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State of the BAROMETER, in inches and decimals,

and of Farenheit's THERMOMETER, in the open air, taken in the morning before sun-rise, and at noon; and the quantity of rain-water fallen, in inches and decimals, from Jan. 26. to Feb. 25. 1810, in the vicinity of Edinburgh,

Weather.

36

4 21

5 32

9 20

High Water at LEITH,

FOR MARCH.

Morn. | Even. Days. H: M. H. M. Th. 1 10 51 11 29 Fr. 2

0 2 Sa. 3

0 31 0 59 Su. 4 1 22 1 46 M. 5 2 9 2 30 Tu. 6 2 49 3 10 W. 7

3 28 3 46
Th. 8 4 3
Fr. 9 4 37

4 55
Sa. 10 5 12
Su. 11 5 48 6 9
M. 12 6 31 6 56
Tu.13

7 25 7 59
W. 14 8 37
Th. 15 10 1 10 41
Fr. 16 11 14 11 4+
Sa. 17

09 Su. 18 0 31 051. M. 19

Barom. Thermom. Rain. Jan.

M.

N. in. Pts. 26 30.24 : 39 42 27

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Cloudy Ditto Clear Showers Cloudy Rain Cloudy Clear Cloudy Clear Ditto Rain Cloudy Clear Ditto Ditto Cloudy Ditto Snow Snow Clear Ditto Ditto Snow Clear Ditto Cloudy Sleet Ditto Showers Snow

ook

1 30 Tu. 20 1 49

2 S W. 21 2 25 43 Th. 22 3 2 20 Fr, 23 3 40 3 58 Sa. 24 4 18 4 41 Su. 25 4 59

5 22 M. 26 5 46 Tu. 27 6 41

7 13 W. 28 7 4.9 8 30 Th.29 9 14 9 56 Fr. 30 10 36 11 il Sa. 31 11 42

30.25 33 28 30.23 | 36 41 29 30.25 36 39 0.04 30 30.3 37 41 31 29.9 44 48 0,08

29.9 50 54 82

29.9 39 44 3 29.89 | SO 34 4 29.85 | 29 41 5 29.8 40 46 6 29.7 45 51 0.12 7 29.81 46 49 8 29.75 | 46 50 9 29.95 48 59 10 29.96 | 36 50 11 30. 32 37 12 29.7 31 35 13 29.2 32 35 0.02 14 29.5 32 36

1.1 15 30.45 11 32 16 30.09 15 32 17 30.22 12 31 18 30. 30 38 0.02 19 30.3 18 36 20 30.35 18 36 21 29.9

25 37 22 29.82 36 41 0.02 23 29.35 39 45 0.01 24 29.4

47 0.03 215 29.31 31 35 0.02

II11||||||||||||

6 12

MOON'S PHASES

For MARCH.
Apparent time at Edinburg

New Moon, 5. 1. 22. eve
First Quart. 13.2. 44. eve
Full Moon, 21. 2. 25. mor
Last Quart. 28. 3. 31. mo

Quantity of Rain 1.46

March 7. Shortest Twilight.

10. Court of Session ses.
21. Day and night equal,

:

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THE

Scots Magazine,

AND

EDINBURGH LITERARY MISCELLANY,

For FEBRUARY 1810.

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tory.

View of Kelso, from MAXWELL nave, in which there is an arch which HEUGH.

communicated between the cloister

. and the body of the church. Small, THIS view of Kelso is from the op- fragments of pillars, antique stones,

posite side of the river, and in- &c. evidently belonging to this edi. cludes the bridge and the abbey.. fice, have been found scattered, often Kelso, and its vicinity, are celebrated at considerable distances from it. throughout Scotland for the various beauties both of nature and art which they exhibit ; and few spots, perhaps, Monthly Memoranda in Natural Hisa connected with it, display a greater variety of striking objects than are to be found here represented. We have

1810. Feb. 1-8. S

SINCE the snow 2 full view of the new and elegant

o disappeared, the bridge, completed in 1805, instead weather has been genial and pleasant. of the one which was carried away The crocus is coming into flower : big an inundation about six years be the flowers of the white colt’s-foot fore. The view includes also a (Tussilago alba) are expanded : the tull view of the abbey of Kelso, a hazel-tree has shewn its catkins; and most ancient and venerable edifice. hepaticas are flowering. This abbey was founded in 1128, by -. 10. The skylark has begun his . St David, king of Scotland, for an or- morning song der of monks called Tyronenses, who .- 11. The wind suddenly shifted Fiere transported hither from Rox- into the east, and the mercury in the burgh, wbere they had been settled barometer soon fell a whole inch.. two years before. It was dedicated This was followed by a great deal of to St Mary and John the Evangelist. snow on the 13th, and by intense It was liberally endowed, and enjoyed frost for several following days. Tery great privileges. It is built in .--. 14. Late in the evening the the Saxon style. There are still re- mercury in the thermometer was at maming the southern and western tow. 16o; lower than it has been since the er, which stood at the intersection of remarkable coid in January 1809. the transverse parts of the building, 17. A gradual thaw commenced. and a part of the south wall of the 24. During the past week the snow

and

and ice have disappeared ; and the certaining, in ample detail, the ancient
weather has now become favourable to history of North-Britain..
the operations of the husbandman and But, though many novel views were
the horticulturist. The skylark,throstle, given, and a thousand uncertainties
and other song-birds, which during were ascertained, that volume has not
the late snow-storm entirely sušpend been formally controverted. Every
ed their carols, have now resumed intelligent person has acquiesced, in its
them with increased vigour.

moral certainties, however new, and unIt is a fact perhaps worthy of re- expected, except Doctor Jamieson acording, that the Stapelia grandiflora, lone, who has attempted to controvert which Howeted in the dry-stove of the them, in his Prefatory Dissertation on Botanic Garden here, late in the au- the Scotish language: Yet, he, who tumn, has completely ripened its seeds. reasons against facts, shews little discre. Some other species of Stapólia produce tion, as a logician ; and he, who pretheir pods readily; but we have not tends to out-argue demonstration, only before heard of S. grandiflora doing evinces that, as a lexicographer, he $0.

loves theory better than truth. I shall 28th Feb. 1810.

N. not, however, make, in this place, any

reply : There will be found, in the subsequent volume, a thousand facts,

which contradict his etymological spePreface to the Second Volume of Mr culations, on the Scotish language, Chalmers's CALEDONIA.

which pever existed, in a separate state, rŚce Scottish Literary İntelligence.) viously proved, by argument, and fact,

from the old English; as had been preIt is wise to observe occurrents, and let in the Prefatory Disquisitions to my

nothing remarkable escape us: the su: edition of Sir David Lyndsay's Poems. pinity of elder days hath left so much in silence ; or time hath so martyred

From the ancient annals of Scotland, the records ; that the most industrious this second volume proceeds, after some heads find it no easy work, to erect & introductory intimations, to give its new BRITANNIA. Sir F. Brown, topographical history, in a sequence of

shires; beginning with the most southIN prosecution of tny plan; fot iefto ern, and proceeding to the

northern, ving the difficulties, settling the dis- in á tégular consécution. The locali putes, and clearing the obscurities of ties of each shire will be submitted to the history, and antiquities, of Scot- the public, in eight sections: The 1st land, I now presume, to lay before the will treat of its name ; the 2d of its sin Public the second volume of my Cale-ination and extent ; the 3d of its nats donia.

ral objects; the 4th of its antiquities For effecting those several objects, the 5th of its establishment, as a shire in my first volume, I treated of the the 6th of its civil history; the 7th a fore ancient history of Scotland, in its agricultore, manufactures, and trade four Books ;, the first, containing the and the 8th of its ecclesiastical history Roman period, and ending with 446 Thus, under those several heads, vi A.D.; the second, comprehending the be found, I trust, in this volume, muc Pictish period, and closing with 843 that is new, and something that is i A.D.; the third, treating of the Scotish teresting, froin the various sources affairs, and finishing in 1097 A.D.; authentic documents, and the inte and the fourth book, discussing the co- gent correspondence of the parochi lonization, and history, of the Scoto- mitisters; which are now laid befo Saxon people, and concluding with the judicious eyes of the inquisiti 1307 A.D.: The four books thus as. reader. Such a reader will percei

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