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CHORUS

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Love's purer flames the gods approve;
The gods and Brutus bend to love:
Brutus for absent Porcia fighs,
And sterner Cassius melts at Junia's eyes.
What is loose love? a transient gust
Spent in a sudden storm of luft,
A vapour fed from wild desire,
A wand'ring, self-consuming, fire:
But Hymen's kinder flames unite,
And burn for ever one,
Chalte as cold Cynthia's virgin light,
Productive as the sun.

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SEMICHORUS.

25

30

Oh! source of ev'ry focial tye,
United wish, and nutual joy!
What various joys on one attend,
As fon, as father, brother, husband, friend!
Whether his hoary fire he fpies,
While thousand grateful thoughts arise,
Or meets his spouse's fonder eye,
Or views his smiling progeny;
What tender passions take their turns,
What home-felt raptures move!
His heart now melts, now leaps, now burns,
With rev'rence, hope, and love.

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CHORUS

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Hence guilty joys, diftastes, surmises,
Hence false tears, deceits, disguises,
Dangers, doubts, delays, surprises,
Fires that scorch, yet dare not shine:
Purest love's unwalting treasure,
Constant faith, fair hope, long leisure,
Days of ease, and nights of pleasure,
Sacred Hymen! these are thine.

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CHORUS III.

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I.
Dark is the maze poor mortals trcad;
Wisdom itself a guide will need:
We little thought when Cæsar bled
That a worse Cæsar would succeed.
And are we under such a curse
We cannot change but for the worse?

II.
With fair pretence of foreign forte,
By which Rome must herself inthrall,
These, without blushes or reinorse,
Proscribe the best, impoverish all.
The Gauls themselves, our greatest foes,
Could act no mischicfs worse than those.

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III.
That Julius, with ambitious thoughts,
Had virtues too his foes could find;
These equal him in all his faults,
But never in his noble mind.
That free-born spirits should obey
Wretches who know not how to sway!

IV.
Late we repent our hasty choice,
In vain bemoan so quick a turn.
Hark all to Rome's united voice!
Better that we a while had borne
Ev'n all those ills which most displcase,
Than fought a cure far worse than the disease.

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CHORUS IV.

Our vows thus cheerfully we fing,
While martial music fires our blood;
Let all the neighbouring echoes ring
With clamours for our country's good;
And for reward of the just gods we claim
A life with freedom, or a death with fame.

May Rome be freed from war's alarms,
And taxes heavy to be borne;
May the beware of foreign arms,
And send them back with noble scorn.
And for reward, c.

12

May she no more confide in friends
Who nothing farther understood
Than only for their private ends
To waste her wealth and spill her blood.
And for reward, &c.

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Our Senators, great Jove ! restrain
From private piques they prudence call;
From the low thoughts of little gain
And hazarding the losing all.
And for reward, &c.
The shining arms with hafte prepare,
Then to the glorious combat fly,
Our minds unclogg'd with farther care
Except to overcome or die.
And for reward, &*c.
They fight oppression to increase,
We for our liberties and laws;
It were a fin to doubt fuccess
When freedom is the noble cause,
And for reward of the just gods we claim
A life with freedoni, or a death with famc.

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IMITATIONS.

THE TEMPLE OF DEATH.

IN IMITATION OF THE FRENCH.

In those cold climates, where the sun appears
Unwillingly, and hides his face in tears,
A dismal vale lies in a desertifle,
On which indulgent Heav'n did never smile:
There a thick grove of aged cypress trces, 2
Which none without an awful horror fees,
Into its wither'd arms, depriv'd of leaves,
Whole flocks of ill-presaging birds receives :
Poisons are all the plants that foil will bear,
And winter is the only feason there:

10
Millions of graves o'erspread the spacious field,
And springs of blood a thousand rivers yield,
Whofe ítreams, oppress’d with carcasses and bones,
Instead of gentle murmurs pour forth groans.
Within this vale a famous temple stands, IS
Old as the world itself, which it commands;
Round is its figure, and four iron gates
Divide mankind, by order of the Fates:
Thither in crowds come to one common grave
The young, the old, the monarch, and the Nave. 20

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