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Missionary Society. Their collection is purely voluntary. No pastor takes it up, no member is bound by vow or law to contribute to it. The claim is not more sacred, nor the work more important, than that of those organized by the General Conference. Only about a fifth part of the charges have their work organized, but its method is a good one for the purpose, and so it has outrun every benevolence of the Church in the race for success.

There are reported to the credit of this society 4,158 collections, of which 1,588 are not over $2, and are probably the gift of one or two persons; or they come by the pastor's including this with those among which he divides what he has to fill his blanks, as can be seen by the uniformity of the sums running across the list, leaving 2,570 collections, or 25 per cent. of the whole number of charges. Yet there are found 1,045 collections that are multiples of all the six (Church Extension, Tract, Sunday-School, Freedmen's Aid, Education, and Bible) collections on the same charges added together. And after these come 561 collections of sums nearly as large as the sum of these six added together on the same charges.

Now, if the claim of .the collection or the obligation of the giver should be measured by the character and necessities of the work, then the amount raised for these six collections should be to the amount raised for Woman's Foreign Missions as about four to one; just as the amount raised for the parent Missionary Society should be to that for Woman's Foreign Missions as about eight to one, and all the benevolences organized by the General Cenference as twelve to one of this.

The 1,045 charges mentioned above gave altogether for Woman's Foreign Missions $67,878 66, and the 561 which each gave nearly as much as to the six combined gave $24,772 57. The 1,606 charges together gave $92,651 23, or 86 per cent. of the total of $107,673.

It is safe to say that our sisters have not overdone their work at many points, and that in these very charges, giving these extra-proportionate amounts, ten have stopped short of what might properly and ought to have been done where one has gone beyond it. It is equally certain that as earnest a presentation of these six benevolences, by a method as well chosen and a purpose as strong and true and ambitious to raise the

needed money, would have resulted in collections for these proportionately as good as the one obtained by our sisters.

The same may be said of the general missionary collection. Then the managers of every one of the General Conference's benevolences would not have to limit, and often cripple by retrenchment, the plans of their agents in the field, cutting down the amounts pleaded for, and finding themselves unable to enter new fields of the most promising character; while seeing their sisters able to make appropriations beyond what is asked for by their agents in the field, and stimulated by the very funds committed and likely to be committed to their hands to seek new fields of useful operations.

The forty Conferences made notable by charges raising more money for Woman's Foreign Missions than for the six General Conference collections combined range as follows:

1 Ohio..

2 New York..

3 New England..

4 Michigan.

5 Cincinnati.

6 Iowa.

7 Baltimore..

8 East Ohio..

9 Detroit..

10 Rock River.

11 New York East.

12 Central New York..

13 Troy....

14 North Ohio.

15 Upper Iowa.

16 Des Moines.

In multiples of,
or nearly as
much as, for six
Gen, Conf. col-
lections com-

bined.

17 New England Southern.

18 Genesee.....

19 Minnesota...

20 North Indiana..

$5,760 25 21 N. W. Indiana...
4,989 72 22 Central Ohio...

4,438 00 23 New Hampshire..
3,923 62 24 Wisconsin.

3,732 05 25 Northern New York.

3,724 80 26 Erie..

3,623 08 27 Vermont..

3,597 52 28 Pittsburg..
2,941 35 29 New Jersey..
2,870 86 30 Central Pennsylvania...
2,375 11 31 S. E. Indiana...
2,064 50 32 Illinois
2,006 93 33 St. Louis.

1,969 74 34 Washington
1,904 23 35 Wyoming
1,836 95 36 Central Illinois..

1,778 00 37 Indiana.

1,622 00 38 Newark..

1,619 09 39 Kansas
1,606 51 40 Philadelphia..

In multiples of, or nearly as much as, for six Gen. Conf. collections com

bined.

$1,527 09 1,508 12

1,469 71 1,412 18

1,368 67

1,225 66

1,221 98

1,188 00 1,114 48 1,105 44 1,075 43

1,027 27

921 79

886 46

873 30

853 07

834 28

794 00

727 27

714 86

It is possible that a few of these large amounts may be the special contributions of one or more wealthy and benevolent persons, but is not likely that enough such could be named to greatly modify the showing. A large number of the churches above represented have also shown the noblest liberality on many occasions when worthy appeals for large sums have been made to them for various objects.

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE?

First, and above any other class, a majority of the presiding elders. Their office holds the key to the situation. They derive their importance chiefly from their being the custodians of general and connectional interests. It is their duty to bring the subject before every Quarterly Conference. They should do this with a knowledge of what has been done, and what ought to be done, and with a purpose and plan to get the charge committed to measures of improvement till the proper support is given to each benevolence. For this they have special facilities through the standing committees on each of them. The perfunctory way in which the disciplinary questions are asked, is utterly worthless in nineteen cases out of twenty. Presiding elders hold Quarterly Conferences in which they see several men who ought each to give more to several of the benevolences than the whole membership are in the habit of giving, and these men are often found on the committees on these benevolences. Here a little well-directed counsel and organization would be very effective, and produce great results. But, so sadly often no other influence comes from the elder than a little more smothering. Pastors are many who will say they have never had a word or an act of encouragement from the elder in this work, while they have had implied and sometimes direct and positive discouragement. What must be the effect of such words as these from an elder among his preachers and people?" I fear we are overdoing these collections to the injury of other interests nearer home." "We shall have to let you up on the benevolences." would not try to increase them." The authors of these words rank among the best in the eldership; they have been popular and have received honors, and are men of many and rare excellences of character; but are they not out of place when appointed to lead the Church to the performance of duty to such vital interests? Still, it must be admitted that they have only spoken what many others have habitually acted.

"I

It is not a little significant that one of the best informed, and at the same time one of the most efficient, elders remarked to the writer, as advocating this cause, "The presiding elders are all against you." This last remark was hyperbolical; a few

of them show favorable enthusiasm, as a few of them are exceedingly efficient in promoting these interests. So much so, that the benevolences could well afford to pay their salaries to keep them perpetually in the same office, and profit by the transaction, as would probably the other interests of the Church in similar degree. But the per centage of such is small, and one of the desiderata in Methodism is a class of presiding elders that will promote the benevolences as they deserve.

This evil has an encouraging feature-it can be easily remedied. Whenever a candidate is proposed for a district, let the Bishop ask in cabinet, What is his record respecting the benevolences? and other things being equal, let the answer determine the appointment; then a remarkable waking up will occur. In addition to this, let the results on each district be carefully tabulated, to bring out the progress or retrogress every year, and, at the end of the second year of inefficiency, return the elder to the pastorate. One such removal would inspire a Conference, and be worth thousands annually for years to the benevolences. The next class of persons bearing the most responsibility for the poor results is made up of those pastors who uniformly run down the collections on each successive charge. If a graduated tabulation be constructed showing the rank or comparative standing of each charge in the Conference, and if this be repeated for a term of years, placing the number for each year in its proper column opposite the name of the charge, then it will only be necessary to inclose in brackets the years included in each pastoral term to show how many progressing or declining terms there are in the Conference. If the names of the incumbents be written over the pastoral terms, the historical record will be complete, and the credit and responsibility will be established. In most cases a small minority of names will be found connected uniformly with the terms showing advance, while a larger number will be found uniformly with the terms showing declension. Between these extremes may be seen, among the varying terms, which ones have a generally upward and which a generally downward tendency.

The Newark Conference, which is one of the most suitable to be taken for an example, as being about one third of the way from the bottom of the better half of our Northern and older Conferences in respect to the support given to the

benevolences, has been thus tabulated for the last twenty-one years, during which time there were 1,977 pastoral terms, 787 of which show relative advance, and 983 show a decline, or stand too low to show decline, and 19 show a stationary grade. Omitting such as have served only one term, 29 pastors' names are always connected with advancing terms; 41 names are always connected with declining terms; 78 names are connected with many advances and few declines; and 98 are connected with many declines and few advances. The following is the

HISTORICAL TABULATION OF THE NEWARK
RANK TAKEN EACH YEAR BY EACH CHARGE
BENEVOLENCES:

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Bound Brook.

Stanhope and Waterloo.
Metuchin..

1874.

10

9

CONFERENCE

18515881873.

7

512 92 33 21 23 29 14 11 17 14 18

6

7

8 11 13 15
3 18
14 13 6 5

5

33 51 51 57 151 98 93 59 115
34 78 91 106 42 105 153 202

2

1872.

1871.

1870.
1869.
1868.
867.

1866.

1865.

1864.

1863. 1862.

SHOWING THE

IN SUPPORTING THE

South Orange.

Free Tabernacle, Hoboken.
Centenary, Jersey City,
Watsessing.
Spring Valley.

West Side Avenue,Jersey City 44 30 28 35 49 74 45 24 48 177

Haverstraw..

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6 8 12

9

17 15 19 18 10 6 8 14 11

11 12 12 8 9 13 12 12 22 31 27 105 20 34 61 74 98 104 111 110
12 1 7 9 7 3 3 5 8 4 3 4 4 5 2 4 3 1 7 8 4
13 21 55 56 34 47 210

14 62 99 79 71 59 54 46 50 76 95 75 91 57 102 104
15 14 11 13 13 15 10 15 16 16 26 65 53 117 36 61
16 28 1 38 32 98 111 31 28 82 90 99 80 53 47 101
17 19 19 21 49 29 35 35 14 12 38 12 53 43 54 41
18 206 998 95 204 8
19 16 24 21
20 7 13 7

22 17 24 29 23 15 22 15 40 96
21 14 16

12 12 17 20 31

21

9 17 12 2,

4 10 6 7 6 17 9 8 8

22 20 25 50 35 32 53 39 33 25 13 18 18 28 32
23 44 37 43 81 50 29 29 26 28 19 20 31 38 52 35

24 24 22 18 36 27 40 24 72 57 92 94 127

7 10 13 22 38 63 42 48
6 15 7 9
4 3

73 79 80 59 71 48 116 25 23 74 61 52 55 19

66 74 89 117

7. 23 130

30 24 28 25 66 109 117 79

25 35 50 42 36 37 52 53 65 39 33 17 13 12 14, 9 5 7 13 5 9
26 18 14 15 27 34 20 18 49

27 41 71 32 29 44 47 46 41 52, 39
28 22 39 20 25 22 29 21 51 66 40
29 33 29 45 95 124 59 69 65 60 84
30 37 36 90 89 143 129 72 137 117 151
31 29 21 17 21 24 25 24 30 23 25
32 40 46 34 51 40 111

86 100 61 44 51 25 27 24 34 26 21 38 1 1 5 11 19 18

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31 26 15 11 17 20 18 30 34
28 24 34 35 31 16 33 47 48 67
71 114 94 77 46 27 6 7 27
36 101

25 15 21 19 66 14 11 10 50 48

37 11 27 15 15, 17 26 37 37 37 47 50 75 102 81. 87, 76 83 74 86
15 17 26
38 23 76

39 26 64 71

35 52 74 47 51 34 44 63 42 74 34 47 56 36 24 8 21 51 45 83 51 36 31 54 58 95 63 110 135 127 136 115 123 151

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86 135 140 163 195 116 85 47 84 81 98. 16 23 24 24 16

40

41 15 30 35 20 17 15 17 29 36 74 118 105 132 130

42 39 32 26 73 204 171 169 180 193

43 50 63 45 46 57 102 53 65 143 102 85 63 99 50 41 88 48, 69 62 35

130 131 132 125

45 47 48 58 65 42 37 23 26 49 51 39 35 40 44 66 44 59 44 44 48
46 27 33 25 31 20 25 50 59 82 53 21 38 43 27 32 48 18 15 96
47 38 62 63 48 71 50 52 65 57 57 53 52 59 72 43 57 59 33 32 17
48 80 85 163 155 106 122 157 170 143 147 57 164

First Church, Hoboken.

49 58 65 48 42 40 41 96 93 96 163 177 164 25 23 16 31 22 19 19 15 Asbury and Travisville, S. I. 50 76 89 90 65 59 84 76 63 53 68 118 113 88 64 72 37 50 23 23 55 Chatham... 122 202 8 68 95 147 123 65

Mendham.

51 79 101 176 162
52 86 112 117 129 93 68 95 125 165 159 126 103 109 75, 68 80 83 93 71
53 88 60 68 149: 71 137 63 47 56 187 64
82

17 29

Green Village.
Andover..

Grace, Staten Island.

54 60 68:126 101 98 82 65 74 96112 106 136 101 113 77 129 135
55 43 43 75 36 79 171 16 13 141 19 44 127 140 142

Saint Paul's Jersey City
Arcola ..

56 48 52 63 34 30 32 28 31 33 29 23 11 13 12 21 11 16 11 12 6
57 57 56 44 92 55 41 110 12 13 187 177.

...

Fulton-street, Elizabeth.
Palisade, Jersey City.
Little Falls...
Roselle......

58 53 41 40 40 31 17 40 43 72 50 40 28 22 18 30 17 37 20 18 33
59 32 23 11 23 21 79 53 37 40 36 27 16 19 21 20 35 45 46 66 86
60 122 113 117 67 84 107 115 116 123 119 120 99 92 $1 89 96 67 114 126 127
61 90.103,186,185 204.210.110] 59.......
1......

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