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Upon my honour I know nothing of it." “Liar!” cried Stanley, “that base look betrays you. Have you got it about

you

? Is it here ?" “I will not be thus treated !” cried the colonel ; but scarcely had he uttered the words when Stanley threw him upon his back, and drew a watch from his pocket. It was not the watch in question, nor had he any other; and as Stanley began to feel that he might have gone a little too far, he relinquished his hold.

“ Vy, vort's o'clock now ?" cried the stumpy proprietor, who entered the room at this moment. “ Vort in the name o' God and Mighty his it ?"

“Will you send for a policeman ? Last night this scoundrel robbed me of my

watch, and I'm now resolved to make him give it up." “Give it hup!--has a matter off course. Kam, none o' yer warment maneuvres-shell out!"

Upon my word I have not got it. I have not, indeed." “No, I dares to say not; ner yer don know vere it his ?”

“For your own reputation, Sharp, make him restore it at once," said Stanley's friend. “He is a servant of yours, and you are therefore to some extent involved."

“Do me the favour to go for a policeman,” said Stanley to his friend, " or watch the villain narrowly while I run myself.”

“ Don't, for God and Mighty's sake, bring the polis hin 'ear! They cusses the 'spectability of hevery 'stablishment they henters. I'il bundle 'im hout neck and crop, and then yea cun give 'im hin charge. But hare yer a-goin' for to give the ticker hup ?—Kam, that's hall about it."

“ I tell you again that I have not got the watch,” replied the colonel; and he winked at the proprietor, conceiving that that might have a favourable effect. But in this he was mistaken; for although Sharp was quite as great a villain as himself, the subject of his own reputation had been touched, and that induced him to be for once in his life honest.

“Oh ho! I twig !” said he, the moment the wink had been given. But

no, it von't fit; no, nothink off the sort; I von't ’ave it." This the colonel conceived to be extremely irregular, “honour among thieves” having been for years the recognised motto of both. He, notwithstanding, drew him aside, and said something in a whisper, as he pulled from his pocket a dirty piece of card about an inch and a half square.

“Now, serpose,” said Sharp, as he returned with this card in his hand," serpose thish 'ear votch is guv hup, vill yer pledge yer verd yer'll perceed no furder ?"

“I will,” replied Stanley.

“ Vell, then, s'pose ag'in that it's pawned for ten pounds, vood yer hin sich a case, yer know, be satisfied vith the dubblikit ?"

Stanley would have been, but his friend interposed. "By no means," said he, “ if that wretch has ten pounds in his pocket.”

“’Ave yer got ten pound ?" inquired Sharp.
“I have not,” replied the colonel.
“He had more than twenty pounds' worth of counters.”

“That's hall werry possible ; but for them, yer know, he guv' in a cheque." “Well

, give me the duplicate,” said Stanley. “This is correct, of course ?

“Oh, that's all reg'lar,” replied Sharp. “You ’ave nothink to do but to show it."

“Now,” said Stanley, addressing the colonel, “ in future keep out of my path. You will never again let me catch you within the reach of my foot if

you are wise." “An' 'e may think hisself lucky,” said the virtuous proprietor, as Stanley's friend left the room ; “ there ain't many as vood ’ave let 'im off so heasy. At hall ewents, he don't darken my doors ag'in. I 'ope as this 'ear von't perwent yer from honourin' me vith another hurly wisit? Good night to yer, gen’elmen—I vish yer good night.”

They now left the house, and Stanley was about to express his thanks warmly ; but his friend, whom he subsequently found to be a member of the House of Commons, would not hear a word. You will find me in the Albany,” said he, “I shall be happy to see you. You must promise to call."

The promise was given, and they parted. It was then two o'clock. Stanley therefore at once proceeded home, where Amelia was happy in the conviction that he had been dining at Richmond, and had thereby effected a reconciliation.

BENTLEY'S

MISCELLANY.

MAY, 1840.

Contents.

Page

GUY FAWKES : AN HISTORICAL ROMANCE, ILLUSTRATED BY GEORGE
CRUIKSHANK,

BY W. HARRISON AINSWORTH

441

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Book the First.
Chapter X-The fate of the Pursuivant.

Chapter XI.-The Pilgrimage to Saini Winifred's Wel.
JOURNAL OF OLD BARNES, THE PANTALOON, ON A TRIP TO PARIS,
IN 1830, WITH TWO ILLUSTRATIONS,

457 A LEGEND OF THE AMERICAN WAR,

BY A. R. W. 469 THE MORAL ECONOMY OF LARGE TOWNS JUVENILE DELINQUENCY,

BY DR. W. C. TAYLOR 470 CHARADE,

BY MISS A. FARRER 478 CHINA. THE REAL STATE OF

THE CASE, FREELY TRANSLATED
FROM THE ORIGINAL CHINESE. ILLUSTRATED BY ALFRED
CROWQUILL, WITH FOUR REAL CHINA PLATES

479 VISIT TO A SIBERIAN FAIR. THE TSHUKTSHI FAIR AT OSTROVNOIE,

BY A RUSSIAN TRAVELLER 484 JACK FROST

496 THE DEATH-BED CONFESSION, FROM THE POSTHUMOUS PAPERS OF A LATE SURGEON

497 JUDGING BY APPEARANCES. - MISTAKES IN A DRAWING-ROOM

508 EARLY FRIENDSHIP ; OR, THE SLAVE OF PASSION

513 STANLEY THORN,

BY THE AUTHOR OF VALENTINE vox” 526 Chapter XII.-In which Stanley performs a gallant action, and the widow is emitten

again.
Chapter XIII.— Treats of the Park, and of Stanley's mysterious interview with Madame

Poupetier.
Chapter XIV.-Explains the characteristics of a peculiar Fancy Dress Ball, at which

Stanley receives a highly interesting communication.
CAPTAIN MORRIS :
A REVIEW,

541

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BENTLEY'S NOTICE.

The illustration for “Stanley Thorn" not being completed by the artist in time for the present month, the next number will contain two illustrations.

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