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remarked, like a queen-regnant ly asked, looking at him for a · with her ladies-in-waiting in close second, “are you grateful to attendance.

her?" Minory, you ought to be the For drawing off the crowd," Sleeping Princess, said little he promptly returned. Maud Beaufort.

" But, indeed, they are all very “I'd rather be the Waking kind.” Princess, dear, and be able to run “ Including that old mummy, about like you.”

Gore,”—this sarcastically.

" But “ No," returned the child, “that who could be anything but kind to would not do. You know the you? What I meant Sleeping Princess lay just as you and he stopped. are, and then the Prince comes in "Well, what was it?" and wakes her with a kiss."

66 It was—well_that_that now, " It's a pity we have not a I had you to myself." Prince handy for you, dear," “You must surely have had too laughed Mrs Beaufort.

much of that at the Heronry.” “Miss Raymond has only to "I wish we were there again, choose," suggested Sir Piers. all alone."

“ Any of us here would gladly It was very nice then,” wisttake the part of the Prince." fully, and quite ignoring the dread

“ But, as you see, Sir Piers,” ful impropriety of her stay there returned Minory, colouring, “I with a solitary bachelor. am not a Princess, and I am 6. Wasn't it! And here, you see, not asleep, and so the Prince there are such lots of people, I here would be out of place." never get you alone.

Here she caught Jack's eye, he know, I've been thinking over all the time having said nothing, your name, Miss Raymond. It and apparently not much relishing is a very pretty one." this sort of badinage.

“Suitable," she said, saucily, you

wise to venture “ for a plain girl.” down?" he whispered, as he leant “I don't know about that, he over to pick up her handkerchief. hotly rejoined. “I know it's very

“Yes, really, I am very much suitable for you. better,” she said, in the same tone, Half rising on her elbow, and thanking him with a grateful fixing on him a piercing glance, glance.

under which he quailed—“ Captain “ Well, we must not mob you Woolcombe, did you not say it in this fashion," put in Cicely, would set off a plain girl ?" always thoughtful for others. “So I did,” beginning to get a “Maudie, dear, come and show little uncomfortable, “and I say it me the pictures you had for me.” again ; and, par consequence, how

This created a diversion, and much more it must set off a lovely the rest of the company kindly girl!” took the hint and dispersed, leav- “Why, you distinctly said you ing Woolcombe and Miss Ray- couldn't imagine-yes, those were mond alone.

your very words

a pretty girl “I am sure I am much obliged going about with such a name.' to my sister," said Jack. “She “No; did I really ?" showing and you are great friends, I hope." signs of complete defeat.

"The greatest. I love her ex- never could have said that.” ceedingly. But why," she demure- “ Yes, you did, though."

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“Well, it shows," he stammered heavy rain, and, to the delight of in confusion, “how little I knew the men, there was, with the break about it.”

up of the frost, every prospect of a "Why, what more do you know good time for hunting. But the about it now, sir?"

day itself was hopeless : the state of “I know you-and-and- the roads, to say nothing of the

“ Hush! you are going to pay continued showers, kept all but the me compliments."

most enterprising indoors; and as • Never! I was going to tell the dull, dark, and cheerless evenyou the real honest truth. But ing fell, the party found themlet me know how you came by selves assembled in the drawingyour name.”

room over afternoon tea, with the “ Did you ever hear of a place gloom only broken by the bright called Minori ?"

flickering of the fire, which leapt “ No."

and sparkled on the hearth. “Well, there is such a village, The several inmates of the Manor and it so happens I was born there. House had grouped themselves It is quite close to Amalfi."

around Mrs. Beaufort, and the "I'll look it out in the map.” cravings for refreshment having

“I doubt if you will find it, as subsided, the question arose as to it hardly ranks as a town. How- what was now to be done. ever, there I was born, and I took “Well, for one thing," cried out my name from the place.”

Dick, “we ought all to be here." “How very interesting ! But “So we are, are we not?” asked it's my luck over again. Here's Mrs Beaufort. Dick!"

" Not a bit of it," responded “ Yes, here's Dick," said that Dick, who was reposing on the young scapegrace, sauntering up, easiest chair in the room, with his not in the least aware how little arms behind his head. he was wanted. " I'm come to “ You disgracefully lazy boy, sit relieve guard. Kate wants to see up and tell us who the defaulters you—at least she did ten minutes are,” commanded Cicely. ago-about to-morrow."

"I don't see Trevor and Enid." “ What about to-morrow?

“ You rude boy! what right “Oh, I don't know. She'll tell have you to call Miss Masham you.”

l?" asked Mrs Beaufort. There was no help for it, and “She asked me to—didn't she, Woolcombe had to retreat, to his Grace?" to the younger Miss disgust-finding out, after all, that Masham. Dick had mistaken his message, Upon my word, Dick, you are and that Mrs Beaufort had referred highly favoured,” said Jack, laughto some one else. That night ing. Woolcombe only caught a hurried « Oh, she calls me Dick, so it's word or two with Miss Raymond all square.' before she was carried away, but " Rather a one-sided bargain, the bright smile she gave him, and Master Dick," said Beaufort. the cordial clasp of her little hand, " But here are the delinquents." sent him into the smoking-room in And as he spoke, Trevor Woola delightful frame of mind, with all combe and the eldest Miss Masham the pleasures of anticipation as to sauntered in, in the most unconwhat the coming hours might bring cerned way. forth. The next day broke with “Why, where have you been,

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Do you

remarked, like a queen-regnant ly asked, looking at him for a · with her ladies-in-waiting in close second,

'are

you grateful to attendance.

her ?" Minory, you ought to be the " For drawing off the crowd," Sleeping Princess,' said little he promptly returned. Maud Beaufort.

But, indeed, they are all very “I'd rather be the Waking kind." Princess, dear, and be able to run “ Including that old mummy, about like you."

Gore,”-this sarcastically. “But "No," returned the child, “that who could be anything but kind to would not do. You know the you? What I meant Sleeping Princess lay just as you and he stopped. are, and then the Prince comes in "Well, what was it?” and wakes her with a kiss."

-well-that-that now, “It's a pity we have not a I had you to myself.” Prince handy for you, dear," “ You must surely have had too laughed Mrs Beaufort.

much of that at the Heronry.« Miss Raymond has only to "I wish we were there again, choose," suggested Sir Piers. all alone."

Any of us here would gladly “ It was very nice then," wisttake the part of the Prince.' fully, and quite ignoring the dread

“ But, as you see, Sir Piers,” ful impropriety of her stay there returned Minory, colouring, “I with a solitary bachelor.

not a Princess, and I am 66 Wasn't it! And here, you see, not asleep, and so the Prince there are such lots of people, I here would be out of place.” never get you alone.

Here she caught Jack's eye, he know, I've been thirking over all the time having said nothing, your name, Miss Raymond. It and apparently not much relishing is a very pretty one." this sort of badinage.

« Suitable, she said, saucily, "Are you

wise to venture “ for a plain girl." down ?” he whispered, as he leant " I don't know about that, he over to pick up her handkerchief. hotly rejoined. “I know it's very

“Yes, really, I am very much suitable for you. better,” she said, in the same tone, Half rising on her elbow, and thanking him with a grateful fixing on him a piercing glance, glance.

under which he quailed—“Captain Well, we must not mob you Woolcombe, did you not say it in this fashion," put in Cicely, would set off a plain girl ?" always thoughtful for others. “ So I did," beginning to get a “ Maudie, dear, come and show little uncomfortable, “and I say it me the pictures you had for me. again ; and, par consequence, how

This created a diversion, and much more it must set off a lovely the rest of the company kindly girl!” took the hint and dispersed, leav- “ Why, you distinctly said you ing Woolcombe and Miss Ray- couldn't imagine—yes, those were mond alone.

your very words — a pretty girl “I am sure I am much obliged going about with such a name. to my sister," said Jack. “She “No; did I really ?" showing and you are great friends, I hope." signs of complete defeat. “I

" The greatest. I love her ex- never could have said that." ceedingly. But why," she demure- “Yes, you did, though."

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"Well, it shows," he stammered heavy rain, and, to the delight of in confusion, “how little I knew the men, there was, with the break about it."

up of the frost, every prospect of a “Why, what more do you know good time for hunting. But the about it now, sir?"

day itself was hopeless : the state of “I know you—and-and- the roads, to say nothing of the

“ Hush ! you are going to pay continued showers, kept all but the me compliments."

most enterprising indoors; and as “Never! I was going to tell the dull, dark, and cheerless evenyou the real honest truth. But ing fell, the party found themlet me know how you came by selves assembled in the drawingyour name.”

room over afternoon tea, with the “ Did you ever hear of a place gloom only broken by the bright called Minori ?"

Aickering of the fire, which leapt "No."

and sparkled on the hearth. "Well, there is such a village, The several inmates of the Manor and it so happens I was born there. House had grouped themselves It is quite close to Amalfi."

around Mrs. Beaufort, and the "I'll look it out in the map." cravings for refreshment having

“I doubt if you will find it, as subsided, the question arose as to it hardly ranks as a town. How- what was now to be done. ever, there I was born, and I took "Well, for one thing,” cried out my name from the place.”

Dick, “we ought all to be here." “How very interesting! But

“So we are, are we not?” asked it's my luck over again. Here's Mrs Beaufort. Dick !

“Not a bit of it," responded “ Yes, here's Dick," said that Dick, who was reposing on the young scapegrace, sauntering up, easiest chair in the room, with his not in the least aware how little arms behind his head. he was wanted. " I'm come to “ You disgracefully lazy boy, sit relieve guard. Kate wants to see up and tell us who the defaulters you—at least she did ten minutes are," commanded Cicely. ago-about to-morrow."

“ I don't see Trevor and Enid." " What about to-morrow?"

" You rude boy! what right “Oh, I don't know. She'll tell have you to call Miss Masham

Enid ?" asked Mrs Beaufort. There was no help for it, and “She asked me to-didn't she, Woolcombe had to retreat, to his Grace ?" to the younger Miss disgust-finding out, after all, that Masham. Dick had mistaken his message, Upon my word, Dick, you are and that Mrs Beaufort had referred highly favoured,” said Jack, laughto some one else. That night ing. Woolcombe only caught a hurried “Oh, she calls me Dick, so it's word or two with Miss Raymond all square." before she was carried away, but " Rather a one-sided bargain, the bright smile she gave him, and Master Dick," said Beaufort. the cordial clasp of her little hand, “But here are the delinquents." sent him into the smoking-room in And as he spoke, Trevor Woola delightful frame of mind, with all combe and the eldest Miss Masham the pleasures of anticipation as to sauntered in, in the most unconwhat the coming hours might bring cerned way. forth. The next day broke with “Why, where have you been,

you."

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- It's very

Enid dear—the tea must be quite There was an instant search, but cold?'' asked Mrs Beaufort. only one of the two that had drop

" Thanks, dear—I like it cold. ped was recovered. Mr Woolcombe was showing me a « Oh dear!” cried Mrs Beaufort, stroke in the billiard-room.

in real distress, "how foolish of A jolly light to see strokes me ! The one missing is my by,” yawned Dick.

wedding-ring." " You incorrigible little villain, There

renewed effort from Harry Jocelyn sotto voce; made, and wanderers went all “ can't you let people enjoy them- over the carpet, but the ring was selves their own way?” Then not forthcoming, and presumably it aloud—“It so happens,” he pro- had rolled into some remote corner. nounced oracularly, there “ No, please don't search any some strokes at billiards that al- more, ,” said Mrs Beaufort, colourways come off best when there's ing, however, with annoyance at not too much light."

her peculiar loss: “True for you old man,” said aggravating, but I've only myself Trevor good-naturedly, laughing. to blame. Before we go up to • Pitch that fellow Dick over the dinner we can have another look." arm of the chair, and make him “ The very thing,” said Dick; shut up.”

"the word search made me think Here a diversion was made by of it. Look here! let's have the Mrs Evesham saying that, as they thought game." were all present, it now had to be de- " But how is it done?asked cided what they should do. Danc- some one. ing was veteod, because Minory “Oh, easy enough. You place could only just manage to hobble; something somewhere, and then the charades were thought slow ; and searcher has to look for it.” dumb crambo would not do, for - Rather vague.

Why, how there was not enough audience. ever can he find it?” demanded

Lights were just then brought in, Jack. and something like a redistribution “Oh, easily," answered Dick. of places took place as the tea things “We'll hide a thing and blindwere taken away. Mrs Beaufort, fold you, and I'll bet you find it." however, sat considering, twisting “Of course, if you take him up her rings off and on her fingers. to it,” said Trevor.

"I call you all to witness,” " I'm not going to take him up called out Tom Beaufort, “ that if to it. I merely go with him to Kate persists in playing with her prevent his tumbling over the rings, and taking them off as she chairs. You'll see it's all fair." does, she'll some day lose them.” “But,” protested Jack, “I must

“Nonsense, dear! I never lose see what it is I am to find.” them. There, see! I take them “Of course. Look here! there's all off.”

this bit of string. You see it?” "What! even your wedding- “I can venture so much. Yes, ring?" asked Mrs Evesham in I see it." horror.

" Then we will now blind your " Even so.

Look here! there's eyes. Some one tie a handkerchief the lot !” and she gave the spark- tight around his head.” ling brilliants a little toss in the This operation being performed, air, but somehow missed the catch, Woolcombe was turned round three and two rings fell to the ground. times, and stood motionless, while

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