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or which may be contrary to the laws of the country, to public order or good morals.

ARTICLE 8. Each Government also reserves the right to suspend the international telegraph service for an indefinite period, if deemed necessary by it, either generally, or only over certain lines and for certain classes of correspondence, of which such Government shall imme diately notify all the other Contracting Governments.

ARTICLE 11. Telegrams relating to the international telegraph service of the Contracting States shall be transmitted free of charge over the entire systems of such States.

ARTICLE 12. The High Contracting. Parties shall render accounts to one another of the charges collected by each of them.

ARTICLE 17. The High Contracting Parties reserve respectively the right to enter among themselves into special arrangements of any kind with regard to points of the service which do not interest the States generally,

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Part II.-REGULATIONS GOVERNING SHIP AND LAND

RADIO STATIONS.

SHIP STATIONS.

radio mess

1. On vessels coming under the ship acts, an emer

Emergency ap

paratus. gency, power supply, independent of the vessel's main electric power plant, must be provided which will enable

es to be sent for at least four hours over a distance of at least 100 miles day or night. The emergency power supply and equipment should be located and installed in such manner as to afford maximum protection against accident.

2. The radio transmitting apparatus, operated from the emergency power supply, should be capable of functioning within two minutes after unexpected notice to the operator.

3. The complete equipment must be maintained in an efficient condition at sea.

4. The complete emergency equipment should be tested before each sailing and daily at sea by the operator or an inspector and a note of its performance entered in the radio log.

5. Radio inspectors or other duly authorized officers of the Government will occasionally call for test messages, to be sent by means of the emergency apparatus, while the vessel is at sea.

6. An "induction coil” connected to "plain aerial” is not recommended as emergency apparatus, on account of the high voltages produced which frequently damage the antenna insulation and on account of « vibrator troubles."

7. A motor generator or rotary converter operated by storage battery is probably the most satisfactory means available at present of energizing the transmitting apparatus.

8. Any auxiliary engine for wireless purposes must operate on a fuel which will fulfill the requirements of Rule XI, section 5, of the General Rules and Regulations of the Steamboat-Inspection Service, reading as follows:

None of the inflammable articles specified in section 4472, Revised Statutes, or oil that will not stand a fire test of 300° F. shall be used as stores on any pleasure steamer or steamer carrying passengers except that vessels not carrying passengers for hire may transport gasoline or any of the products of petroleum for use as a source of motive power for motor boats or launches of such vessels. (Sec. 4472, R. S.) 55830°_14

49

avail

Power able.

Communication between

bridge.

Spare parts and 9. Every ship station shall carry a reasonable number repairs.

of spares of such parts of both the main and emergency radiotelegraph equipments as are subject to undue wear, deterioration, or liability to accident.

10. One extra pair of head telephones, extra cords, and extra detectors must always be kept on hand.

11. A storage battery voltmeter, hydrometer, a supply of electrolyte, and distilled water should be a part of the regular equipment, but are not prescribed in terms by statute. The absence of these and similar inexpensive emergency articles will be brought to the attention of the master and of the company installing the apparatus by the radio inspector, in writing, and if after a reasonable interval they have not been supplied, the inspector will communicate the fact to the Commissioner of Navigation.

12. The vessel's electric power for the operation of the main equipment shall, at all times while the steamer is under way, be available for the radio operator's use. On steamers where the dynamo is not run continuously there should be an efficient means of communication between the radio room and the dynamo room, in order that the radio operator may signal for power, as the law provides that he may not leave his post of duty.

13. Efficient communication between the radio room radio room and and the bridge must be maintained. A speaking tube or

telephone will comply with this requirement. A bell and messenger service will not be acceptable unless there are special conditions justifying this equipment. The speaking tube or telephone must terminate in the radio room and on the bridge, or in the chart room if readily accessible from the bridge. If the radio room is adjacent to or accessible from the bridge so that orders may be transferred direct, no means of communication will be required. Any arrangement calling for the services of a third person to transmit the message will not be satisfactory. The radio inspectors will notify the ship authorities whether the means of communication provided is satisfactory at the time of inspection.

14. On vessels of the United States it is the statutory duty of the master to see that one operator is on duty at all times. The radio service of the ship is under the supreme authority of the master.

15. Masters should require operators on duty to communicate with the officer on the bridge every half hour.

16. Operators must make entries on the radio log every 15 minutes, as evidence that a continuous watch is being maintained. The entries must, if possible, consist of the call letters of other stations communicating

and a few words of the intercepted messages. Vessels in port.

17. When vessels are in port the key to the radio room must at all times be on board in charge of the proper officer and the radio equipment shall be in such condition as to facilitate Government inspection.

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Continuous watch.

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CLASSIFICATION OF SHIP STATIONS AND GRADES OF

OPERATORS REQUIRED.

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18. First Class: Vessels having a continuous service. First class. There shall be placed in the first-class vessels which are intended to carry 25 or more passengers-(1) If they have an average speed in service of 15 knots or more; (2) if they have average speed in service of more than 13 knots, but only subject to the twofold condition that they have on board 200 persons or more (passengers and crew), and that, in the course of their voyage, they go a distance of more than 500 sea miles between any two consecutive ports.

19. Second Class: Vessels having a continuous watch Second class.
but a service of limited duration. Other vessels placed
in the second class must, during navigation, maintain a
continuous watch for at least seven hours a day, and a
watch of ten minutes at the beginning of every other hour.

20. Third Class: Vessels which have no fixed periods Third class.
of service. All vessels which are placed neither in the
first nor in the second class shall be placed in the third
class.

21. Service may be defined as preparedness to transmit Service and
and receive radio messages or signals at the rate of at quired.
least 20 words per minute.

22. Watch may be defined as preparedness to receive distress signals and call letters slowly. A "watcher" or cargo-grade operator will summon a first or second class operator if necessary.

23. All American vessels required by the act of July 23, 1912, to be equipped with radio apparatus, and operators must at all hours maintain a continuous watch; that is to say, an operator or watcher must be listening in" continuously. This requirement is outside of and above the requirement based on the classification under which the ship's station is licensed.

24. Vessels voluntarily equipped are not required to maintain this continuous watch. Vessels voluntarily equipped are, however, subject to the following requirements as to watch according to the class assigned to them in their station licenses.

25. If a license of the second class be issued to a voluntarily equipped vessel, the station must maintain a continuous watch for at least seven hours a day and a watch of ten minutes at the beginning of every hour.

26. The grade of operators required on vessels of each class are prescribed in the London Convention Service Regulations, Article X. A continuous watch may be maintained by one commercial second-grade operator and one cargo-grade operator on cargo steamers.

27. Passenger vessels coming under the act of July 23, 1912, which carry or are licensed to carry 25 or more passengers, must be placed in the first class: “(a) If they have an average speed in service of 15 knots or more; (b) if they have an average speed in service of more than 13

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knots, but only subject to the twofold condition that they have on board 200 persons or more (passengers and crew), and that in the course of their voyage they go a distance of more than 500 sea miles between any two consecutive ports.” The service shall be carried on by at least two commercial first-grade operators.

28. Cargo vessels coming under the act of July 23, 1912, which are required to maintain a continuous watch, must be placed in the second class if continuous service is not maintained. On cargo steamers a continuous watch may be maintained by at least one commercial second-grade operator and one cargo-grade operator.

29. Passenger vessels coming under the act of July 23, 1912, but which are not required to be entered in the first class, may be entered in the first or second class, according to whether continuous service or continuous watch is maintained. The number and grade of operators required is determined by service or watch. On passenger vessels coming under the ship act but entered in the second class at least two second-grade operators are required to maintain continuous watchiq h come under the act of July 30. Cargo vessels which con cintain a continuous watch

, 1912, and are required to maintie continuous service is may

be placed in the first class, if any) maintained. (For operators, see par. 28. radio appa

31. All vessels voluntarily equipped with teservice or ratus and which have no specified hours of 9. watch must be placed in the third class.

reed in 32. Any vessel voluntarily equipped may be pla.ce the the first class if continuous service is maintained, or in second class if a continuous watch, or a watch of limit duration, such as specified above for vessels of the secon. class, is maintained.

33. In all ship stations transmissions shall be made only by operators holding commercial first or second grade licenses or higher.

34. Continuous service shall be maintained by not lower than commercial first-grade operators.

35. Vessels which are voluntarily equipped with radio apparatus for their own convenience and for the correspondence of officers and crew must employ at least one commercial second-grade operator or higher.

36. Radio telephone apparatus on vessels not coming under the act of July 23, 1912, must be operated by a person holding a cargo-grade license or higher.

37. The owners of ship stations desiring to change the classification of a ship must apply for a new license.

LAND STATIONS. Coast stations, 38. Coast stations are stations which transmit mes

sages to vessels at sea or on the Great Lakes, or whose operations can interfere with the exchange of messages between ship and ship or ship and coast. The principal purpose of the regulation of radio communication, international and national, is to secure the greatest efficiency

definition of.

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