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praise themselves and affect to underva Tue all other nations, they leave us, luckilý, trap-doors and back-doors open, by which we strangers, less favoured by natüre, may arrive at a share of their advantages. And thus they are, in some respects, like a boastful landlord, who exalts the value and flavour of his six-years-old mutton, while he is delighted to dispense à share of it to all the company. In short, you, whose proud family, and I, whose hard fate, made us soldiers of fortune, have the pleasant récollection, that, in the British service, stop where we may upon Our career, it is only for want of money to pay the turnpike, and not from our being prohibited to travel the road.se If; therefore, you can persuade little Weischel' to come into ours, for God's sake let him buy the ensigney, live prudently, mind this duty, and trust to the fates for promotion. -* ( 5111841 bs11331 any posW bir aisy

56 And now, I hope you are expiring with curiosity to learn the end of my ra: mance. I told you I had deemed it convenient to make a few days tour on foot among the mountains of Westmoreland, with Dudley, a young English artist, with whom I have formed some acquaintance. A fine fellow this, you must know, Delaserre-he paints tolerably, draws beauti, fully, converses well, and plays charming: ly on the flute; and, though thus well en. titled to be a coxcomb of talent,, is, in fact, va modest unpretending young man. Upon our return from our little tour, I learned that the enemy had been reconnoitring Mr Mervyn's barge had crossed the lake, I was informed by my landlord, with the squire himself and a visitor, stri w What sort of person, landlord?.c.tw

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Why, he was a dark officer-looking man, at they called colonel Squoire Mere vyn questioned me as close as had I been at sizes I had a guess, Mr Dawson' (I told you that was my feigned name)- But I tould him, nought of your vagaries, and going out a-laking in the mere a poights

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not I-an I can make no sport l’se spoil none and Squoire Mervyn's as cross as poy-crust too, mon-he's aye maundering an my guests but land beneath his house, though it be marked for the fourth station in the Survey. Noa, noa, e’en let un smell things out o' themselves for Joe Hod. ges.'- . . “ You will allow there was nothing for it after this, but paying honest Joe Hodges' bill, and departing, unless I had preferred making him my confidant, for which I felt jo no shape inclined. Besides, I learned that our ci-devant colonel was on full retreat for Scotland, carrying off poor Julia along with him. I understand from those who conduct the heavy baggage, that he takes his winter quarters at a place called Woodbourne, in mi shire in Scotland He will be all on the alert just now, so I must let him enter his entrenchments without any new alarm. And then, my good colonet, to whom I owe so many grateful thanks, pray look to your defence. .." I protest to you, Delaserre, I often think there is a little contradiction enters into the ardour of my pursuit. I think I would rather bring this haughty insulting man to the necessity of calling bis daughter Mrs Brown, than I would wed her with his full consent, and with the king's permission to change my name for the stile and arms of Mannering, though his whole fortune went with them. There is only one circumstance that chills me a little Julia is young and romantic. I would not willingly hurry her into a step which her Tiper 'years might disapprove +no ;-nor would I like to have her upbraid me, were

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it but with a glance of her eye, with ha• ving ruined her fortunes far less give her

reason to say, as some have not been slow to tell their lords, that, had I left her time

for consideration, she would have been wi. -serránd done better. No, Delaserie-this - must not be: The picture presses close upon me; because I am aware a girl in Julia's situation has no distinct and precise idea of the value of the sacrifice she makes. She knows difficulties only by name, and if she thinks of love and a farm, it is a ferme ornée, such as is only to be found in "poetic description, or in the park of a gentleman of twelve thousand a-year. She would be ill prepared for the privations of that real Swiss cottage we have so often talked of, añd for the difficulties which must ne. cessarily surround us even before we attained that haven. This must be à point clearly'ascertained. Although Julia's beauty and playful tenderness have made an impression on my heart never to be era. sed, I will be satisfied that she perfectly understands the advantages she foregoes, before she sacrifices them for my 'sake. 19.1 --*** Am I toð' proud, Delaserre," when I trust that even this trial "may terminate favourably to my wishes ?-Am I too vain when I suppose, that the few personal qualities which I possess, with means of competence however moderate, and the determination of consecrating my life to her

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