Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]

* Three of the following fianzas have been finely paraphrased by Dr. GOLDSMITH, in his cbarming Ballad of EDWIN AND EMMA; the reader of taste will have a pleajure in comparing them with i bevoriginals

And still I try'd each fickle art,

Importurate and vain ;
And while his passion touch'd my beart,

I triumph'd in his pain,

'Till quite dejeeted with my scorn,

He left me to my pride;
And fought a solitude forlorn,

In secret, where be dy'd.
VOL. II.

Bat

82

45

ANCIENT PO EM S.
And for his fake these weeds I weare,
And sacrifice

my

tender age ;
And every day Ile begg my bread,

To undergoe this pilgrimage.
Thus every day I fast and prays,

rayf

? And ever will doe till I dye ; And gett me to some fecrett place,

For soe did hee, and so will I.

[ocr errors]

50

ex

91

Now, gentle herdsman, aske no more,

But keepe my secretts I thce pray ;
Unto the towne of Walfingkam

Show me the right and readye way.

55

Now goe thy wayes, and God before !

“ For he'must ever guide thee ftill: “ Turne downe that dale, the right hand path,

And foe, faire pilgrim, fare thee well!”

60

[ocr errors]

But mine the sorrow, mine tbe fauk,

And well my life spall pay;
I'll seek the folitude be fought,

And stretch me where be lay.

And there forlorn despairing hid,

I'll lay me down and die:
'Twas for me that Edwin did

And so for bim will I.

* To Mew what constant tribute was paid to OUR LADY OF WALSINGHAM, I shall give a few extracts from the US

when the tiforf the Haugs6

66 bold

be fusionant

[ocr errors][subsumed][ocr errors]

83

[ocr errors]

ANCIENT PO E M S. "

turtu uj Nvorenumottatur Els port

Sext. XLIV.
Item, My Lorde ufith yerly to sende afore Michaelmas for his

Lordship's Offerynge to our Lady of W'ailyngebam. iiij d.
ITEM, My Lorde usith and accuftomyth to send yerely for the

upholdynge of the Light of Wax which bis Lordship fynd-
eth birnyng yerly befor our Lady of Walfyngham, contein-
ynge vj lb. of Wax in it, after vj d.ob. for the fundynge
of every lb. redy wrought by a covenant maid with the
Chanon by great, for the hole yere, for the findinge of the

said Lyght byrnynge, vi s. viij d.
Item, My Lord ujeth and accustometh to send yerely to the

Chanon that kepith the Light before our Lady of Walfyn-
gham, for his reward for the hole yere, for kepynge of
the said Light, lyghtynge of it at all service tymes dayly

thorowt the yere, xij d.
ITEM, My Lord useth and accustomyth yerely to sende to the

Prest that kepith the Light, lyghtynge of it at all service
tymes daily thorout the yere, iij s. iiij d.

XV.

K. EDWARD IV. AND TANNER OF TAMWORTH

Was a story of great fame among our ancestors. The author of the Art of ENGLISH POESIE, 1589, 410, seems to speak of it, as a real fact.Describing that vicious mode of speech, which the Greeks called Aceron, i. e. When we use a dark and obscure word, utterly repugnant to that «we frould express ;" he adds, Such manner of uncouth speech dįd the Tanner of Tamworth use to king Edward the fourth ; which Tanner, having a great while mistaken him, and used very broad talke with him, at length perceiving by his traine that it was the king, was

afraide

G2

[ocr errors][merged small]
« ПредишнаНапред »