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408

the Fairy

411

FABLES. PART I.
: Page XXXIV. The Mäftiffs

Page is.

XXXV. The Barley-Mow and the
Introduction. The Shepherd and the Philoso-

Dunghill
pher.
391 XXXVI. Pythagoras and the Countryman

ib.
1. To his Highness William Duke

XXXVII. The Farmer's Wife and the
of Cumberland. The Lion, the

Raven

ib.
Tiger, and the Traveller.
392 XXXVIII. The Turkey and the Ant

407
II. The Spaniel and the Camelion
"ib. XXXIX. The Father and Jupiter,

ib,
Ill. The Mother, the Nurse, and

XL. The Two Monkeys
393 XLI. The Owl and the Farmer

ib.
IV. The Eagle and the Assembly of

XLII. The Jugglers

ib.
Animals
ib. XLII. The Council of Horses

409
V. The Wild Boar and the Ram
394 XLIV. The Hound and the Huntsman

ib.
VI. The Mifer and Plutus
ib. XLV. The Poet and the Rose

410
VII. The Lion, the Fox, and the

XLVI, The Cur, the Horse, and the
Geese
ib. Shepherd's Dog

ib.
Vill. The Lady and the Waly
395 XLVII. The Court of Death

ib.
IX. The Bull and the Mastiff

ib. XLVIII. The Gardener and the Hog
X. The Elephant and the Book-

XLIX. The Man and the Flea

ib,
seller
ib. L. The Hare and mazzy Friends

412
XI. The Peacock, the Turkey, and

PART II.
the Goose
396 1. The Dog and the Fox

ib.
XII. Cupid, Hymen, and Plutus

ib. 11. The Vulture, the Sparrow, and other
XIII. The Tame Stag

397
Birds. To a Friend in the Country

413
XIV. The Monkey who had seen the

III. The Baboon and the Poultry

414
World
ib. IV. The Ant ir Office. To a Friend

415
XV. The Philosopher and the Pheaa

V. The Bear in a Boat. To a Coxcomb

417
fants

398 Vi. The Squire and his Cur
XVI. The Pin and the Needle

ib.

VII. The Countryman and Jupiter. To
XVII. The Shepherd's Dog and the

Myself

419
Wolf

399

VIII. The Man, the Cat, the Dog, and the
XVIII. The Painter who pleased no-

Fly. To my native Country

42.0
hody and every body

ib. IX. The Jackall, Leopard, and other Beasts.
XIX. The Lion and the Cub
ib To a modern Politician

422
XX. The old Hen and the Cock

400

X. The Degenerate Bees. To the Rev.
XXI, The Rat-catcher and Cats

ib. Dr. Swift, Dean of St. Patrick's
XXII. The Goat without a Beard

401

XI. The Pack-horse and the Carrier. To
XXIII. The Old Woman and her Cats

ib.
a young Noblerr.an

ib.
XXIV. The Butterfly and the Snail

405

XII, Pan and Fortune. To a young Heir · 424
XXV. The Scold and the Parrot
'ib. X!IL Plutus, Cupid, and Time

425
XXVI. The Cur and the Mastiff

ib. XIV. The Owl, the Swan, the cock, the
XXVII. The Sick Man and the Angel. 403

Spider, the Als, and the Farmer.
XXVIII. The Persian, the Sun, and the

To a Mother

427
Cloud

ib. XV. The Cook-maid, the Turnspit, and
XXIX. The Fox at the Point of Death

ib. the Ox. To a poor Man
XXX. The Setting Dog and the Par-

XVI. The Raven, the Sexton, and the Earth-

worm, To Laura
tridge
404

429
XXXI. TheUniversal Apparition
ib. Aye and No. A Fáble

431
XXXII. The two Owls and the Sparrow

405
Duke
upon

Duke; an excelent new Ballad ib.
XXXIII. The Courtier and Proteus
'ib. Dione ; a Pastoral Tragedy

433

418

423

428

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Where Virtue deigns to dwell;
If yet the treads on British ground,
Where can the fugitive be found,
In city, court, or cell ?

II.
Not there, where wine and frantic mirth
Unite the sensual fons of earth

In Pleasure's thoughtless train ;
Nor yet where sanctity's a show,
Where souls nor joy nor pity know
For human bliss or pain.

III.
Her social heart alike disowns
The race, who shunning crowds and thrones,

In Tades fequefter'd doze ;
Whose Noth no generous care can wake,
Who rot like weeds on Lethe's lake,
In senseless, vile repose.

IV.
With these she shuns the factious tribe,
Who spum the yet unoffer'd bribe,

And at corruption lour;
Waiting till Discord Havock cries,
In hopes, like Catiline, to rise
On anarchy to pow'r!

v.
Ye Wits, who boast from ancient times;
A right divine to scourge our crimes,

Is it with you the rests ?
No. Int’rest, Nander are your views,
And Virtue now, with every muse,

Flies your unhallow'd breafts.
VOL. VII.

VI.
There was a time, I heard her say,
Ere females were seduc'd by play,

When Beauty was her throne ;
But now, where dwelt the Soft Defires,
The Furies light forbidden fires,
To Love and Her unknown.

VII.
From these th' indignant goddess Alies,
And where the fpires of Science rife,

A while suspends her wing;
But pedant Pride and Rage are there,
And Faction tainting all the air,
And pois’ning every spring.

VIII.
Long through the sky's wide pathless way
The muse observ'd the wand'rer stray,

And mark'd her last retreat ;
O'er Surrey's barren heaths she flew,
Descending like the filent dew
On Ether's peaceful seat.

IX.
There the beholds the gentle Mole
His pensive waters calmly roll,

Amidit Elyfan ground:
There through the windings of the grove
She leads her family of Love,
And strews her sweets around.

X.
I hear her bid the Daughters fair
Oft to yon gloomy grot repair,

Her secret steps to meet;
Nor Thou, she cries, these shades forsake,
But come, lov'd Confort, come and make
The husband's bliss complete.

XI.
Yet not too much the foothing ease
Of rural indolence shall please

My Pelham's ardent breast;
The man whom Virtue calls her own
Must stand the pillar of a throne,

And make a nation bleft.

B

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