Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub
[graphic]
[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

NOTICES OF HIS OPINIONS ON QUESTIONS OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT, NATIONAL

POLICY, AND CONSTITUTIONAL LAW.

BY GEORGE TUCKER,
PROFESSOR OF MORAL PHILOSOPHY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA.

-Itaque nulla alia in civitate, nisi in qua populi potestas summa est, ullum
domicilium libertas habet: qua quidem certe nihil potest esse dulcius; et quæ si æqua
non est, ne libertas quidem est.-CIC. DE REPUBLICA.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

PHILADELPHIA:

CAREY, LEA & BLANCHARD.

1837.

-

112AY OF THE LELAND STANTÜno JR. UNIVERSITY.

A. 40486 ENTERED according to the Act of Congress, in the year 1837, by Carey, LEA & BLANCHARD, in the Clerk's Office of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

MAR 29 7900

[merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

Difficulties of the New Administration. Mr. Jefferson's friendly advances

towards Mr. Adams. The recommendations of his new office. His arrival in Philadelphia. Interview with the President. Let to Mr. Madison on Public Affairs. State of Parties—their foreign predilections. Mr. Adams's Cabinet. Letter to Colonel Burr. The Government sends Envoys to France. Mr. Jefferson consults Mr. Madison concerning the letter to Mazzei. Appointed President of the American Philosophical Society.

9

CHAPTER II.

1798.

Important despatches received from the American Envoys in Paris.

The lively indignation it excited. Measures of the Administration. Mr. Jefferson's views. The conduct of parties. Mischievous effect of party spirit. Letter to John Taylor of Caroline. The value of the Union. Arrival of American Envoys from France. Their cordial reception. Dr. Logan. Illiberal suspicions against Mr. Jefferson. The Alien and Sedition Laws. Their influence on the public sentiment. Measures of the Opposition. Letter to Mr. Gerry. Mr. Jefferson's sanguine temper. Its advantages.

28

CHAPTER III.

1798.

Letter to Edmund Pendleton. Conciliatory course of the President to

wards France. Discord in his Cabinet. Letter to Kosciusko. Appointment of Ministers to France. Letter to Mr. Madison. ResoluVou. II.-1

tions of Virginia and Kentucky on the Alien and Sedition Laws: Unjust Censure of the late Envoys to France. Question concerning thc Common Law of England. Concerted operations of the Republican Party. Meeting of Congress. Death of Washington. Letter to Mr. Monroe. Proceedings of Congress. Letter to Gideon Granger. Aspersions on Mr. Jefferson. Letter to Dr. Rush. Moral influence of Cities considered. Presidential Election. Letter to Burr. The election of President devolves upon Congress. Proceedings in that body. Public anxiety during the Election. Thomas Jefferson finally elected. His letter to Mr. Monroe.

55

CHAPTER IV.

1801.

Party hopes and fears. Foreign relations of the United States. The

President's Inaugural Address. Its character. Letter to John Dickinson. Removals, from Office. Arguments for and against them. Messenger to France with the Treaty. Offers Thomas Paine a conveyance to America. His Justification. Letter to Dr. Priestley-to Mr. Gerry. His Cabinet. Political changes in New England. Abrogation of Forms. Remonstrance froin New Haven. The President's Answer. Its effects on Public Opinion. R. Livingston sent Minister to France. Instructions to him. A Squadron sent to Tripoli. Policy on the appointment of Ministers. Sketch of Parties. Circular to the Heads of Departments. He communicates with both Houses of Congress through the Speakers. The Message-assailed by the Federalists.

83

CHAPTER V.

1801-1802.

Proposed reforms of the Administration Party. Recent Judiciary Law

- views of parties as to its repeal. Internal Taxes. The Public Debts-mistaken views of both parties concerning it. The President's Financial Views. Convention with England. Cession of Louisiana to France. Lively interest excited by it in the United States. Mr. Jefferson's instructions to Mr. Livingston. Views of the effect of the Cession at Louisiana. Callender's Libels. Piers in the Delaware. Forbearance towards his opponents. The right of deposit at New Orleans interdicted by Spain. Meeting of Congress. Annual Message. Dry Docks. Resolution on the conduct of Spain. Mr. Monroe's mission to France-motives for the appointment.

110

« ПредишнаНапред »