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a third in my third Dialogue." How is this reconcileable with the gross abuse thrown out on Walpole in this piece, with the sneer upon him as a glorious minister, the insinuations (as it seems) respecting his wife, the scurrilous lines on his son Horace, and the mention of W. and Yonge as only

“ Foul copies of his face and tongue ?” Is this making him another compliment in his thiril Dialogue ?

Ver. 81. Thy nobles slaves, &c.] Can it be supposed that this vulgar abuse ever escaped the pen of Pope? Or that the author of the sublime passage at the end of the first Dialogue of 1738, could have sunk into the miserable libeller who produced these lines ?

Ver. 93. Whatever his religion, &c.] On this passage Mr. Bowles appears afterwards to have changed his opinion. In his Life of Pope, p. cxiv, he says, in reference to these lines : “ Although they might be construed to apply to the Prince of Wales, they were more probably addressed to the Chevalier St. George, commonly called the Pretender, who came to England four years afterwards to claim the crown. He was now in his twentieth year ; and the satirist seems to think there could be no hope left to the country but by again resorting to the exiled heir of the Stuarts."—" It appears therefore, that notwithstanding his joining any party against the Court, Pope continued in the same principles which he inherited from his father.” Conceiving that Pope could never have degraded himself by this piece of vulgar declamation, I willingly resign it to any interpretation that Mr. Bowles, or any one else, may be pleased to put upon it.

FRAGMENTS

AND FUGITIVE PIECES;

ATTRIBUTED TO POPE.

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FRAGMENTS.

THE FOURTH EPISTLE

OF THE

FIRST BOOK OF HORACE'S EPISTLES.

[This Satire on Lord Bolingbroke, and the praise bestowed on him in a letter to Mr. Richardson, where Mr. Pope says,

“ Their sons shall blush their fathers were thy foes,” being so contradictory, probably occasioned the former to be suppressed

Warton. Mr. Bowles has omitted the following piece, because “ he cannot think Pope would write the concluding lines on himself," v. Bowles's ed. vol. ii. p. 385, in which opinion the present editor perfectly agrees with him. But it may be observed, that this piece is as likely to be Pope's, both from the sentiment and the manner of its execution, as the Satire of One thousand seven hundred and forty, which Mr. Bowles has published, and is probably by the same author.)

SAY, St. John, who alone peruse
With candid eye, the mimic muse,
What schemes of politics, or laws,
In Gallic lands the patriot draws!
Is then a greater work in hand,

5 Then all the tomes of Haines's band !

NOTES.

Ver. 1. Say, &c.]

AD ALBIUM TIBULLUM.
Albi, nostrorum sermonum candide judex,
Quid nunc te dicam facere in regione Pedana ?

Scribere, quod Cassi Parmensis opuscula vincat ?"
VOL. VI.

26

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