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CHAPTER CXXXI.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD HARDWICKE TILL THE DEATH OF QUEEN

CAROLINE.

Censure on Lord Hardwicke for his Conduct to Thomson the Poet, 41.

Lord Hardwicke as an Equity Judge, 43. Foundation of his great Ex-

cellence, 43. His Demeanour in Court, 45. His Judgments, 47. Lord

Hardwicke's Chancellorship considered the Golden Age of Equity, 49. No

Decree of Lord Hardwicke reversed, 49. His Demeanour on the Woolsack,

and Manner of disposing of the judicial Business of the House of Lords, 49. All

Persons believing in a God may be Witnesses, and are to be sworn in the Manner

binding on their Consciences, according to their own peculiar religious Notions,

51. The Writer, but not the Receiver, of a Letter, may obtain an Injunction

against publishing it, 54. Q. as to Rule, that an Abridgment of a Book may

be published against the Consent of the Author, 56. Punishment for marrying

a Ward of Chancery without leave of the Chancellor, 56. Law of Paraphernalia,

57. Woman holding Property under her Husband's Will to go to another if

she marries again, bound to answer a Bill of Discovery as to whether she has

taken a second Husband, 58. Bond given by a married Man to a Female whom

he had seduced, she knowing that he was a married Man, void, 58. The Laws

of England do not extend to Isle of Man, 59. Lord Hardwicke's Decision

respecting the Effect of Attainder for Treason on Scotch entailed Estates, 60.

Censure upon as regards Law Reform, 62. Commission to inquire into Fees

in Courts of Justice after ten Years makes a Report, 62. Abuse of writing only

a few Words on a folio Page of Law Proceedings to increase Fees, 63. This

Abuse pointed out by the Report, but allowed to remain unremedied, 63. Lord

Hardwicke's laudable Exercise of judicial Patronage, 63. Charge against him

of stopping the Promotion of other Judges to the Peerage that he might be the

sole Law Lord, 64. Lord Hardwicke in Politics, 64. Disputes between

George II. and Frederick Prince of Wales, 65. Lord Hardwicke selected to

deliver a Reprimand from the King to the Prince, 65. Bill to punish the

Citizens of Edinburgh for the Murder of Captain Porteous, 67.

Rebellion of 1745, 93. Message from the Crown, and Address, 93. Sir R. Wal-

pole (Lord Orford*s) Speech in the House of Lords, 93. Apathy in the public

Mind, 95. New Law of Treason, 95. Character of Walpole as a Minister, 95.

Opposed by the Duke of Bedford, 96. Impolicy of the new Law, 97. Breaking

out of the Rebellion, 98. King's Return from abroad, 98. His Indifference, 98.

King's Speech written by Lord Hardwicke, 99. State of the Public Mind, 100.

Success of the Rebels, 101. Q, What would have happened if the Rebels had
marched on from Derby to London? 101. Ministerial Crisis, 102. Victory of
Culloden, 102. Trial of the rebel Lords, 102. Lord Hardwicke's Address to
them, 103. Sentence passed by Lord Hardwicke, 105. Lord Lovat, 107. Lord
Hardwicke's preliminary Address to him, 107. Unjustifiable Length of the
Speech in pronouncing Sentence, 108. Scandalous Execution of Charles Radcliffc
on an old Attainder, 108. Excellent Measure of Lord Hardwicke for abolishing
hereditary Jurisdictions in Scotland, 109. He is thwarted by the Scotch Judges,
111. His Speech in Defence of it, 112. Power of Parliament over the Articles

of Union, 112. Lord Hardwicke's " Coercion Bill," 114. Highland Garb to be

abolished, 115. Effects of this Bill, 117. Quiet Times after the Rebellion, 118.

Lord Hardwicke's Speech on the Mutiny Bill, 119.

His Estrangement from Literature and Men of Letters, 165. His Letter to

lord Kames, 167. Whether a good classical Scholar? 168. His Poetry, 169.

No personal Anecdotes of him, 169. Observation upon him by Horace Wal-
pole, 17a Dailies Harrington, 170. Lord Chesterfield, 171. His Marriage
happy, 171. Character of Lady Hardwicke, 171. Absurd Charge against her,
172. His Children, 172. His present Representative, 178.

CHAPTER CXL.

CONTINUATION Or THE LIFE OF LORD NORTHINGTON TILL HE RESIGNED THE GREAT

SEAL,

Accession of George III., Henley elevated to the Dignity of Lord Chancellor, and
Earl of Northington, 199. His Application to the King to abolish after-dinner
Sittings in Court, 199. He adheres to Lord Bute, 200. Resignation of Lord
Bute, and Ministry of Duke of Bedford, 200. Ascendency of George Gren-
ville, 201. Lord Northington Lord High Steward at the Trial of Lord Byron

CHAPTER CXLI.

CONCLUSION or THE LIFE OF LORD NORTHINGTON.

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