A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy

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The Floating Press, 1.06.2010 г. - 221 страници
Sterne travelled through France and Italy three years prior to writing A Sentimental Journey, which he completed on his death bed. The protagonist is a thinly-disguised Sterne who recounts his - mostly amorous - adventures through the two countries. Sterne very particularly wanted the account to be subjective; he discusses opinions and morals and personal experiences in opposition to the drier travelling accounts which dealt with history and classical learning. His book helped to establish travel writing as the dominant genre of the late 18th century.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Потребителски отзив  - Marse - LibraryThing

A Sentimental Journey is the story of a man traveling from England to France and back and his adventures, or should I say, his encounters during the trip. We don't get a lot of "travel" descriptions ... Прочетете пълната рецензия

LibraryThing Review

Потребителски отзив  - stillatim - LibraryThing

Another great example of why you need to really think about what a book's trying to do before you judge it. This is nice and subtle- on the one hand, it tugs the heart-strings unashamedly; on the ... Прочетете пълната рецензия

Съдържание

The Fille de Chambre Paris
116
The Passport Paris
121
The Passport The Hotel at Paris
124
The Captive Paris
129
The Starling Road to Versailles
132
The Address Versailles
135
Le Patissier Versailles
138
The Sword Rennes
142

The Snuff Box Calais
37
The Remise Door Calais
40
In the Street Calais
43
The Remise Calais
46
In the Street Calais
53
Montreuil
57
A Fragment
66
Montreuil
68
The Bidet
72
Nampont The Dead Ass
75
Nampont The Postilion
78
Amiens
80
The Letter Amiens
83
The Letter
88
Paris
90
The Wig Paris
92
The Pulse Paris
95
The Husband Paris
99
The Gloves Paris
102
The Translation Paris
104
The Dwarf Paris
108
The Rose Paris
113
The Passport Versailles
145
Character Versailles
156
The Temptation Paris
160
The Conquest
164
The Mystery Paris
166
The Case of Conscience Paris
169
The Riddle Paris
172
Le Dimanche Paris
174
The Fragment Paris
178
The Fragment and the Bouquet Paris
185
The Act of Charity Paris
187
The Riddle Explained Paris
191
Paris
192
Maria Moulines
197
Maria
201
Maria Moulines
204
The Bourbonnnois
205
The Supper
207
The Grace
210
The Case of Delicacy
212
Endnotes
220
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Информация за автора (2010)

If Fielding showed that the novel (like the traditional epic or drama) could make the chaos of life coherent in art, Sterne only a few years later in The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman (1760--67) laughed away the notion of order. In Sterne's world, people are sealed off in their own minds so that only in unpredictable moments of spontaneous feeling are they aware of another human being. Reviewers attacked the obscenity of Tristram's imagined autobiography as it was published (two volumes each in 1759, early 1761, late 1761, 1765, and one in 1767), particularly when the author revealed himself as a clergyman, but the presses teemed with imitations of this great literary hit of the 1760s. Through the mind of the eccentric hero, Sterne subverted accepted ideas on conception, birth, childhood, education, and the contemplation of maturity and death, so that Tristram's concerns touched his contemporaries and are still important. Since Tristram Shandy is patently a great and lasting comic work that yet seems, as E. M. Forster said, "ruled by the Great God Muddle," much recent criticism has centered on the question of its unity or lack of it; and its manipulation of time and of mental processes has been considered particularly relevant to the problems of fiction in our day. Sterne's Sentimental Journey (1768) has been immensely admired by some critics for its superb tonal balance of irony and sentiment. His Sermons of Mr. Yorick (1760) catches the spirit of its time by dramatically preaching benevolence and sympathy as superior to doctrine. Whether as Tristram or as Yorick, Sterne is probably the most memorably personal voice in eighteenth-century fiction.

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