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Here files of pins extend their fhining rows, ri
Puffs, powders, patches, bibles, billet-doux.
Now awful beauty puts on all its arms,
The fair each moment rises in her charms,
Repairs her (miles, awakens every grace,
And calls forth all the wonders of her face ;
Sees by degrees a purer blush arise,
And keener lightnings quicken in her eyes.'
The busy Sylphs surround her darling care ;
These fet the head, and those divide the hair.
Some fold the Neeve, while others plait the gown,'
And Betty's prais d for labours not her own.

Palvis fuavis odote, & epiftola fuavis amore. 11, T
Induit arma ergo, Veneris pulcherrima virgo;
Pulchrior in przfens tempus de tempore crescens
Jam reparat tifus,lijata surgit gtatia visûsya, a
Jam promit cultu, miracla latentia redtu.
Pigmina jam' miscety quo plus fua putpura gliseety
Et geminans bellis fpletidet magnè fulgor ocellis. I
Stant Lemures mutinympha intentique falutis
Hic figit zonam capiti locatible coronam; trA
Hæc manicis formam, plicís datu& altera normamas;
Et tibi vel Betty, tibi vel nitidiffima Letty 1:9
Gloria factorum temerè concedinir hocam. Odw

9:09?7yver at Nordin

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HEALTH. AN ECLOGUE. Let Sloth lye foftning till high noon

in down, Or lolling fan her in the fultry down,

Unnerv'd with reft; and turn her own disease, NOW early shepherds o'er the meadows pals, Or foster others in luxurious cafe: And print long foot-steps in

the glittering grafs ; I mount the courser, call the deep-mouth'd houden The cows neglectful of their pasture stand, The fox unkennel'd Aies to covert grounds ; By turns obsequious to the milker's hand.

I lead where stags thro' tangled thickets tread, When Damon softly trod the shaven lawn, And shake the saplings with their branching head; Damon a youth from city cares withdrawn ; I make the falcons wing their airy way, Long was the pleasing walk be wander'd thro', And foar to feize, or ftooping Atrike their prey A cover'd arbour clos'd the distant view ;

To snare the fish I fix the luring bait ; There rests the youth, and while the feathers To wound the fowl I load the gun with fate. throng

Tis thus thro' change of exercise I range, Raise their wild music, thus contrives a long. And strength and pleasure rise from every change. Here wafted o'er by mild Etefian air,

Here beauteous Health for all the year remain, Thou country Goddess, beauteous Health! repair; When the next comes, I'd charm chee chus again. Here let my breaft, thro' quir'ring trees, inhale Oh come, thou Goddess of my rural song, Thy rosy blessings with the morning gale.

And bring thy daughter, calm Content, along, What are the fields, or flow'rs, or all I see? Dame of the ruddy cheek and laughing cyc, Ah! taiteless all, if not enjoy'd with thee. From whose bright presence clouds of sorrow

Joy to my soul! I feel the Goddess nigh, The face of nature cheers as well as I;

For her I mow my walks, I plat my bowers; O'er the flat green refreshing breezes run,

Clip my low hedges, and support my flowers; The smiling daisies blow bencath the sun,

To welcome her, this summer seat I drest, The brooks run purling down with filver waves, And here I court her when she comes to reft ; The planted lanes rejoice with dancing leaves, When the from exercise to learned ease The chirping birds from all the compass rove, Shall change again, and teach the change to To tempt the tuneful echoes of the grove!

please. High sunny summits, deeply shaded dales,

Now friends conversing my soft hours refine, Thick mofly banks, and flow'ry winding vales, And Tully's Tusculum revives in mine : With various prospects gratify the fight,

Now to grave books I bid the mind retreat, And scatter fix'd attention in delight.

And such as make me rather good than great. Come, country Goddess, come, nor thou suffice, Or o'er the works of easy Fancy rove, But bring thy mountain-sister, Exercise.

Where flutes and innocence amuse the grove: Call’d by thy lovely voice, she turns her pace, The native bard that on Sicilian plains Her winding horn proclaims the finish'd chace ; Firtt sung the lowly manners of the swains; She mounts the rocks, the skims the level plain, Or Maro's muse that in the faireft light Dogs, hawks, and horses, crowd her early train ; Paints rural prospects and the charms of figbt; Her hardy face repels the tanning wind,

These soft amusements bring content along, And lines and meihes loosely float behind.

And fancy, void of sorrow, turns to Song, All these as means of toil the feeble see,

Here beauteous Health for all the year remain, But these are helps to pleasure join'd with thee. When the next comes, I'll charm the thus

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Some roimh the 70 feat within the pit,'» "!
I waited foft with Zephyretta few zabud

THE FLIES. AN E C L OG U, E. Ye foulish nurlings of the summer air,

orphia Thefe gentle tunes and whining songs forbear; WHEN in the river cows for cooleefs stand, , Your trees and whisp’ring breeze, your grove and And sheep for breezes seek the lofty land, .. }

love', A youth, whom Arop taught that ev'ry trees I Your Cupid's quiver, and his mother's dove, Lach bird, and infea ipoke as well as hos i Let bards to business bend their vig'rous wing, Walk'd calmly muling in a haded way,crti'. 11 And fing but feldom, if they love to ling: Where Alow'ring hawthorn broke the funny ray, Else, when che flow'rets of the season fail, And thus inftruets his mosal pen to draw got it And this your feriiy thade forsakes the vale, A scene that obvious in the field he faw. will Tho'one would saya yeni net'one grain of wheat,

Near á tow diech, where shallow waters meet, Should pay such longiters Idling at my gate. Which never learn’d to glide with liquid feet, He ceaside the Flies, iøcorrigibly vain, Whole Naiads never prattle as they play,

Heard the Mayor's speech, and fell to fing again.
But screen'd with hedges Number out the day ;
There stands a Nender fern's aspiring fade,
Whore answ'ring branches regularly laid
Put forth their answ'ring boughs, and proudly rise
Three stories upward, in the nether skies.
For shelter here, to thun the noon-day heat,

Α Ν
An airy nation of the Flies retreat ;
Some in soft air their filken pinions ply,

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And forme ftoff bough to bough delighted Ay,

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Some rise, and circling light to perch again ; '.
A pleafing murmur hums along the plain.

TO AN OLD BE A U T Y.
So, a itage invites to pageant
In boxes fome with spruce pretenfion fit,

You Neep in cream and frontlets all the night, Some

Your face with patches foil, with paint repair, or to roam wil Press with gay gowns, and shade with foreign hair. Preluding myfit Alls the Tofty dorrte. 007 09: Et

, When thus a ply fir wikt Fly can faymtu Why reálly fifty-five is something old. Deserves attention) raited the rural lay. i staart 2 Once you were young; or one, whose life's fo long

Where late Amyntoritate a nymph a brides she might have born my mother, tells me wrong. Joyful I flew by young Fivunia's ride, ort, And once (since envy's dead before you die), Who, minder of the feasting, wente to lip" "I The women own, you play'd a sparkling eye, The balmy pleasure of the shepherd's lip. 106€ 17.H Taught the light foot a modith little trip, I fawlie Wanton, where I toop'a to fupi 136 911 And pouted with the prettiest parple lip And halt refolvid to Brown me in the cup

To fome new charmer are the roses fled, ”Till brush'a by carelèfs'lands, the foar'd abover by which blew, to damask all thy cheek with red; Cease, beauty, ceare'to vex'a tender love.ru Youth calls the graces there to fix their reign, Thas ends the youth, the butzing meadow rung, And airs by thousands fill their easy train. And thus the rival of his music sung.

So parting summer bids her flow'ry prime When fins by thousands Mone on orbs of dew, Attend the fun to dress some foreign clime;

While withering seasons in succeflion, here, Saw the clean pail, and fought the milky chear, wo Strip the gay gardens, and deform the year. While litile Daphne reiz'd my roving dear.

But thou (lince nature bids) the world resign, Wretch that I was! I'might have warn'd the damne, Tis now thy daughter's daughter's time to fine. Yet fat indulging as the danger cames 950 time With more address, (or such as pleases more) But the king huntress left her free to foar's She runs her female exercises o'er, Ah! guard ye lovers, guardia mingere more." Unfurls or closes, raps or turns the fan,

Thus from the Fern, whole high projecting arms, And (miles, or blushes at the creature man. The fleeting nation bent with dusky fwarms, we With quicker life, as gilded coaches pass, The swains their love'ia eary mufié breathes 11"10 In fideling courtesy the drops the glass. When tongues and tumults skin the fields beneath.

With better strength, on vist-days the bears Black anto in teams come a nl ning all the road To mount her fifty flights of ample stairs. Some call to márch, and fome to hit the load; Her mien, her hape, her temper, cyes and tongue, They itrainnithey lubdur with incessant painisa Are sure to conquer,-for the rogue is young ; Press’d by the cuthbruits weight of lingle grains. And all that's madly wild, or oddly gay, The Flies truck filent gaze with Wonder down !!! We call it only pretty Fanny's way. The busy burghers reach their carthy town;

Let time that makes you homely, make you Where lay the burtlens of a wint'rý store, vtit And thence'unweary'd part in search of more The sphere of wisdom is the sphere of age. Yolune grave fage a moment's fpace attends, "Tis true, when beauty dawns with early fire, And the small cities loftieft point ascends,

And hears the flatt'ring tongues of soft defire, Wipes the small dew that trickles down his face, If not from virtue, from its bravest ways, And thus harangues them with the graveft grace. The Coul with pleasing avocation strays.

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rige,

But beauty gone, 'tis easier to be wise;

His rofes nipt in ev'ry page, As harpers better, by the lots of cyes.

My poor Anscron mouros thy rage. Henceforth retire, reduce your roving airs, By thee my Ovid wounded lies; Hauntless the plays, and more the public prayers, By thee my Lesbia's iparrow dies : Reject the viechlin nead, and gold brocad, Thy rabid teeth have half deftrey'd Go pray, in rober Norwich crape array d.

The work of love in Biddy Floyd,
Thy pendant diamonds let thy Funny take,

They rent Belinda’, locks away,
(Their trembling lustre thew: how much you thake;) | And (poil'd the Blouzelind of Gag.
Or bid her wear thy necklace rowd with pearl, For all, for ev'ry fingle deed,
You'll find your Fanny an obedient girl.

Relentless justice bids thee bleed.
So for the rest, with less.cncumbrance hung,

Then fall a victim to the Nine, You waik thro' lie, unmingled with the young ; Myself the Priest, my desk the Shrine. And view the thide and substance as you pass,

Bring Homer, Virgil, Talloneas, With joint endeavour criting at the glass,

To pile a sacred altar bere; Or foily dreft, and rambling all her days,

Hold, boy, thy hand out-runs thy wit, To me t her counterpart, a d grow by praise: You reach'd the plays that D -writ; Yet still ledare yourleli, and gravely plain,

You reach'd me Phs rustic Atrain;. You neither fret, nor envy at the voin..

Pray take your inortal bords again. 'Twas thus (if man with woman we compare) Come bind the victim,here he lies, The wife Athenian crofs'd a zlitt'ring fair,

And here between his num'rous eyes Unmov'd by tongues anú fighis, he walk'd the This venerable duft I lay, place,

From manuscripts just swept away. Thro'tape, toys, tinsel, gimp, perfume, and lace; The goblet in my hand I take, Then binds fiom Mars's hill his awful eyes, (For the libation's yet to make) And “ What a world I never want '" he cries; A health to poets ! all their days But cries unheard: for foily will be free.

May they have bread, as well as praise ; So part che buzzing gaudy crowd, and he:

Sense may they feek, and less engage As coreless he for them, as they for him ;

in papers filld with party-tage.. He wrapt in Wisdom, and they whirl,d by Whim. But if their riches spoil their vein,

Ye Muses, make them poor again.

Now bring the weapon, yander blade,
With which my tuneful pens are made.
I strike the scale that arms chce round,

And twice and thrice I print the wound;
THE BOOK-W OR M.

The sacred altar fioats with red,

And now he dies, and now he's dead. COME liither, boy, we'll hunt to-day

How like the fon of Jove I ftand, The Book-worm, rav’ning heart of prey, This Hydra stretch'd beneath my hand ! Produc'd by parent Enth, at odds

Lay bare the monster's entrails here, ( 4s fame reports i:) w ch the Gods.

To see what dangers threat the year: Hiro tanic hunger wildly drives

Ye gods! what sonnets on a wench? Against a thouiand authors lives :

What lean translations from the French? Thro'all the fields of wit he fies;

'Tis plain, this lobe is so unsound, Dreadful his head with cluít'ring eyes,

Sprints, before the months go round. With horns withou:, ard tulks within,

But hold, before I close the scene, And scales to serve him for a kin.

The sacred altar should be clean. Obierve him rearly, leit he climb

Oh had I Sh -ll's second bays, To wound the bards of antient time,

Or T-! thy pert and humble lays! Or down the vale of fancy go

(Ye fair, forgive me, when I vow To tear some modern wretch below:

I never miss’d your works till now) On ev'ry corner fix thine eye,

I'd tear the leaves to wipe the shrine, On ten to one he Nips thee by.

(That only way you please the Nine) Sce where his teeth a pariage cât:

But since I chance to want these two, We'll rouse him from the deep retreat.

I'll make the songs of Daydo. But who the shelter's forc'd to give,

Rent from the corps, on yonder pin, 'Tis sacred Virgil as I live!

I hang the icales that brac'd it in; From leaf to leaf, from long to forg,

I hang my studious morning gown, He draws the tadpole form along,

And write my own inscription down. He mounts the gilded edge before,

“ This trophy from the Python won, He's up, he scuds the cover o'er,

" This robe, in which the deed was done, He turns, he doubles, there he past,

« These, Pardel, glorying in the feat, And here we have him, caught at last.

« Hung on these shelves, the Mures feat: *Insatiate brute, whore teein abure

" Here Ignorance and Hunger found The sweetest servants of the Musc.

16. Large realms of wit to ravage round; (Nay never offer to deny,

“ Here ignorance and Hunger fell; I took thee in the fact to fly.)

“ Two foes in one I sent to hell,

“ Ye poets, who my labours fee, • Come share the triumph all with me! "* Ye Critics ! born to vex the Muse, " Go mourn the grand ally you lose.

AN ALLEGORY ON MAN.

A THOUGHTFUL being, long and spare,

Ourrace of mortals call him Care:
(Were Homer living, well he knew
What name the Gods have call'd him too)
With fine mechanic genius wrought,
And lov'd to work, tho' no one bought.

This being by a model bred
In Jove's eternal Cable head,
Contriv'd a shape impower'd to breathe,
And be the worldling here bencath.

The Man rose staring, like a stake i
Wondering to see himself awake!
Then look'd so wise, before he knew
The business he was made to do ;
That pleas’d to see with what a grace
He gravely shew'd his forward face,
Jove talk'd of breeding him on high,
An under-something of the sky.

But e'er he gave the mighty node
Which ever binds a poet's God:
(for which his curls ambrosial lake,
And mother Earth's oblig'd to quake:
He saw old mother Earth arise,
She stood confess'd before his eyes ;
But not with what we read the wore,
A castle for a crown before,
Nor with long streets and longer roads
Dangling behind her, like commodes :
As yet with wreaths alone {he drest,
And trail'd a landscape-painted vest.
Then thrice the rais'd, (as Ovið faid)
And thrice the bow'd, her weighty head.

Her honours made, great love, the cry'd,
This thing was fa hion's from my side;
His hands, his heart, his head are mine ;
Then what hast thou to call him thine ?

Nay rather afk, the monarch faid,
What boots his hand, his heart, his head,
Were what I gave remov'd away y?
Thy part's an idle shape of clay.

Halves, more than halves! cry'd honest Care,
Your pleas wou'! mike your titles fair,
You clain the body, you the foul,
But I who joind them, claim the whole.

Thus with the gods debate begin,
On such a trivial cause, as man.
And can celestial tempers rag:
(Quoth Virgil in a latter age.)

As thus they wrangled, Time came by ;
(There's none that paint him such as d,
For what the fabling Ancients fung
Makes Saturn old, when Time was young.)
As yet his winters had not shed
Their Silver honours on his head;

VOL. V.

He just had got his pinions free
From his old fire Eternity.
A ferpent girdled round he wore,
The tail within the mouth before.
By whichour almanacks are clear
That learned Egypt meant the year.
A ftaff he carry'd, where on high
A glass was fix'd to measure by,
As amber boxes made a show
For heads of canes an age ago.
His vert, for day, and night, was py';
A berding fickle arm’d his fide;
And (pring's new months his train adorn;
The other seasons were unborn.

Known by the Gods, as near he draws,
They make him umpire of the cause.
O'er a low trunk his arm he laid,
(Where since his Hours adial made ;)
Then leaning heard the nice debate,
And thus pronounc'd the words of Fate.

Since body from the parent earth, And soul from Jove receiv'd a birth, Return they where they first begun; But once their union makes the man, ”Till Jove and Earth shall part these two, 'To Care who join'd them, Man is due.

He said, and sprung with swift carcer To tr..ce a circle for the year ; Where ever fiace the Scasons wheel, And tread on one another's heel.

'Tis well, said Jove, and for consent Thund'ring he shook the firmament. Our umpire Time shall have his way,, With Care I let the creature stay: Let business vex him, av'rice blind, Let doubt and knowledge rack his mind, Let error act, opinion speak, And want afflict, and sickness break, And anger burn, dejection chill, And joy distract, and sorrow kill, "Till arm'd by Care, and taught to mow, Time draws the long destructive blow; And wasted min, whore quick decay Comes hurrying on before the day, Shall only find, by this decree, The foul Aies sooner back to me.

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in age I search, and only find

The grounds which on the right aspire, A poor unfruitful gain,

In dimness from the view retire: Grave wisdom Atalking now behind,

The left presents a place of graves, Oppress'd with loads of pain.

Whose wall the filent water laves. My ignorance cou'd once beguile,

That steeple guides thy doubtful figiat And fancy'd joys inspire ;

Among the livid gleams of night, My crrors cherish'd hope to smile

There pass with melancholy state, On newly-born delire.

By all the folemn heaps of fate, But now experience shews, the bliss

And think, as softly-fad you tread For which I fondly sought,

Above the venerable dead, Not worth the long impatient wish,

“ Time was, like thee they life poffeft, And ardour of the thought.

6 And time shall be, that thou shalt reft." My youth met Fortune fair array’d,

Those graves, with bending ofiers bourd, (In all her pomp the shone)

That nameless heave the crumbled ground, And might, perhaps, have well essay'd

Quick to the glancing thought disciole To make her gift my own :

Where toil and poverty repose. But when I saw the blellings show'r

The flat smooth stones that bear a name, On some unworthy mind,

The chiftels Gender help to fame, I left the chace, and own'd the pow's

(Which e'er our set of friends decay Was justly painted blind.

Their frequent fteps may wear away.) I pass’d the glories which adorn

A middle race of mortals own, Thc splendid courts of kings,

Men, haif ambitious, all unknown. And while the persons mov'd my scorng

The marble tombs that rise on high, I rose to scorn the things.

Whore dead in vaulted arches lye, My manhood felt a vig'rous fire

Whose pillars (well with sculptur'd stones, By love increas'd the more ;

Arms, angels, epitaphs, and bones, But years with coming years conspire

These (all the poor remains of state) To break the chains I wore.

Adorn the rich, or praise the great ; In weakness fafe, the fex I see

Who live on earth in fame they live, With idle lustre thine ;

Are senseless of the fame they give. For what are all their joys to me,

Ha ! while I gaze, pale Cynthia fades, Which cannot now be mine?

The bursting earth unveils the shades! But hold I feel my gout decrease,

All Now, and wan, and wrap'd with farouds, My troubles laid to reft,

They rise in visionary crouds, And truths which would difturb my peace,

And all with sober accent cry, Are painful truths at beit.

“ Think, mortal, what it is to dye." Vainly the time I have to roll

Now from yon black and fun'ral yew, In fad reflection flies ;

That bathes the charnel house with deve, Ye fondling passions of my foul !

Methinks I hear a voice begin ; Ye Tweet deceits ! arise.

(Ye ravens, cease your croaking din, I wisely change the scene within,

Ye tolling clocks, no time resound To things that us'd to please ;

O'er the long lake and midnight ground) In pain, philosophy is spleen,

It sends a peal of hollow groans, In hcalch, 'tis only ease.

Thus speaking from among the bones.

When men my scythe and darts fupply, How great a king of fears am I !

They view me like the last of things :

They make, and then they dread, my fiaga A NIGHT-PIECE ON DEATH,

Fools! if you less provok'd your fears,
No more my spectre-form appears.

Death's but a path that must be trod,
BY the blue taper's trembling light,
No more I waste the wakeful nights

If man wou'd ever passto God:
Intent with endless view to pore

A port of calms, a state of eafe The schoolmen and the fages o'er :

From the rough rage of swelling seas. Their books from wisdom widely straya

Why then why flowing fable stoles, Or point at best the longest way.

Deep pendent cypress, mourning poles, I'll seek a readier path, and go

Loose scarfs to fall athwart thy weeds, Where wildoma's furely taught below.

Long palis, drawn herses, cover'd steeds, How deep yon azure dies the sky!

And plumes of black, that as they tread, Where orbs of gold unnumber'd lye,

Nod o'er the scutcheons of the dead : While thro' their ranks in silver pride

Nor can the parted body know, The nether crescent seems to glide.

Nor wants the soul, these forms of woe : The Numb'ring breeze forgets to breathe,

As men who long in prison dwell, The lake is fmooth and clear beneath,

With lamps that glimmer round the cell, Where once again the Ipang de Inow

When e'er their suffering years are run, Descends to meet our eyes below,

Spring forth to greet the glit'ring lua:

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