,1797, to Feb. 19,1807.
Vol. 3, from Feb. 19, 1807, to March 3,1815.
Vol. 4, from March 3,1815, to May 3,1822

2 vols. Indian Affairs. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to Nov. 18,1814.

Vol. 2, from Nov. 18,1814, to March 1,1827.

3 vols. Finances. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to April 29,1802.

Vol. 2, from April 29,1802, to March 2.1815. Vol. 3, from March 2, 1815, to March 12,1S22. 2 vols. Commerce and Navigation. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789. to Feb. 9,1815, Vol. 2, from Feb. 9, 1815, to Feb. 25, 182a

2 vols. Military Affairs. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to Feb. 25,1819.

Vol. 2, from Feb. 25,1819, to Feb. 28,1825. 1 vol. Naval Affairs. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to March 5, 1825. 1 vol. Post-Office. Vol. 1, from March 4, 1789, to March 2,1833.

3 vols. Public Lands. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to Feb. 27,1809.

Vol. 2, from Feb. 27, 1809, to Feb. 14,1815.
Vol. 3, from Feb. 14,1815. to May 26,1824.

1 vol. Claims. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to March 3, 1823.

2 vols. Miscellaneous. Vol. 1, from March 4,1789, to Feb. 16, 1809.

Vol. 2, from Feb 16,1809, to March 3,1823.

There will also be included in this section the two additional volumes on Public Lands that were printed by Duff Green, by order of the Senate, viz.:—

2 vols, on Public Lands. Vol. 4, from May 26, 1824, to Jan. 2, 1823.

Vol. 5, from Jan. 2,1823, to Jan. 21,1834.

In the compilation of these state papers, care was taken to render each class as complete as practicable. The authority for the publication, and the manner of proceeding in the execution of the work, will be found stated at the beginning of the first volume on Foreign Relations. As it purports to be a selection of those documents and papers, it will not, of course, be expected to embrace every document and paper presented in or communicated to either House of Congress, as these can alone be found in the archives of Congress; but it was intended that they should embrace every important document of the classes to which they respectively belong, considered valuable as precedents for the future action of the Government, or material in its political and statistical history, or as establishing principles in the allowance or rejection of private pecuniary claims against the Government, or in the settlement of private land claims.

These state papers were printed under the authority of the act of Congress "making provision for a subscription to a compilation of congressional documents," approved March 2, 1831, and continued under the joint resolution of March 2,1833, which limited the continuation to eight volumes, and which, with those previously authorized, made twenty-one volumes. These were disposed of by a joint "resolution directing the distribution of a compilation of congressional documents, and for other purposes," approved July 10,1832.

CLASS No. 9.

Sec. 1 WILL EMBRACE THE DOCUMENTS PRINTED IN OCTAVO FORM BY ORDER OF THE SENATE, during each session, from March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1847. These are numbered as they are sent to the printer; loose copies are furnished to the members of both Houses of Congress and other public functionaries, and sometimes extra copies for distribution, as they are printed; and other copies are retained and bound, in as many volumes as necessary, with copious indexes, for preservation, when the printing of each session is completed. The more important of these printed documents will be found reprinted, under their appropriate heads, in the folio state papers, where they will be found more conveniently, in connection with kindred subjects which had accumulated from March 4,1789, to the time to which the class they belong to was reprinted, as stated in the preceding section; from which time, recourse must be had to these bound documents of each session—every session having a separate index.

In addition to these documents, the bills and resolutions of the Senate are printed in folio form, and distributed nearly as the octavo documents. Several copies of these have been bound into volumes, with indexes, since 1824-5.

CLASS No. 10.

Sec. 1 WILL EMBRACE THE DOCUMENTS PRINTED IN OCTAVO FORM BY ORDER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, from March 4,1789, to March 3,1847. These are divided into two separate series, each being numbered as sent to the printer. One series consists of the reports of committees of the House of Representatives, with their accompanying documents; and the other series consists of messages, reports, and documents, from the Executive Departments, and all other documents ordered to be printed by that House. Loose copies are furnished to members of both Houses of Congress, and other public functionaries, and sometimes extra copies for distribution, as they are printed; and other copies are retained and bound, each series separately, (in as many volumes as necessary, with separate indexes,) for preservation, when the printing of each session is completed. The more important of these documents, of both series, will be found reprinted, under their appropriate heads, in the folio state papers, as mentioned in the preceding section, as far as they extend; from which time, recourse must be had to these bound documents of each session—every session having a separate index for each series of these documents.

In addition to these documents, the bills and joint resolutions of the House of Representatives have been printed in folio form,' and distributed as the octavo documents. Several copies of these have been bound, with indexes, since 1825.

CLASS No. 11. DEBATES IN CONGRESS: Embracing the speeches made in the two Houses of Congress, from March 4, 1789, to March 3,1847.

When it is desired to find the discussion in either House upon any particular subject, it is necessary first to ascertain from the journal of the House in which the discussion has taken place, when, or on what days, such subject was under consideration in the House, and then seek for the publication of the proceedings of those days in the public newspapers that published such debates, or in the various compilations of debates, as either may be found to embrace the time at which the discussion may have taken place.

Sec. 1. The compilation of Joseph Gales, senior, in 2 volumes, contains the debates in the first Congress, 1789 to 1791.

Sec. 2. The Congressional Register, or History of the Proceedings and Debates of the first House of Representatives, by Thomas Lloyd, 1789-91.

Sec. 3. History of Congress, exhibiting a classification of the proceedings of the Senate and House of Representatives, from March 4,1789, to March 3,1793.

Sec. 4. Debates in the Congress of the United States on the bill for repealing the law "for the more convenient organization of the courts of the United States Albany, 1802. (State Department.)

Sec. 5. Debates in the House of Representatives of the United States on questions involved in the British treaty of 1794, (Jay's treaty:) Philadelphia, 1803. (State Department.)

Sec. 6. Debates in the House of Representatives of the United States on the Seminole war, in January and February, 1819. (State Department.)

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