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THE

LIVES

THE LORD CHANCELLORS

KEEPERS OF THE GREAT SEAL

ENGLAND,

FROM THE EARLIEST TIMES TILL THE REIGN OP
KING GEORGE IV.

BY
JOHN LORD CAMPBELL, LL.D. F.B.S.E.

IN SEVEN VOLUMES.

VOL. VII.

SECOND AMERICAN,
FROM THE THIRD LONDON EDITION.

PHILADELPHIA:

BLANCHAED AND LEA.
1851.

CONTENTS

LIFE OF LORD CHANCELLOR ELDON FROM HIS BIRTH TILL HIS MARRIAGE.

Laf tihe Lives of the Lord Chancellors, 33. The Author's Advantages and

Difficulties in writing this Memoir, 33. Lord Eldon's fabulous Descent from

the Magician, Sir Michael Scott, 33. His true Pedigree, 34. His Mother,

frightened by the Rebels in 1745, is brought to bed of her eldest Son in the

County of Durham, 36. Birth of John Scott, Lord Eldon, 36. His Infancy,

37. He is taught to read, 37. He is at the Grammar School under Mr. Moises.

37, Early Manifestation of the different Characters of William and John Scott,

37. Stories told by Lord Eldon of himself when he was a Schoolboy, 38. Pro-

gress of John Scott in his Studies at School, 39. His Affection for his Master, 39. His Father about to bind him Apprentice to the Business of a Coal Fitter'

40. His brother William advises that he should be sent to Oxford, 40. His

Journey thither, 40. His Matriculation, 40. He is elected a Fellow of Uni-

versity College, 41. He is intended for the Church, 41. Bad Puns, 41. His

Examination for the Degree of B. A., 42. He gains the Prize for the English

Essay, 43. Specimens of his Composition, 43. His Modesty, 44. Humorous

Letter from him to a Fellow Student, 45. His Prospects, 45. Change of his

destiny by Marriage, 45. Courtship of John Scott and Bessy Surtees, 46. They

fall in love with each other at first Sight, 46. They are engaged, 46. Obsta-

cles to their Union, 46. Their Flirtations, 47. His Family relent, 47. Hers

inexorable, 47. She is sent on a visit to Relations in London, 48. He pursues

her, 48. His Letter to a Confidant, 48. Her Family try to force her to marry

another, 50. She elopes with Mr. Scott, 50. They are married in Scotland,

51. Their Wedding-night, 52. Conduct of his Family on this Occasion, 52.

They are forgiven by his Father, 52. Her Father long implacable, 52. Plan

of making the future Chancellor a Grocer, 53. Letter from him explaining his

Feelings and Views, 53. His exemplary Conduct as a married Man, 54. Her

parents are reconciled to her, 55. Settlement on Mr. and Mrs. John Scott, 56.

Letter from Lord Eldon to his Father-in-law, 56. They are re-married at New-

castle, 57. They bid a final Adieu to Newcastle, 57.

CHAPTER CXCII.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD ELDON TILL HE WAS CALLED TO THE BAR.

Mr. John Scott takes to the Study of the Law, and is entered of the Middle Tern

pie, 58. He officiates at Oxford as Vice Principal of New Inn Hall, 58. His

Lecture on "Men running away with Maidens," 58. He takes Pupils, 58.

His Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson, 5d. His first Judgment, 59. His vigorous'stu*
dy of the Law, 59. He falls into ill health, 60. He removes from Oxford to

London, 60. His " First Perch," and how he bought Sprats for Supper in Fleet

Market, 60. His Dislike of Lord Mansfield, 61. His Dialogue with Serjeant

Hill, 61. Letter from him, giving an Account of his Life when a Student, 62.

His joke against his own Practice of borrowing Books, and not returning them,

63. He abandons Literature, 63. His great Proficiency in Law, 63.

CHAPTER CXCIII.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD CHANCELLOR ELDON TILL HE RECEIVED A SILK

GOWN.

He is called to the Bar, 64. Inaccurate Representation by him of his Want of

Success, 64. How he was cheated out of his first Fee, 64. Adventure on his

first Circuit, 64. His first Year's Profits, 64. He is patronised by Stoney

Bowes, who married the Countess of Strathmore, 65. His Debut as a Mob

Orator, 65. He is Counsel before an Election Committee, 66. Death of his

Father, 67. He hires a House in Newcastle, and means to become a Provin-

cial Counsel, 67. His Diplomatic Arts, 68. Supposed Lawfulness of "White

Lies," 68. He removes to Carey Street, 68. His bad Start in the Court of

Chancery, 69. He again falls into ill Health, and consults Dr. Heberden, 69.

His Success on the Circuit, 69. He begins Business in the "Rope-walk," 70.

He is in danger of being robbed by a Client, 70. He again meditates retiring

as a "Provincial," 70. But gains great Distinction as an Equity Counsel, 70.

His Account of his Victory in Akroyd v. Smithson, 71. Incorrect Statement

of his having refused a Mastership in Chancery, 73. Danger to which he was

exposed in Lord George Gordon's Riots, 73. Compliment to the military

Prowess of the Lawyers, 74. His Account of the Distinction he gained before

an Election Committee, 74. Different Stories of the Manner in which he first

gained Distinction on the Circuit, 75. Q. Whether an Averment in a Decla-

ration for Assault and Battery by a Gentleman against a Lady, that "she as-

saulted and beat him with her Hand" be supported by Proof that she threw

her Hand of Cards in his Face? 75. Hobson's Choice, 76. How he got on by

breaking the Ten Commandments, 76. He fills the Offices of Attorney and So-

licitor General in the Grand Court on the Northern Circuit, 76. Indictment

against Sir T. Davenport for Murder "by a long Speech," 77. Compunction

of a successful Lawyer, 77. Hoax upon Jack Lee, 77. Boswell's Motion for

a Writ of Quare adhsesit PavimetitOjIS. Mr. Scott in danger of being drowned,

79. Responsibility of Parsons, 80. Trial by Jury, 80. Mr. Scott's Despon-

dency, 80. He goes to see Mrs. Siddons, 80. His Silk Gown, 81.

CHAPTER CXCIV.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD ELDON TILL HE WAS MADE SOLICITOR GENERAL.

Mr. Scott's Abstinence from Politics, 81. His private Sentiments on public Af-

fairs, 81. He agrees to come into Parliament to oppose the "Coalition," 82.

He is to be returned for Weobly, 82. His Speech to the Weoblyites, 82. Fail-

ure of Scott and Erskine in the House of Commons, 83. Scott's Scripturo-clas-

sico-pathetico-jocular Speech, 83. He is ridiculed by Sheridan, 85. Mr. Pitt

Prime Minister, 80. Mr. Scott's Promotion expected, but postponed, 85. Re-fusal of the Supplies, 86. Dissolution of Parliament, 86. Mr. Scott is re-elect-

ed for Weobly, 86. The Westminster Scrutiny, 86. Mr. Scott's Speech against

the Government, 87. He is praised by Mr. Fox, 87. He supports Warren

Hastings till Mr. Pitt takes the other Side, 88. His Speech for " Free Trade"

against those Whigs who were for " Protection," 88. He is made Chancellor

of the County Palatine of Durham, 89. His Exhortation to a Ward of his Court,

89. He supports a Bill to compel the E. I. Company to pay a Debt to the Go-

vernment, 89. Sir Philip Francis's Speech against Mr. Scott and the Lawyers,
90. Mr. Scott is made Solicitor General to the King, and knighted, 92. He

goes the Northern Circuit when Solicitor General, 93. Fines for Absence, &c,

93. Lord Eldon elected Solicitor General of the Circuit, 94. Prosecution by

Lord Eldon while Solicitor General, 94. Lord Eldon Attorney General, 94.

Bet by Lord Eldon that Dunning would be Chief Justice of the King's Bench,

96. Lord Eldon fined for entering the Assize Town before the Commission

Day, 96. Lord Eldon congratulated on his silk Gown, &c, 96. Resolution

moved by Lord Eldon against the Attorney and Solicitor General, 96. Lord

Eldon fined for not dining at the Circuit Table, &c, 96. Lord Eldon of signal

Service in executing the Process of the Grand Court, 97. Lord Eldon about to

become a Director of the E. I. Company, 97. Fined for asking Leave of Ab-

sence from the House of Commons to attend the Circuit, 97. Lord Eldon moves

Remonstrance to be presented to Mr. Justice Buller, for puffing Mr. Law on

calling him within the Bar at Lancaster, 97. Mr. Justice Buller's Puff on Mr.

Law,—supposed to have been written by Mr. Law himself, 98. Lord Eldon's

Report of what he had done in presenting the Remonstrance to Mr. Justice

Buller, 98. Charge against Lord Eldon of not making dull Speeches on the

Circuit,—but convicted of making dull Speeches and writing dull Paragraphs

elsewhere, 99. Lord Eldon guilty of " Huggery," 99. Lord Eldon congratu-

lated on being appointed Solicitor General to the King, knighted, &c, 100.

Where Lord Eldon found the Principles and examples by which he was ad-

vanced to Honour and Fame, 100. Entries in the Records of the Northern Cir-

cuit respecting Lord Loughborough, 100.

CHAPTER CXCV.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD ELDON TILL HE BECAME ATTORNEY GENERAL.

The King's illness, 94. Sir John Scott supports the Right of the two Houses to

elect a Regent, 101. Despotism of the Great Seal, 102. His Defence of giving

the Patronage of the Household to the Queen, 103. He maintains that the

Holder of the Great Seal for the time being is King of this Country, 103. The

King's Recovery, 104. Whig Rhymes on Sir John Scott and other Opponents,

104. Translation of Lord Belgrave's Greek Quotation, 105. By Sir John

Scott, 105. By Lord Thurlow, 105. Quiet Life of the Solicitor General for

four Years, 106. His Statement to George III. of his Gains, 106. Demonstra-

tion of Sir John Scott having grossly misrepresented to the King his Profits as

Solicitor General, 107. Q. Whether Hastings' Impeachment abated by the Dis-

solution of Parliament? 107. His equivocal Support of Fox's Libel Bill, 108.

His Statement of his Determination to resign on the Removal of Thurlow, 108.

He prosecutes a Man who challenged him for what he had said in the Discharge

of his duty at the Bar, 109.

CHAPTER CXCVI.

CONTINUATION OF THE LIFE OF LORD ELDON TILL HE WAS MADE CHIEF JUSTICE OF

THE COMMON PLEAS.

Sir John Scott's Conduct as Attorney General, 110. His Defence of the Prose-
cution of John Frost, lie. The Treason Trials in 1794, 111. How far Sir
John Scott to be blamed respecting them, 112. The Attorney General's Speech
against Hardy, 112. Anecdotes of this Trial related by Lord Eldon, 113. Im-
propriety of trying other Cases after the Acquittal of Hardy, 114. The Attor-
ney General charged with talking Treason, 115. Sir John Scott's "Good
Name," 115. Inheritance left by Sir John Scott to his Children, 115. Sir
John Scott's Defence of himself for instituting these Prosecutions, 116. Insuf-
ficiency of this Defence, 117. Legislative Measures of Coercion, 117. Discus-
sion on the State Trials in the House of Commons, 118. Insults offered to the
King going to Parliament, 118. The Treasonable Attempts Bill, 119. Object
and Operation of the new Law of Treason, 119. Sir John Scott's Boast of the

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