Commodity & Propriety: Competing Visions of Property in American Legal Thought, 1776-1970

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University of Chicago Press, 15.04.2008 г. - 496 страници
Most people understand property as something that is owned, a means of creating individual wealth. But in Commodity and Propriety, the first full-length history of the meaning of property, Gregory Alexander uncovers in American legal writing a competing vision of property that has existed alongside the traditional conception. Property, Alexander argues, has also been understood as proprietary, a mechanism for creating and maintaining a properly ordered society. This view of property has even operated in periods—such as the second half of the nineteenth century—when market forces seemed to dominate social and legal relationships.

In demonstrating how the understanding of property as a private basis for the public good has competed with the better-known market-oriented conception, Alexander radically rewrites the history of property, with significant implications for current political debates and recent Supreme Court decisions.
 

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Съдържание

Introduction
1
Part One The Civic Republican Culture17761800
19
Part Two The Commercial Republican Culture 18001860
89
Part Three The Industrial Culture 18701917
241
Part Four The Late Modern Culture 19171970
303
Epilogue
379
Notes
387
Index
471
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Информация за автора (2008)

Gregory S. Alexander is the A. Robert Noll Professor of Law at Cornell Law School. He is the author or coauthor of several books, including Global Debate over Constitutional Property: The Competing Visions of Property in American Legal Thought, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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