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For sacred are the walls we rear

To guard our homes and shrines within,
And warn away the men who dare

With desperate hand our goods to win ;
For where no path invites to sin
The road sin is rarely trod ;

And thus the work we here begin
Is grateful in the sight of God?

Then rear the rampire, men of Ross,

And broad and strong the buttress build ;
And deep below scoop out the fosse

On every side to front the field ;

Let valiant men with sword and shield
Keep watch and ward upon your wall ;

But oh, remember, man will yield,

And buttress sink, and rampire fall !
And foes by force may win the town,

And waste the same with fire and sword;
May pull the proud man's palace down,

And bear away the rich man's horde ;

But he who in thy city, Lord,
Hath built his dwelling firm and sure,

No need hath be for watch or ward
Whilst thou, Eternal, shalt endure !

How shall we build for Heaven above

With hands so weak and works s rude ?
Build only thou on faith and love

And God will make the structure good ;

Cemented with a Saviour's blood
That strong foundation shall not fail,

Nor 'gainst it Time's eternal flood
Nor gates of Death and Hell prevail !

Then rear the rampire, men of Ross,

And broad from every tower and wall
Hang forth the banner of the Cross,

And boldly to the foeman call,

The beams may break, the stones may fall,
We have another citadel

Where, high in Heaven beyond your thrall,
The armies of the faithful dwell!

The liberal Lady Rosabel

To wall your town her gold hath given,
Oh, serve your benefactress well,

And build the rampart fair and even ;

But He by whose dear bounty shriven
You gain the gates of life above,

Serve Him with prayer and praise to Heaven,
Serve Him on earth with peace and love !

“ The ladies' carol ; and the events story twice, and some of the rhymes which followed, I must consider of," therein waxing faint in my said Turlogh, “for I only heard the memory.”

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163

THE SURGEON.GENERAL'S INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH. No. II.

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102

193

204

THE GRAVE OF TWO SISTERS
OUR PRESENT POSITION-MORE PLAIN WORDS BY A PLAIN THINKER
NOTE BY THE EDITOR ON THE LETTERS OF A CONSERVATIVE WHIG
MRS. HALL'S "TALES OF WOMAN'S TRIALS”-LADY DACRE'S "TALES

OF THE PEERAGE AND THE PEASANTRY".
THE ROYAL HOSPITAL, KILMAINHAM
THE MUSIC OF NATURE
THE BIBLE AND CROWN-A NEW BALLAD, TO BE SAID OR SUNG IN ALL CHURCHES

AND MEETING-HOUSES THROUGHOUT THE LAND

205

224

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228

1

DUBLIN.

WILLIAM CURRY, JUN. AND COMPANY.

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, AND CO., LONDON.

SOLD BY ALL BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM,

Gallery of Illustrious Irishmen. No. II. Grattan—in our next.

We have a few words to say upon certain matters connected with the University of Dublin, and we had availed ourselves of the appearance of the University Calendar (which by the way was very late in its publication this year) to throw our sentiments upon these points into the shape of a review.

Want of space obliges us reluctantly to postpone our paper on these subjects. Next month we shall have something to say touching academic matters; we will not forget Dr. Sadleir, of whom we have heard some strange things; we will have a word, too, on the new system of tutor's emoluments, and many other little topics that ought not to be altogether forgotten by the public.

Why did we not receive at an earlier period that beautiful and splendid volumethe Literary Souvenir ? It does not indeed deserve to be regarded as an annual. Its embellishments are too exquisite to be forgotten with the passing away of the Christmas season—it is a volume at all times åt to be presented as an offering of friendship but still it bears the appearance and shape of an annual—and long before it reached our editorial table, our last number had been read by all the Tories and half the Radicals of the empire. Had it reached us earlier we would gladly have devoted a few pages to an examination of its merits. But the book will still be bought and admired; to any one with an eye to be charmed by the most exquisite productions of art, it carries with itself a better recommendation than any we could give it.

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WHEN our readers shall have ac are, at present, any who are sceptical quainted themselves with the contents as to the result of the exertions of our of the pamphlet which we now pro- able missionaries, we do think that the pose to bring under their view, they work before us must entirely dispel will, we think, acknowledge that we their doubts ; which we regard with have no reason to regret the earnest- peculiar interest, coming from the ness with which we urged the sending quarter that it does, and being, as it into England and Scotland a Protest- were, the first fruits of the newly ant deputation. To many, who were formed Protestant associations. timid, the project seemed rash ; to Mr. Colquhoun, of Killermont, is others, whose love had waxed cold, it well known in Scotland, and cannot seemed foolishness ; there were those be altogether unknown to many of our who had serious thoug of relinquish- readers. He was, in the last paring the struggle against the powers liament, returned by the radical interest of evil, as being altogether hopeless, as the member for Dumbartonshire; and who, having, as they thought, and, we believe, entered the House of counted their cost, were desirous of Commons with as many prejudices sending an ambassador to the enemy, against Irish Protestants and Orangeand treating of terms of peace, lest with men as were entertained by any other their ten thousand they should not be of his party. But they were the preequal to a contest with his twenty thou- judices of a fair-minded man; and were sand; and there were those who never not retained longer than they were found had been hearty in the good cause, and to be reasonable. Mr. Colquhoun lost who were only anxious for the time no opportunity of testing the accuracy when they might quietly pocket the of those representations, which igwages of their treachery and desertion. norant, or malignant, or interested To all these the proposal of sending individuals have circulated to the prechosen men into England and Scotland, judice of the Conservative party in by whom our condition might be made this country; and, although he comknown, was received with coldness and menced his inquiries merely with a distrust ; and little better was expected view of fortifying his previous opinions, by one part of them, or desired by and without the slightest suspicion of another, than that it should end in frus the course to which they would lead, tration and disappointment. But if there yet when that course was clearly in

• Ireland-Popery and Priestcraft, the cause of her misery and crime. By J. C. Colquhoun, Esq. of Killermont. Published under the superintendence of the Glasgow Protestant Association.

Strictures on the Letter of the Right Rev. Dr. Murray, Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin, relative to Dens' Theology. By a Lay Protestant. Milliken, Dublin.

VOL VII.

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