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Ir. Jarvis, the writer of the letter fra we given this extract, had once, as be intens :, the intention of having a cenotar.sc.

memory of Mr. Sheridaa's father, : urch of Margate. * With this sie berei Dr. Parr for an Inscription, and te f** the tribute to his old friend with side arned and kind-hearted man supplied 22:s. This monument, A. D. 1824, as by sis 5.00 ected to the memory of Thomas Steritza. Es.. .ed in the neighbouring perish of St. Jobs, Azisi 788, in the 6th year of his aze, and, we us wn request, was there baried. He was y a Dr. Thomas Sheridan, the brother of Dr. Lá conscientious non-juror, who, in 1561, wa deres :he Bishopric of Kilmore. He was the sad Dr. Thomas Sheridan, a profound scholar and endset wierinde. intimately connected with Dean Soad size 15 trious writers in the reign of Queza Azze. He ne husband to the ingenious and amiable ar si o Biddulph, and several drarnatic pieces avariere He was father of the celebrated oras ar zat. Richard Brinsley Sheridan. He had beza be wissie fellow, and, through lise, was the one amiable Archbishop Markham. He was the free, the learned Dr. Sumner, master of Harrow Siers, ed the well-known Dr. Part. He took his Estatical

Though this idea was relinquisbed, it was that a friend of Mr. Jarvis, with a real for the meant **2016 'honourable to him, has recenu, care a menos

Thomas Sheridan to be raised in the earth

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he himself, having been travelling the preceding night, required some short repose. I complied with his request, and remained at the father's bedside till relieved by the son, about three o'clock in the morning ;-he then insisted on taking my place. From this time he never quitted the house till his father's death; on the day after which he wrote me a letter, now before me, of which the annexed is an exact copy :

Friday Morning "I wished to see you this morning before I went, to thank

you for your atttention and trouble. You will be so good to give the account to Mr. Thompson, who will settle it; and I must further beg your acceptance of the inclosed from myself.

I am, Sir,
6. Your obedient Servant,

6R. B. SHERIDAN." so I have explained to Dr. Morris (who has informed you

will recommend a proper person), that it is my desire to have the hearse, and the manner of coming to town, as respectful as possible.'

• The inclosure, referred to in this letter, was a banknote of ten pounds,- -a most liberal remuneration. Mr. R. B. Sheridan left Margate, intending that his father should be buried in London ; but he there ascertained that it had been his father's expressed wish, that he should be buried in the parish next to that in which he should happen to die. He then, consequently, returned to Margate, accompanied by his brother-in-law, Mr. Tickell, with whom, and Mr. Thompson and myself, he followed his father's remains to the burial-place, which was not in Margate church-yard, but in the north aisle of the church at St. Peter's."

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Mr. Jarvis, the writer of the letter from which I have given this extract, had once, as he informs me, the intention of having a cenotaph raised, to the memory of Mr. Sheridan's father, in the church of Margate. * With this view he applied to Dr. Parr for an Inscription, and the following is the tribute to his old friend with which that learned and kind-hearted man supplied him

6. This monument, A. D. 1824, was, by subscription, erected to the memory of Thomas Sheridan, Esq., who died in the neighbouring parish of St. John, August 14, 1788, in the 69th year of his age, and, according to his own request, was there buried. He was grandson to Dr. Thomas Sheridan, the brother of Dr. William, a conscientious non-juror, who, in 1691, was deprived of the Bishopric of Kilmore. He was the son of Dr. Thomas Sheridan, a profound scholar and eminent schoolmaster, intimately connected with Dean Swift and other illustrious writers in the reign of Queen Anne. He was husband to the ingenious and amiable author of Sidney Biddulph, and severaldramatic pieces favourably received. He was father of the celebrated orator and dramatist, Richard Brinsley Sheridan. He had been ihe schoolfellow, and, through life, was the companion, of the amiable Archbishop Markham. He was the friend of the learned Dr. Sumner, master of Harrow School, and the well-known Dr. Parr. He took his first academical

* Though this idea was relinquished, it appears that a friend of Mr. Jarvis, with a zeal for the memory of talent highly honourable to him, has recently caused a monument to Mr. Thomas Sheridan to be raised in the church of St. Peter.

76 MEMOIRS OF R. B. SHERIDAN. degree in the University of Dublin, about 1736. He was honoured by the University of Oxford with the degree of A. M. in 1758, and in 1759 he obtained the same distinction at Cambridge. He, for many years, presided over the theatre of Dublin ; and, at Drury Lane, he in public estimation stood next to David Garrick. In the literary world he was distinguished by numerous and useful writings on the pronunciation of the English language. Through some of his opinions rán a vein of singularity, mingled with the rich ore of genius. In his manners there was dignified ease ;-in his spirit, invincible firmness ;-and in his habits and principles, unsullied integrity."

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MR. SHERIDAN had assuredly no reason to complain of any deficiency of excitement in the new career to which he now devoted himself. A succession of great questions, both foreign and domestic, came, one after the other, like the waves described by the poet, “ And one no sooner touch'd the shore, and died,

Than a new follower rose, and swell’d as proudly.” Scarcely had the impulse which his own genius had given to the prosecution of Hastings, begun to abate, when the indisposition of the King opened another field, not only for the display of all his various powers, but for the fondest speculations of his interest and ambition.

The robust health and temperate habits of the Monarch, while they held out the temptation of a long lease of power to those who either enjoyed or were inclined to speculate in his favour, gave proportionably the grace of disinterestedness to the followers of an Heir-Apparent, whose means

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