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But our more amorous poet, finding love 25
Amidst all other cares, still hinés above,
Lets not the best of Romans end their lives
Without just foftness for the kindest wives.
Yet if ye think his gentle nature such
As to have foften'd this great tale too much, 30
Soon will your eyes grow dry, and passion fall,
When

ye

reflect 't is all but conjugal. This to the few and knowing was addrest, And now 't is fit I should falute the rest.

Most reverend dull judges of the pit, 35 By Nature curs'd with the wrong fide of wit! You need not care, whate'er you see to-night, How ill some players act or poets write; Should our mistakes he never so notorious, You 'll have the joy of being more censorious. 40 Shew your

small talent then, let that suffice ye; But grow not vain upon it, I advise ye. Each petty critic can objections raife; The greatest skill is knowing when to praise. 44

CHORUSES IN JULIUS CÆSAR.

CHORUS I.

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I. Wuituer is Roman honour gone? Where is your ancient virtue now? That valour which so bright has thone, And with the wings of conquest flown, Must to à haughty master bow, Who with our toil, our blood, and all we have befide, Gorges his ill-got pow'r, his humour, and his pride.

II. Fearless he will his life expose; So does a lion or a bear; His very virtues threaten those

JO Who more his bold ambition fear. How stupid wretches we appear Who round the world for wealth and empire roam, Yet never, never think what flaves we are at home!

III. Did men for this together join,

15 Quitting the free wild life of Nature? What other beast did e’er design The setting up his fellow-creature, And of two mischiefs chuse the greater?

Oh! rather than be flaves to bold imperious men, 20 Give us our wildness and our woods, our huts and

IV.

[caves again. There, fecure from lawless sway, Out of Pride or Enry's way, Living up to Nature's rules, Not deprav'd by knaves and fools, Happily we all should live, and harmless as our sheep, And at last as calmly dic as infants fall alleep. 27

CHORUS 11.

Lo! to prevent this mighty empire's doom,
From bright unknown abodes of bliss I comes
The awful Genius of majestic Rome.

Great is her danger; but I will engage
Some few, the matter-souls of all this age,
To do an act of just heroic rage.

'Tis hard a man so great should fall so low; More hard to let so brave a people bow Toone themselves have rais'd, who scorns them now.

Yet, oh! I grieve that Brutus should be stain'd, 19
Whose life, excepting this one act, remain'd
So pure, that future times will think it feign'd.

CHORUSES IN JULIUS CÆSAR.

CHORUS I.

1. Wuther is Roman honour gone? Where is your ancient virtue now? That valour which so bright has (hone, And with the wings of conquest flown, Must to a haughty master bow,

$ Who with our toil, our blood, and all we have befide, Gorges his ill-got pow'r, his humour, and his pride.

II.
Fearless he will his life expose;
So does a lion or a bear;
His

very virtues threaten those
Who more his bold ambition fear.
How stupid wretches we appear
Who round the world for wealth and empire roam,
Yet never, never think what slaves we are at home!

III. Did men for this together join,

IS Quitting the free wild life of Nature? What other beast did e'er design 'The setting up his fellow-creature, And of two mischiefs chuse the greater?

10

Oh! rather than be flaves to bold imperious men, 20 Give us our wildness and our woods, oor huts and

IV.

[caves again. There, secure from lawless sway, Out of Pride or Envy's way, Living up to Nature's rules, Not deprav'd by knaves and fools, Happily we all should live, and harmless as our sheep, And at last as calmly dic as infants fall asleep. 27

25

CHORUS IT.

Lo! to prevent this mighty empire's doom,
From bright unknown abodes of bliss I comes
The awful Genius of majestic Rome.

Great is her danger; but I will engage
Some few, the matter-souls of all this age,
To do an act of just heroic rage.

'Tis hard a man so great should fall so low; More hard to let so brave a people bow Toone themselves have rais'd, who scorns them now.

Yet, oh! I grieve that Brutus should be stain'd, 19
Whose life, excepting this one act, remain'd
So pure, that future times will think it fciga'd.

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