Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub
[merged small][ocr errors]

ANCIENT POEM S.

127

IV.

Q. ELIZABETH's VERSES, WHILE PRISONER

AT WOODSTOCK. ,

WRIT WITH CHARCOAL ON A SHUTTER,

are preserved by Hentzner, in that part of his Travels, which has lately been reprinted in so elegant a manner at STRAWBERRY-HILL. In Hentzner's book they were wretchedly corrupted, but are here given as amended by bis ingenious Editor. The old ortkography, and one or two ancient readings of Hentzner's copy are bere restored.

OH

Hath fraught with cares my troubled witt! Witnes this present prisonn, whither fate

Could beare me, and the joys I quitt. Thou causedest the guiltie to be losed

5 From bandes, wherein are innocents inclosed :

Causing the guiltles to be straite reserved,

And freeing those that death had well deserved.
But by her envie can be nothing wroughte,
So God send to my foes all they have thoughte.

ELIZABETHE, PRISONNER.

A. D. MDLV.

V. THE

Ver. 4. Could beare, is an ancient idiom, equivalent to Did bear or Hatb borne. Sie below the Beggar of Bednal Green, ver. 57. Could say,

V.

THE HEIR OF LINN.E.

This old ballad is given from a copy in the editor's folio MS ; fome breaches and defects in which, rendered the infertion of life and Supplemental stanzas necessary. These it is koped the reader will pardona

From the Scottish phrases here and there discernable in this poem, it should seem to have been originally composed beyond the Tweed.

The Heir of Linne appears not to have been a Lord of Parliament, but a LAIRD, whose title went along with bis eflate.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
[merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors]
« ПредишнаНапред »