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V. 98, 102. O gin, &c. a Scottish idiom to express great admiration.

V. 109, 110. Thame, &c. i. e. Tbem that look after omens of ill Luck, ill luck will follow.

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R E L I DU E S
OF ANCIENT POETRY,

&c.
SERIES THE SECOND.

BOOK I.

1.

RICHARD OF ALMAIG NE“.

A ballad made by one of the adherents to Simon de " Montfort, earl of Leicester, soon after the battle of Lewes,

which was fought May 14, 1264,"

-affords a curious specimen of ancient Satire, and fhews that the liberty, asumed by the good people of this realm, of abusing their kings and princes at pleasure, is a privilege of very long standing VOL. II,

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To render this antique libel intelligible, the reader is to undersiand that just before the battle of Lewes which proved so fatal to the interefits of Henry III. the barons had offered his brother Richard King of the Romans 30,cool. to procure a peace upon such terms, as would have divested Henry of all his regal power, and therefore the treaty proved abore tive. The consequences of that battle are well known ; the king, prince Edward his son, his brother Richard, and many of his friends fell into the hands of their enemies : while trvo great barons of the king's party, John earl of Warren, and Hugh Bigot the king's Juffici-ry, had been glad to escape inte France.

In the 18 stanza the aforesaid sum of THIRTY THOUSAND pounds is alluded to, but with the usual misrepresenta. tion of party malevolence, is asserted to have been the exorbie tant demand of the king's brother.

With regard to the ad A. the Reader is to note that Richard, along with the earldom of Cornwall, had the honours: of WALINGFORD and Eyre confirmed to him on his marriage with Sanchia daughter of the Count of Provence, in 1243.

Windsor Castle was the chief fortress belonging to the king, and had been garrisoned by foreigners : a circumstance, which furnishes out the burthen of each fianza.

The 3d ft. alludes to a remarkable circumstance, which happened on the day of the battle of Lewes. After the battle was loft, Richard king of the Romans took refuge in a Windmill, which he baricadoed, and maintained for some time against the Barons, but in the evening was obliged to surrender. See a very full account of this, in the Chronicle of Mailros. Oxon. 1684. p. 229.

The 4th ft. is of obvious interpretation : Richard, wbo had been elected king of the Romuns in 1256, and had afterwards gone over to take pobellion of his dignity, was in. the year 1259 about to return into England, when the barons raised a popular clamour, that he was bringing with him foreigners to over-run the kingdom; upon which he was forced to dismiss almost all his follozuers, otherwise the barons, zvould have opposed his landing,

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