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Age. Names.

Sires.

Dams. 2 Symphony... The Craven Victor

Songstress.
Trimmer
Dapper

Truelove.
Valiant
Labourer

Volatile.
Vanquisher Ditto

Ditto.
Verity
The Craven Hannibal

Venus.
Vulcan
Labourer

Volatile.
Warrior....... Traitor

Wanton.
Waverley
Ditto

Ditto.
Wildair
Woldsman

Sybil.
Wishful .............
Ditto

Ditto.
Workman
Ditto

Ditto.
1 Bashful
Bachelor....

Volatile.
Bella
Boxer

Venus.
Bouncer
Ditto

Ditto.
Brusher...... Bachelor..

Volatile.
Caliban
Ditto

Comedy.
Careful
Chorister

The Craven Carnage.
Chieftain
Chaser...

Comfort.
Circe
Cardinal

Harlot.
Clasher
Chorister

The Craven Carnage.
Comely
Ditto

Ditto.
Constance ........
Bachelor................

Comedy.
Cressida
Chaser......

Comfort.
Criminal
Ditto

Ditto.
Critic..............
Chorister

The Craven Carnage.
Danger
Driver...................

Wary.
Dreadful
Woldsman

Damsel.
Druid......... Driver......

Gadfly,
Dulcet

Ditto
Hannibal
Harper

Beauty,
Helen
Ditto

Ditto.
Heroine.... The Craven Hazard

Nelly.
Hotspur
Ditto

Ditto.
Lady ...
Lawful

Destiny.
Leader
Ditto

Ditto.
Linguist
Ditto

Ditto.
Marmion
Chorister

Magic.
Mischief..
Ditto

Ditto.
Primrose
Boxer

Pastime.
Rambler
Romulus.

Darling.
Rapid
Ditto

Ditto.
Ditto

Carnage.
Rockwood......... Ditto

Darling.
TOTAL, FIFTY-EIGHT COUPLES.

Wary.

Rival ....

STEEPLE CHASES. GENTLEMEN Riders.

HALLATON, LEICESTERSHIRE. EVERYBODY knows that Leicestershire is the first hunting country in the world, and the Harborough district the best part of Leicestershire. A bona fide Steeple-race, therefore, over that country, for horses owned and ridden by farmers and graziers, could not possibly fail of being a sporting affair.

VOL. XIX. SECOND SERigs, No. 110,

L

The race in question appears, according to our information, to have been very strongly supported, if not originally suggested, by the Marquis of Waterford, who gave £25 as a commencement, on the principle, which we hope to see more extensively acted upon, that as he and other persons of rank and wealth enjoyed much diversion in riding over the land occupied by the farmers and graziers of Leicestershire, it would be the best requital to offer a prize for the best men and horses to compete for over their own country. A further subscription having been made at Melton, and various contributions added by neighbouring country gentlemen, a local Committee was formed at Hallaton, and all the necessary arrangements made, Henry Greene, Esq., of Rollestone, being appointed sole Steward and Umpire.— The Committee proceeded to advertise, and determined upon a line as nearly as possible over their own land, in order to prevent any complaints on the part of other occupiers. It would have been difficult to have found a better either in the county of Leicester or of Northampton--almost impossible to have found one equally good in any

other. The starting place was just under Mr. Vowe's well-known covert at Norton Hill a wood. The first fence was a small one into a grass field ; turning to the left, at about two hundred yards distance, was the second fence, where a choice was offered between a quick hedge and a strong post and rail into a long grass field affording good galloping ground. At the termination of this was a dumble, out of which was a fence, to be taken up-hill: it was one likely to yield, but not clearable, we conceive, by any horse whatever under such an unfavorable approach. After this the line continued over three more fields, with two out of the three rasping fences, to the lane leading from Hallaton to Allexton : out of this the parties contending had to clear a double post and rail into a large rough grass field, along which they galloped to the extreme flag, and, turning round this object, made their way back by an entirely new route. The next flag was placed in a soil heap in the boundaryfence of Horninghold; and the next to this high up the hill on the contrary side of the already-mentioned lane, which therefore had to be recrossed. Some large grass fields were then to be ascended into Allexton parish, forming a hill for half a mile or more; having gained the summit of which, the line ran along the top of it for some distance, and then, descending for about the third of a mile, concluded over four or five fields nearly on a flat, and ended exactly at the starting-post under Mr. Vowe's wood as before-mentioned. This was altogether an admirable line for the purpose, affording very little indeed of racingground, but an ever-changing variety over large grass fields, there being only about twenty fences, two or three very strong and wide. A great beauty was the facility for viewing the race from the hill—a fairer and better course, and one so well calculated for the spectators, could not have been selected. The distance was computed at four miles: in our opinion it did not exceed three and a half, and we are confirmed in this opinion by the time occupied in the race; they certainly went at score nearly the whole way, or after the first mile, but no four miles of so rough a character could be run in llmin. 8sec. ! as this was.

The advertisement, as might be expected, was answered by a numerous entry at 2 sovs. each, with from £30 to £50 added, £10 for

the second horse, and £5 for the third. The following is a list of the horses entered :Mr. Hodgson's br. g. Baronet, aged..

Mr. Owsley's b. g. Chester-mail, by Golumpus, Mr. Laughton's ch. g. Jack Robinson (thorough Mr. Owsley's gr, m. Britannia, 5 yrs. {aged. bred), by Phantom, aged.

Mr. Vowe's b. g. Marquis, by Thunder, aged. Mr. Simpkin's b.g. Sportsman, by Claxton, dam Mr. Vowe's bl. m. Firefly, aged. by Amadis, aged.

Mr. Park's br. g. Ruby, 6 yrs. Mr. Franks's br. g. Tam-o'-Shanter, 6 yrs. Mr. Guy's br. g, by The Flyer, 6 yrs. All of these came to the post on Thursday, April 11, excepting the last, who having been objected to as not the bona fide property of Mr. Guy-really belonging to Mr. Sprigg, by whom he had been run at Croxton Park for the Farmers' Piates, running second in each—he was, by the advice of Mr. Greene (the Steward), withdrawn, and the entrance money returned in consideration of the party giving no trouble. The horses looked well for the season, especially Jack Robinson and Mr. Vowe's two. Chester-mail, though light, looked fit to go. They

all in hunting condition, perhaps something lighter. Marquis, Sportsman, and Chester-mail are strong Leicestershire hunters; Ruby, a light cocktail racer; Jack Robinson, a lengthy thorough-bred, only 14 hands 2 inches ; Firefly, a creature with incomparable action standing about 15 hands. The grey mare had the character of being a remarkably good leaper. Mr. Hodgson's Baronet too had many friends who expected to see him win. The whole formed an excellent Field, with no decided favorite, and there was little if any betting. There were about five hundred horsemen present, with some pedestrians and a few carriages. After weighing, the riders and their steeds were ready a little before four o'clock, that hour having been fixed for starting to accommodate the gentlemen who had met the Pytchley hounds in the morning

Mr. Greene having given “ the word,” away went the Field. Marquis, ridden by Mr. Johnson, a farmer of not apparently much less than 55, out of practice, and not in robust health, was first over the fence, closely followed by Master Webster, a nephew of Mr. Vowe, on Firefly. All got well over. In the middle of the second field two parties were formed, Firefly leading the first at a wonderful pace, her head nearly in her rider's face, followed at twenty yards by Jack Robinson, who was most gallantly ridden by a young Gentleman named Bennett, and Ruby: the latter rushing into the fence together with Jack, the two had a most awful tumble into the third field. Mr. Bennett was a good deal hurt, but caught both horses, not knowing which was his own. Ruby's rider, having remounted, followed the ruck, and Mr. Bennett, who had great difficulty in climbing his saddle, followed: one arm being disabled, he was compelled to leave his whip. Ruby was about three hundred yards behind the others, and Jack Robinson at least five hundred.

In the meanwhile Marquis, keeping his lead, went over the post and rails, followed by Mr. Owsley on Chester-mail

, the rest close up. In the next field, which was long and level, they got together, crossed the dumble, Marquis first, Firefly second, and Chester-mail third. For the next half mile the pace was not destructive, and Jack Robinson got up amazingly fast, his rider being able to pull with one arm only, and having a deep cut in his leg. The second and third now changed places, Britannia coming forth, Firefly having a narrow escape of being

floored by the grey mare leaping upon her, nearly unseating her rider, and losing her some ground thereby. The Marquis still led, closely followed by Chester-mail; the others well up. After crossing the lane and turning the extreme flag, Mr. Owsley made one of those decisive hits by which more important events as well as steeple-races are sometimes won. Mr. Johnson, on Marquis, bore down upon a gate into the next field, and the rest followed, excepting Mr. O., who guided his “ Chester-mail” two hundred yards to the left, and took him over a wide double post and rail : by this he gained a decided lead, and began making very strong play, maintaining his advantage all up the hill. The Marquis was second, but crept up the hill without making any immediate effort to catch the Mail. Jack Robinson was now third, and Firefly, who had received another charge from the grey mare, fourth : the rest were tailing. On gaining the summit a large party of horsemen met them, who had been anxiously watching the race. We must here remark on the manifest and vile impropriety of horsemen behaving as these did (which by the bye is not an uncommon thing at steeple-races): no sooner are the first and second horses gone by, than they all close in, so that a jockey, confident of winning by making a waiting race, is completely shut out from any chance of success. On the present occasion their conduct was flagrantly bad. No sooner had Mr. Owsley passed, than several horsemen gallopped across the line, and Mr. Johnson had to pull the Marquis entirely out of his course to avoid a collision. Jack Robinson fared better, and got the second place; but Firefly, whose rider had intended taking what he considered a better line to the right for running in, was so crossed and jostled that she jumped like a cat into a sheep-penn to save herself. Luckily the gate was open, but she was thrown a field out of her line, and lost her chance entirely. Half a mile from home Chester-mail was 30 or 40 lengths in advance, Jack Robinson second, and Marquis some distance behind him. Every yard was now struggled for: Marquis, being much the freshest, gained ground rapidly, and jumped every fence admirably. At the last fence Mr. Johnson was so close up, that, had he gone at the gate, and got well over too, he would probably have won. The only negotiable part of the fence Chester-mail was clearly over first, and must therefore have had two strides start: the winning post was but one hundred and twenty yards farther; however he only won by half a length : three or four strides further his position would have been reversed. Jack Robinson was third, and Firefly who had, considering the youth of her rider, been uncommonly well ridden, came less distressed than any other, fourth. As young Webster's orders were to wait until the down-hill race, the crossing mentioned above deprived him of his chance. Jack Robinson too certainly ran to great disadvantage; indeed his rider must be a most brave and gallant fellow to get through the race at all: he struggled up to the last three fences most perseveringly and not without a chance.

The result shews that a large strideaway well-bred horse is required for the Harborough country. A fairer race was never run; but, in our opinion, two capital little nags were beaten by two good but not very fleet hunters ; and so we very much suspect it will be nine times out of ten over a country of this description. We cannot close our account

without relating a remarkable accident which befel the winner about two years ago, and to which he owes his name. A servant was riding him on the road, when, shying at something, he was knocked down by the leaders of the Chester-mail, which was running at the rate of about twelve miles an hour. Luckily the man was projected a safe distance, but horses, coach and all, passed fairly over the prostrated animal. Though a good deal blemished, he was not much hurt, and ran a sound and very honest horse for the Hallaton Steeple-chase. It was pretty evident, however, that he was deeply indebted to the nerve and practical experience as well as superior jockeyship of his master.

We trust that the good will the Meltonians have gained by this affair will induce them to patronise a similar event annually, and perhaps to get up another on the opposite side of the county under like regulations.

Stratford-on-Avon, April 17.-The two races announced drew together a vast concourse of spectators—the first, a Sweepstakes of 10 sovs. each, with 60 added ; and the second, a Sweepstakes of 3 sovs. with 25 added. Mr. Elmore's Lottery, ridden by J. Mason, at 2 to 1 on him, shewed his superiority to all competitors, beating easily by four lengths Mr. Jones's Decider (Hardy), Mr. C. Marshall's Railroad (Powell), Mr. Cockbill's Little-boy (Martin), Mr. Vevers's Charity (Barker), and Mr. Symonds's Aerator (Owner), a nice young mare to look at from Oxford.--Mr. W. Marris's Peter Simple fell, and staked himself in the right shoulder; Mr. Bradshaw's Daring Ranger fell at a fence, and “ coming it" a second time at a gate, did not again;" and Mr. Sutton's Peasdorf, after one purl, stopped sulkily in a brook. Mr. Theobald's Paulina, Mr. C. Marshall's Foreigner, and Mr. Brown's Harry meant to have had a shy, but altered their minds. -For the second event sixteen horses appeared at the post (Mr. Ball's Needwood drawn), and afforded a splendid sight, and a good race between five-it was won by Mr. Laughton's Jack Robinson (Roots) beating Mr. Stevenson's Betsey (Barker), Mr. Smith's The Comet (Martin), Mr. Walker's Sportsman (Owner), and Mr. Hackett's Liberty (Parker). Of the others, Charley Bates was knocked down ; Mr. Marshall's Foreigner fell lame, and was pulled up; Mr. Jenkins's br. h. was put hors de jeu about half way ; Mr. Hooton's Harlequin, in taking a brook, quietly reposed on the bank on the opposite side; and Mr. Jones's Baskerville was s done brown.” We need only mention the others, for at the finish they were nowhere-Mr. Grimes's b. g. by Maresfield, Mr. Hartley's Brandy, Mr. J. Lowe's Beggar-boy, Mr. Jones's Victoria, Mr. S. Smith's Ellen, and Mr. Whittaker na. Gamecock.

Wellington. --The village of Admaston, near Wellington, was “ blithe and gay on an April day” (the 17th), and hundreds of the neighbouring gentry congregated to witness the “ doings" of their friends, the stipulation being that the horses should be the property of, and ridden by, Gentlemen resident in the vicinity, and the prads not to exceed fifteen hands. Ten horses were entered, and eight appeared at the post (St. John C. Charlton and T. C. Eyton, Esqrs., the Stewards, having drawn their Severn and Admaston).- Mr. Haynes's Grace

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