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a. The existence of God as a lawgiver inferred from the ex- PAGE

istence of conscience............................................... , 13

a". From conscience as to self, Ž 1.................................. 13

b'. From conscience as to others, Ž 3.............................. 15

ck. From conscience as to abstract right and wrong, Ž 4...... 16

b. The existence of God as an unconditioned executive, punish-

ing the violators of His law, inferred from the qualities of

conscience............................................................... 16

a'. From its action...................................................... 16

a”. Incessant, 4.5 ......................................... . © & to e o O & © 16

b”. Unconditioned by time, Ž 7...... © . & s is g o e o is so o e o 'o o is a e o os e o g o o 18

co Unconditioned by matter, 3.12............................. 25

a8. From the nature of conscience itself, Ž 13....... 25

b°. From analogy............................................ 25

a". Recalled impressions, Ž 14..................... 25

b°. Dreaming, 3 15.................................... 26

co. Insanity, 3 16...................................... 28

d”. Comatose state, 3.17.............................. 28

e'. Lust, %21 ...................~e s to e o s to t t e o 'o o e s is a e s as a o e = 33

bl. From the spiritual consequences of a violation of con-
Science, e.g. remorse, 3 22..................................... 35

cl. From the physical consequences of a violation of con-

science, 326 ...................................................... 42

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of details, 485........................................................ 56

C H A P T E R IV.

FROM MATTER.

a. Universal belief in some eternal existence, Ž 41.................. 64

b. The atheist’s eternity equally objectionable with the the-

ist's, 342............................................................... 64

c. Incomprehensibility of eternity not conclusive, & 43............. 65

d. Desolateness of a godless universe, 344......... ................... 66

C H A P T E R. W.

FROM IDESIGN IN NATURE.

a. The ocean........................ ............................................ 70

a". The sea-breeze, 446........ ....................................... 70

b'. The ocean salts, 447............................................... 70

ck. The Gulf-Stream, Ż 49............... • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73

b. Climate....................................................................... 80

a!. Its alternations as producing contentment and patriot-

ism, 352........................................................... . 80

b'. As producing home virtues, 3.58................................ 81

c'. As necessitating labor, 355...................................... 87

d". As generating energy, patience, and sense of the beauti-

ful, & 56 ....................................... to e o & © c e s to e s is e o e o 'o e o & © 89

c. Watering the earth, & 60................................................. 93

d. Soil, 468.............................................. ...................... 105

e. Fuel, 470....................... * c e s s e s to e e o os e o e o 'o e o so o e o 'o e o 'o e e s e a e e o e o e s to o e o e a 108

C H A P T E R W I.

FROM THE PROGRESS OF SOCIETY.

a. Arts and sciences, 372................................................... 113

b. Reproduction, % 74......................................................... 115

c. Written history, 375.............................................. * g o e o 'o a o 115
phenomena, Ž86..................... & & © to £ to so to o o os e o 'o to so e o 'o e & © e g g g g g g g g to 131

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al. That what appear gratuitous pain and sorrow are often

inflicted on the animal creation, % 86....................... 131

bl. That man is endowed with freedom of will and action,

which, however, he frequently perverts to his own

ruin, 386........................................................... 181

cl. That human conduct is to a great degree affected by

what are called “accidents,” i.e. events not to be ac-

counted for by any general law, 386 ....................... 131

c. Reconciliation of these apparent contradictions, Ž 87............ 132

al. The attempt to reconcile them by the hypothesis of an

imperfect Creator illogical, & 87.............................. 132

bi. They may be reconciled, however, by the following as-

sumptions, # 91..................... • * * * * * * * * * * * c e s & so e o 'o e s e e o os e o e a 134

a”. Man is in a state of exile from God, & 91................. 134

b°. The human heart, so far from maintaining a com-

munion with God, is more and more inclined to

place its affections on things earthly, 3 97............ 142

PAGE

*. There is a future retribution which demands that the

free agency of those subject to it should remain

unimpaired, while there are such general influ-
ences about them as will promote patience, sub-

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|B O O K II.

S KEPTIC A.L THE ORIES.

C H A P T E R I.

“AN IMPERFECT CREATOR.”

a. Inability of the finite to measure, Ž 102............................. 152

b. Incapacity of the infinite for measurement, Ž 105................ 156

c. Supposing, however, apparently irreconcilable contradictions
and imperfections exist, % 108.................................... 161

al. They cannot overcome the positive evidence of Almighty

wisdom and goodness, # 108.................................. 161

bi. They are reconcilable with the Divine perfections, Ž 109, 162

a”. As necessary to moral agency, Ž 110.................... 163

b”. As ordained of God, as forming part of a scheme of

all others the best and most perfect, Ż 110......... 163

a8. Necessitarian view of moral evil, Ž 113........... 168

Objections:

ał. It renders human exertion useless, & 115.... 172

b%. It enthralls God himself, Ž 115................ 172

b°. Libertarian view of moral evil, Ž 119.............. 178

Objections : -- -

ał. It still traces sin to God, & 121 ............... 180

b4. It sequestrates omnipotence, 3122........... 181

co. It aggravates man’s impotence, Ž 123........ 181

do. It conflicts with consciousness, 3123........ 182

PAGE

*. Present approximation of the two schools
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