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PAOL

Planets, The

265

Political Federation of the Empire. Sir George Baden-Powell, K.C.M.G., M.P.

,

478

Pulpit and Press

141

Religious and Missionary Intelligence. Rev. E. Barrass, D.D. 77, 156, 237, 316, 396, 480
Return of the Tide, The. John A. Freeman, B.A.

138

Rev. Dr. Thompson -

75

Rum's Arraigninent. Bishop Foster

446

Salvation Army at Work, The. Edmund K. Alden

253

Savonarola, the Martyr Monk of Florence. Editor

163

Smyrna to Constantinople. Editor

Social Work at Mildmay

436

Splendid Pause, A. Rev. W. Harrison

450
Story of Ashanti, The. Lucy Warden Brooking -

107
Through Famished Russia, In a Sledge. E. W. Cares Brooke
Time. Bishop H. W. Warren

448
Toronto and its Vicinity -

13, 93

Two Noble Lives

442

Unity of the Empire, The

474

Unscientific Science. Right Hon. A. J. Balfour

476

Walks in London. Rev. W. Harrison -

187

Why Jim Didn't Go to the Show. J. Edwin Fletcher

289

Woman in the East. Editor .

323

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تشکیل دیا

ATER. LENOXANO TILDENFPVATIONS.

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THE METHODIST MAGAZINE.

JULY, 1895.

IN THE LEVANT.

BY THE EDITOR.

BEYROUT TO SMYRNA.

was

ashore, capsized, and all its freight sank in the sea. At length it calmed sufficiently to permit going on shipboard. Our baggage was carried down on the backs of sturdy porters, through the narrow streets, to the tiny harbour for small boats.

Before embarking, Madame was made the recipient of the biggest bouquet of lovely flowers I think I ever saw, almost as large as a parasol. It was the final souvenir of our faithful dragoman, Mr. Abdallah B. Kayat, to whose thoughtful attention, during our month's journey through Pales

tine, our comfort and HAMAL, TURKISH PORTER.

pleasure were so large

ly due. The sturdy FOR two days the sea had been so strokes of our boat's crew urged rough in the open roadstead of Bey. us over the long rolling waves. We rout that no attempt could be made were heaved up, up, on the top of to embark. The great steamers, roll- a billow, and then slid down, down, ing and pitching at their moorings, down, till ship and shore were alike were very suggestive of the treat- concealed from view, and it seemed ment that their passengers would as if we would never emerge again. receive. It was with difficulty that As we approached the steamship it freight could be either discharged seemed impossible to climb the steep or received. Indeed, one of the light- ladder to her deck. Around were ers. by wbich the cargo was brought crowding boats and yelling boat

VOL. XLII. No. 1.

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EW TESOL SEM LIB

men; high above us sheered the some I counted one hundred terraces, vessel's side. As our boat rose on one above the other. In the backthe wave, at the moment it reached ground rose the snowy range of the right height we had to leap to Lebanon. The many villages on the the ladder and climb up to the deck. mountain sides glowed in the sunset How the porters got our baggage on light, and from windows miles away board I don't know.

flashed a parting gleam as if to bid In a few minutes some of our us good-bye. It was our last look party (but I shall not divulge their on Palestine — land of such boly names) had to take refuge in their memories, of such thrilling history, berths, and the rest of us could of such tragic events. There can hardly keep our feet as our ship be no farewell to scenes like these. tugged at the anchor chains and The vessel's deck was crowded danced like a cork on the waves. with about six hundred Cypriote,

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Amid the clank of machinery and Smyrniote and Greek pilgrims rerattling of chains the cargo was turning from the pilgrimage to the still being discharged, the lighters sacred places of Jerusalem and the heaving and tumbling on the waves Jordan. The deck was covered with far below. It seemed only by good their rugs and mats, on which they luck that the bales and boxes fell slept beneath the open sky. It was upon their decks instead of into the with difficulty that one could make water. At length the anchor was his way about the ship without stepweighed, the screw began to revolve, ping upon them. Many of them and the ship with its crowded living had tin cylinders about five feet freight glided from the land.

long and six inches through, conThe view shoreward was magnifi- taining palm branches plaited into cent. On all sides rose the stately graceful shapes, large religious picterraced hills which form the back- tures, and other souvenirs. Many ground of Beyrout, covered with of the pilgrims were exceedingly vines and olives to the very top. On bright and handsome people. Among

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