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PREFACE.

TN the preparation of this volume, we have aimed to make it a comI plete and sufficient work for advanced classes in Reading, Elocution, and English and American Literature; to furnish, in an available form, such an amount of biographical, historical, classical, orthoëpical, and miscellaneous matter, as to render it highly valuable as a book of reference; and to present a collection of pieces so rich, varied, perspicuous, and attractive, as to suit all classes of minds, all times, and all occasions,

Part First, in two chapters, embraces a simple, complete, and eminently practical Treatise on Elocution. The principles and rules are stated in a succinct and lucid manner, and followed by examples and exercises of sufficient number and extent to enable the student thoroughly to master each point as presented, as well as to acquire a distinct comprehension of the parts as a whole.

In Part Second, the Selections for Reading and Declamation contain what are regarded as the choicest gems of English literature. The works of many authors, ancient and modern, have been consulted, and more than a hundred standard writers, of the English language, on both sides of the Atlantic, have been laid under contribution to enable the authors to present a collection, rich in all that can inform the understanding, improve the taste, and cultivate the heart, and which, at the same time, shall furnish every variety of style and subject to exemplify the principles of Rhetorical delivery, and form a finished reader and elocutionist. These selections have been arranged in a regularly graded course, and strictly classified with regard to the nature of the subjects. Although we have not been studious of novelty, presenting only what we regarded as suitable, intrinsically excellent, and most truly indicating the mode and range of thought of the writer, it will be seen that a large proportion of this collection is composed of pieces to be found in no similar work.

Much care and labor have been devoted to the orthoëpical department. The pronunciation of all words liable to be mispronounced is indicated once in each paragraph, or at the bottom of the page where they occur. With respect to the words about the pronunciation of which orthoëpists differ, we have adopted the most recent and reliable authority.

Classical aud historical allusions, so common among the best writers, have in all cases been explained; and, if the authors have not been de

ceived, every aid has been given in the notes, that the reader may readily comprehend the meaning of the writer. This has been done in a manner more full and satisfactory than they have seen in any other collection, and in every instance at the bottom of the page where the difficulty occurs, so that the reader may not be subjected to the trouble of consulting a dictionary, or other books of reference,-& work which, in general, if done at all, is done with extreme reluctance, even by advanced pupils.

In order that the student may still more thoroughly understand what he reads, and for the convenience of that large class of readers who have not leisure to peruse voluminous memoirs of distinguished men, and yet would be unwilling to forego all knowledge of them, we have introduced concise Biographical Sketches of authors from whose works extracts have been selected, and of persons whose names occur in the Reading Exercises. These sketches, presenting a clear and distinct outline of the life, and producing a clear and distinct impression of the character, furnish an amount of useful and available information rarely surpassed by memoirs of greater extent and pretension. Lists of the names of authors, both alphabetical and chronological, have also been introduced, thus rendering this a convenient text book for students in English and American Literature.

The improvements made in the revision of this work are numerous and important. The Treatise on Elocution has been carefully elaborated, involving the introduction of phonetic exercises, a more critical orthoëpical notation, and many most apt and interesting examples for illustration. Several of these examples under each section are left unmarked, thus affording students opportunities to exercise their judgment, taste, and discrimination.

The collection of Reading Lessons has been greatly improved by judicious omissions, and the substitution of new dialogues, ballads, dramatic lyrics, and other rhetorical pieces that are more varied and inspiriting, and better adapted to elocutionary readings, both public and private. The classification of these lessons is more systematic and thorough than that ever before attempted in any corresponding work. They are divided into formal sections, in each of which only one leading subject is treated, or one important element of Elocution rendered prominent. All practical AIDS are furnished by more copious notes, new indexes, etc.

NEW YORK, June, 1866

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II. READINGS.

I. PIECES IN PROSE.

SECTION I......

1. The Months........................ Henry Ward Beecher.

SECTION II.........................

3. Never Despair.........

................

5. A Golden Coppersmith.

6. Noble Revenge.........

........... Thomas de Quincey.

7. Beauty..................

..Ralph Waldo Emerson. 94

SECTION III. ...................

............... 97

9. Maternal Affection.........

................. 100

10. The Good Wife........................Donald G. Mitchell. 101

11. Influence of Home. .................Richard Henry Dana. 103

13. The Widow and her Son-Part First.... Washington Irving. 106

14. The Widow and her Son-Part Second ......

... 110

SECTION IV........

..................................... 113

15. Biography of Jacob Hays.................... William Cox. 113

16. Peter Pounce and Parsou Adams........... Henry Fielding. 117

19. A Curtain Lecture of Mrs. Caudle.. ...... Douglas Jerrold. 126

SECTION V.......

......... 129

22. Broken Hearts—Part First.............. Washington Irving. 134

23. Broken Hearts-Part Second...........

.......... 136

27. Selected Extracts....................Henry Ward Beecher. 144

SECTION VI....................

.............. 147

29. The Barbarities of War.. .......... Thomas Chalmers. 148

33. The Siege of Leyden..... .......John Lathrop Motley. 157

SECTION VII....................

................ 164

37. Christopher Columbus. ..... ....... Washington Irving. 165

38. Return of Columbus, ..... ........ William H. Prescott. 166

39. The Revolutionary Alarm................ George Bancroft. 170

.....................

SECTION VIII........

44. Wants-Part First................. James Kirke Paulding. 180

45. Wants—Part Second.

..... 183

46. Wants-Part Third...

.................... 184

SECTION IX........

................ 198

51. Work.........

. Thomas Carlyle. 199

53. Study...............

.....Orville Dewey. 204

SECTION X..........

................... 207

54. Letters....................................D. G. Mitchell. 207

55. Select Passages in Prose...........

........... 210

I. Good use of Memory. II. Injudicious Haste in Study-

Locke. III. Studies-Bacon. IV. Books, Channing.

V. The Bible-Hall.

56. Buying Books....................... Henry Ward Beecher 214

57. Selected Extracts...................... Thomas de Quincey. 217

SECTION XI.

................... 221

59. The Poet and his Critics............... Washington Allston. 224

SECTION XII......

..................... 230

61. Ancient and Modern Writers ..... Charles Sumner 230

63. Sound and Sense.........

.... Robert Chambers. 234

64. The Power of Words....... ............ E. P. Whipple. 237

66. Parallel between Pope and Dryden.....Dr Samuel Johnson. 243

SECTION XIII .......

........... 247

67. Charge against Lord Byron................ Francis Jeffrey. 247

70. View of the Coliseum.....

.... Orville Dewey. 255

SECTION XIV.....

....................... 257

72. Scene with a Panther.............Charles Brockden Brown. 257

73. Count Fathom's Adventure-Part First......T.G. Smollett. 261

74. Count Fathom's Adventure-Part Secord. , ................ 263

76. The Rattlesnake.................. William Gilmore Simms. 270

SECTION XV...,

............ 275

77. Irving and Macaulay-Part First. ... ... Wm. M. Thackeray. 275

78. Irving and Macaulay-Part Second....................... 277

79. The Puritans.......

.... Thomas B. Macaulay 280

82. Advantages of Adversity...... ........... Edward Everett. 284

85. Liberty...

.................Orville Dewey. 291

SECTION XVI....................

........ 293

87. The Death of Hamilton..... ........ Eliphalet Nott. 294

90. Glory ............................UT. TTUTTO

Dr. Francis Wayland. 299

Y

SECTION XVII....

............................. 304

92. The Stolen Rifle......... .......... Washington Irving. 304

93. The Tomahawk submissive to Eloquence. ....... John Neal. 305

96. Marius in Prison........ ......... Thomas de Quincey. 311

SECTION XIX.....

................. 338

107. Daniel Webster- Part First............... Edward Everett. 339

108. Daniel Webster-Part Second............. ....... 341

109. From a Historical Address.................Daniel Webster. 343

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