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And for all this can give no reason why :
This is an holy-fifter, verily.

Τ Η Ε

FORCE

OF LOVE.

PRESERVED FROM AN OLD MANUSCRIPT.

THROW

PHROW an apple up a hill,

Down the apple tumbles ftill ;
Roll it down, it never stops
Till within the vale it drops :
So are all things prone to Love,
All below, and all above.
Down the mountain flows the stream,
Up ascends the lambent fame ;
Smoke and vapour mount the skies ;
All preserve their unities;
Nought below, and nought above,
Seemns averse, but prone to Love.
Stop the meteor in its flight,
Or the orient rays of light;
Bid Dan Phoebus not to shing:
Bid the planets not incline ;
'Tis as vain, below, above,
To impede the course of Love,
Salamanders live in fire,
Eagles to the skies aspire,
Diamonds in their quarries lie,
Rivers do the sea supply:
Thus appears, below, above,
A propensity to Love.

Metals Metals

grow

within the mine,
Luscious grapes upon the vine ;
Still the needle marks the pole ;
Parts are equal to whole:
'Tis a truth as clear, that Love
Quickens all, below, above.
Man is born to live and die,
Snakes to creep, and birds to fly ;
Fishes in the waters swim,
Doves are mild, and lions grim :
Nature thųs, below, above,
Pulhes all things on to Love.
Does the cedar love the mountain ?
Or the thirsty deer the fountain ?
Does the shepherd love his crook ?
Or the wilļow court the brook ?
Thus by Nature all things move,
Like a running stream, to Love.
Is the valiant hero bold?
Does the miser doat on gold ?
Seek the birds in spring to pair ?
Breathes the rose-bud scented air?
Should

you

this deny, you ’ll prove
Nature is averse to Love.
As the wencher loves a lars,
As the toper loves his glass,
As the friar loves his cowl,
Or the millar loves the toll,
So do all, below, above,
Fly precipitate to Love.

A a 2

When When young

maidens courtship shun,
When the moon out-shines the sung
When the tigers lambs beget,
When the snow is black as jet,
When the planets cease to move,
Then Mali Nature cease to Love.

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N. B. This is delivered down by tradition as a production of that celebrated poet; and was spoken at the Westminster-School election, the following subject :

99

OVID.

“ Nullis amor est medicabilis herbis."
NOL

Which adds new flames to his celeftial fires :
Had any remedy for Love been known,
The god of Phyfic, fure, had cur'd his own,

SOL Daphne fees, and seeing her admires,

CON

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The Bookseller's Advertisement to the edition of 1674

25 To the Bishop of Lincoln

27 The Author's Preface to his Tuvenile Poems 28 To the Reader

30 CONSTANTIA AND PHILETUS

31 The Echo

35 The Song

37 The Letter. Philetus to Conftantia

46 Conftantia to Philetus.

47 The Song,

49 THE TRAGICAL HISTORY of PYRAMUS AND

THISBE To the Right Worshipful, my very loving Mafter Mr.

Lambert Olbolston, Chief School-Master of Westminfter School,

ibid. Pyramus

54

Аа3

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Pyramus and Thilbe
The Song
Epitaph

Page 55

59
63

SYLVA : OR DIVERS COPIES OF VERSES

MADE UPON SUNDRY OCCASIONS.

65

67

73

An Elegy on the death of the Right Honourable

Dudley Lord Carleton, Viscount Dorchester, late-
Principal Secretary of State

64
An Elegy on the death of my loving friend and cou.

sin Mr. Richard Clarke, Gent. late of Lincoln's.

Inn
A Dream of Elysium
On his Majesty's return out of Scotland

70
Song, on the same

72
A Vote
A Poetical Revenge

76
To the Dutchess of Buckingham

78
To his very much honoured Godfather, Mr A. B. 79
An Elegy on the Death of John Lyttleton, Esquire,

Son and Heir to Sir Thomas Lyttleton, who was
drowned leaping into the water to save his younger
brother

81
A Translation of Verses upon the Blessed Virgin,

written in Latin by the Right Worshipful Dr. A. 83
Ode I. On the praise of Poetry.

86
II. That a pleasant Poverty is to be preferred

before discontented Riches
III. To his Mistress

89
3

Ode IV.

87

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