Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub

REPUBLICAN.

[ocr errors][merged small]

REPUBLICAN.

DEMOCRATIC, one free and un- tion of their free inrestricted ballot in stitutions, that the all public elections policy of Federal and that such ballot control of elections shall be counted to which the Reand returned as publican party has cast; that such laws committed itself is shall be enacted and fraught with the enforced as will gravest dangers, secure to every citi- scarcely less mozen, be he rich or mentous than would poor, native or result from a revoluforeign born, white tion practically esor black, this tablishing a monarsovereign right chy on the ruins of guaranteed by the the re public. It Constitution. strikes at the North

The free and as well as the South, bonest popular and injures the ballot, the just and colored citizen even equal representation more than the of all the people, as white ; it means a well as their just horde of deputy and equal protection marshals at every under the laws, are polling place, armed the foundation of with Federal power, our republican in- returning boards apstitutions, and the pointed and con, party will never re- trolled by Federal lax its efforts until authority; the outthe integrity of the rage of the electoral ballot and the purity rights of the people of elections shall be in the several States; fully guaranteed the subjugation of and protected in the colored people

to the control of the We denounce the party in power and continued inhuman the reviving of race outrages

perpe antagonisms, now trated apon Ameri- happily abated, of can citizens for poli- the utmost peril to cal reasons in certain the

safety Southern States of happiness of all--a

measure deliberately and justly described by a leading Republican Senator as "the most infamous bill that ever crossed the threshold of the Senate." Such a policy, if sanctioned by law, would mean the dominance of a self-per petuating oligarchy of office holders, and the party first intrusted with its machinery could be dislodged from power only by an appeal to the reserved right of the people to resist op

DEMOCRATIC. pression which is inherent in all selfgoverning communities. Two years ago this revolutionary policy was emphatically condemned by the people at the polls; but, in contempt of that verdict, the Republican party has defiantly declared, in its latest authoritative utterance, that its success in the coming elections will mean the enactment of the .Force bill and the usurpation of despotic control over elections in all the States,

Believing that the preservation of republican govern; ment in the United States is dependent upon the defeat of this policy of legalized force and fraud, we invite the support of all citizens who desire to see the Constitution maintained in its integrity with the laws pursuant thereto which have given our country a hundred years of unexampled prosperity; and we pledge the Democratic party, if it be intrusted with power, not only to the defeat of the Force bill but also to relentless opposition to the Republican policy of profligate expenditure, which in the short space of two years

has

squandered an enormous surplus and emptied an overflowing Treasury, after piling new burdens of taxation upon the already overtaxed labor of the country,

every State.

and

the Union

dalous satire upon being successful:

Civil Service, 1892.

support, but this was denied by what were REPUBLICAN.

DEMOCRATIC. called "the old guard," who favored the We commend the Public office is a recognition

of those only who were plainly spirit and evidence public trust. We

identified with the Third party. of reform in the reaffirm the declara

At 12 o'clock the roll of States for nomiCivil Service and tion of the Demo- nation for President was hardly completed the wise and con- cratic National Con

and there were four candidates before the sistent enforcement vention of 1876 for Convention-Weaver, of Iowa ; Kyle, of by the Republican the reform of the South Dakota ; Field, of Virginia, and party of the laws re- civil service, and we

Page of Virginia. The chance seemed gulating the same. call for the honest favorable to Weaver, but the uncertainty

enforcement of all of a nomination on the first ballot made his laws regulating the friends still painfully anxious. Gresham's same. The nomina- declination had been at last reluctantly action of a President, cepted by his admirers, and the refusal of as in the recent Re- Van Wyck to allow the consideration of his publican Conven

name practically left the field to the four
tion, by delegations candidates who had been formally pre-
composed largely of sented.
his appointees, hold-

The Ballot.
• ing office at his
pleasure, is a scan-

The first ballot for President resulted as

follows, only one ballot necessary, Weaver free popular institutions and a startling , Alabama, Weaver, 43, Arkansas, Weaver illustration of the 12; Kyle, 20; California, Weaver, 25; methods by which a Colorado, Weaver, 6; Kyle, 10; ConnecPresident may

ticut, Weaver, 8; Kyle, 2; Delaware, gratify his ambition. Weaver, 1; Florida, Weaver, 16; Georgia , We denounce a

Weaver, 16; Kyle, 39; Idaho, Weaver, policy under which 12; Illinois, Weaver, 41; Kyle, 42; InFederal

office

diana, Weaver 54; Kyle, 5; Norton, 1; holders usurp con

Iowa, Weaver, 52; Kansas, Weaver, trol of party con: Weaver, 32 ; 'Maine, Weaver

, 6;. Kyle, 40; Kentucky, Weaver, 40; Louisiana, ventions in the States, and

3; Massachusetts, Weaver, 9; Kyle, 18; pledge the Demo- Page, 1; Michigan, Weaver, 56; Minne cratic party to the sota, Weaver, 27; Kyle, 9; Mississippi

, reform of these and Weaver, 17 ; Missouri, Weaver, 6] ; Kyle, all other a buses

7; Montana, Kyle, 12; Nebraska, Weaver, which threaten in- 23; Kyle, 3; Nevada, Kyle, 7; New dividual liberty and Jersey, Weaver, 4; New York, Weaver, local self-govern. North Dakota, Weaver, 11; Kyle, 1;

59; North Carolina, Weaver, 20 ; Kyle, 5; ment.

Ohio, Weaver, 30; Kyle, 22: Oregon,

Weaver, 16; Pennsylvania, Weaver, 29; The Third or Peoplo's Party.

Stanford, 1; South Dakota, Weaver, 1

Kyle, 15; Tennessee, Weaver, 45 ; Texas, The political wing of the Farmers' Al-Weaver, 60; Virginia, Weaver, 48; liance and the elements favoring the enter- Washington, Weaver, 15: West Virginia, ing of the Labor organizations into poli-Weaver, 17; Wisconsin, Weaver, 7; Kyle, tics, united in a National Convention at 41; Wyoming, Weaver, 3; District of Omaha on the 4th of July, 1892. This Columbia, Weaver, 8; Oklahoma, Weaver, Convention was the outcome of several 8. Total: Weaver, 995; Kyle, 265; previous efforts on the part of these several Norton, 1; Page, 15 Stanford, 1. organizations to enter national politics. In Maryland, New Hampshire, Rhode Ismany State Conventions of the Alliance land, South Carolina, Vermont, Alaska, its sub-treasury plan divided the organiza- Arizona, Indian Territory, New Mexico tion into two factions-political and non- and Utah are blank. political, and as a result the representation Norton moved to make the nomination at Omaha did not reflect the views of the unanimous, and Schilling, of Wisconsin, entire organization.

Washburn, of Massachusetts, and the Judge Gresham of Indiana, was promi- delegates from South Dakota, Montana nently named as a Presidential candidate, and Massachusetts seconded the motion. It and he finally consented to the use of his was carried with a hurrah and loud cheer. name if it could command unanimousling.

we

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

General James G. Field, of Virginia, the formation of combines and rings, the and of the Confederate service, was nomi- impoverishment of the producing class. nated on the first ballot for Vice President. We pledge ourselves that, if given power,

we will labor to correct these evils by wise People's Party Platform. and reasonable legislation, in accordance Preamble: Corruption dominates the with the terms of our platform. ballot box, the Legislatures, the Congress The platform proper, declares : and touches even the ermine of the bench. First. -That the union of the labor forces The people are demoralized, most of the of the United States this day consummated States have been compelled to isolate the shall be permanent and perpetual. May voters at the polling places to prevent uni- its spirit into all hearts for the salvation versal intimidation or bribery:* The news- of the Republic aid the uplifting of manpapers are largely subsidized or muzzled, kind. public opinion silenced, business pros Second. -Wealth belongs to him who trated, our homes covered with mortgages, creates it, and every dollar taken from inlabor impoverished and the land concen-dustry without an equivalent is robbery. trating in the hands of the capitalists. "If any will not work, neither shall he

The urban workmen are denied the right eat. The interests of rural and civic of organization for self-protection ; impor-labor are the same: their enemies are ted pauperized labor beats down their identical, wages; a hireling standing army, unrec Third. We believe that the time has ognized by our laws, is established to shoot come when the railroad corporations will them down, and they are rapidly degenera- either own the people or the people must ting into Europern conditions. The fruits own the railroads, and should the governof the toil of nillions are boldly stolen to ment enter upon the work of owning and build up colossal fortunes for a few, unpre- managing all railroads, we should favor an cedented in the history of mankind, and amendment to the Constitution by which the possessors of these in turn despise the all persons engaged in the government serrepublic and endanger liberty. From the vice shall be placed under a Civil Service same prolific womb of govermental injustice regulation of the most rigid character, so we breed the two great classes-tramps as to prevent the increase of the power of and millionares.

the national administration by the use of The national power to create money is such additional government employés. appropriated to enrich bond-holders; a Finance.-We demand a national curPast public debt payable in legal tender rency, safe, sound and flexible, issued by currency has been funded into gold-bearing the general government only, a full legal bonds, thereby adding millions to the bur-tender for all debts, public and private,

and that without the use of banking corSilver, which has been accepted as coin porations, a just, equitable and efhcient since the dawn of history, has been de- means of distribution direct to the people, monetized to add to the purchasing power at a tax rate not to exceed two per cent. of gold by decreasing the value of all per annum to be provided as set forth in forms of property as well as human labor, the sub-Treasury plan of the Farmers' and the supply of currency is purposely Alliance or a better system : also by pay. abridged to fatten usurers and bankrupt ments in discharge of its obligations for enterprise and slave industry.

public improvements. We declare that this republic can only* (a).-We demand free and unlimited endure as a free government while built coinage of silver and gold at the present upon the love of the whole people for each legal ratio of 16 to 1. other and for the nation; that it cannot be (b).-We demand that the amount of pinned together by bayonets; that the circulating medium be speedily increased civil war is over, and that every passion to not less than $50 per capita. and resentment which grew out of it must (c).-We demand a graduated income die with it, and that we must be, in fact, tax. as we are in name, one united brotherhood (d). -We believe that the money of the

country should be kept as much as possiOur country finds itself confronted by ble in the hands of the people, and hence conditions for which there is no precedent we demand that all

. State and national in the history of the world. Our annual revenues shall be limited to the necessary agricultural productions amount to billions expenses of the government, economically of dollars in value, which must within a and honestly administered. few weeks or months be exchanged for. (e). -We demand that postal savings billions of dollars of commodities consumed banks be established by the government for in their production. The existing currency the safe deposit of the earnings of the peosupply is wholly inadequate to make this ple and to facilitate exchange. exchange. The results are falling prices, Transportation. - Transportation being a

dens of the people.

of free men.

means of exchange and a public necessity, natural sources of wealth, is the heritage the government should own and operate of the people and should not be monopothe railroads in the interests of the people. lized for speculative purposes, and alien

(a).-The telegraph, telephone, like the ownership of land should be prohibited. post-office system, being a necessity for the All land now held by railroads and other transmission of news, should be owned and corporations in excess of their actual needs, operated by the government in the inter- and all lands now owned by aliens, should est of the people,

be reclaimed by the government and held Land. - The land, including all the for actual settlers only.

AMERICAN POLITICS.

BOOK III.

GREAT SPEECHES ON GREAT ISSUES.

« ПредишнаНапред »