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VIRST we have our A, B, C's, then our a-b ab's, then

we learn to read, and after a while we speak a piece. This is what I am going to do now. When I began to go to school I was a smaller boy than I am now, and did n't know half as much. I am glad to tell you all that my teacher has been kind and attentive to me, and very patient with my faults.

Some boys don't like to study their lessons. They say, “O, never mind about our lessons, let's have a good time." I don't believe in that. My idea is to work while you

do work, and when it is time to play, why, then play. I see boys who laugh at me for saying this. That don't worry me. If I did like some of them, I should not know anything about my lessons, and should probably get into trouble about it as often as they do. However, let them look out for themselves, and we shall see how they will get along when it comes their turn to speak.

I hope next time to do better, but if I have said very little, I have tried to say it well. If I am entitled to your kind approbation I shall feel grateful for it. You must remember I am a very small boy, and have other things to think of besides making a speech. Should I ever become a member of Congress, you may hear from

me again.

Ex. 2.

- OUR DUTIES AS AMERICANS.

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HAT vast motives press upon us for lofty efforts !

What brilliant prospects invite our enthusiasm ! What solemn warnings at once demand our vigilance and moderate our confidence !

We stand the latest, and if we fail probably the last, experiment of self-government by the people. We have begun it under circumstances of the grandest and most encouraging nature. We are as a nation in the vigor of youth. Our growth has never been checked by the oppression of tyranny. Our constitutions have never been weakened by the vices or luxuries of the Old World. Such as we are, we have been from the beginning, - simple, hardy, intelligent, accustomed to self-government and self-respect.

The Atlantic rolls between us and any formidable foe. Within our own territory we have the choice of many products, and many means of independence. ernment is mild. The press is free. Religion is free. Knowledge reaches, or may reach, every home. What fairer prospect of success could be presented ? What means more adequate to accomplish the sublime end ? What more is necessary than for the people to preserve what they themselves have created ? Can it be that America can betray herself? -- that she is to be added to the catalogue of republics the inscription of whose ruin is, “They were, but are not.” Forbid it, my countrymen! Forbid it, Heaven!

The gove Ex. 3.

THE CAPTAIN'S STORY. — Dickens.

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COW, there is a story, once told me by a friend of

mine, which seems to my mind to have a certain application. My friend was an American sea-captain, and therefore it is quite unnecessary to say his story was quite true. He was captain and part owner of a large American merchant liner. On a certain voyage out, in exquisite summer weather, he had for cabin passengers one beautiful young lady and ten more or less beautiful young gentlemen. Light winds or dead calms prevailing, the voyage was slow. They had made half their distance when the ten young gentlemen were all madly in love with the beautiful young lady. They had all proposed to her, and bloodshed among the rivals seemed imminent, pending the young lady's decision. In this extremity the beautiful young lady confided in my friend the captain, who gave her discreet advice.

He said, “If your affections are disengaged, take that one of the young men whom you like the best, and settle the question.” To this the beautiful young lady made reply, “I can't do that, because I like them all equally well.” My friend, who was a man of resource, hit upon this ingenious expedient; said he, “ To-morrow morning, when lunch is announced, do you plunge boldly overboard, head foremost. I will be alongside in a boat to rescue you, and take the one of the ten who rushes to your rescue, and then you can afterwards have him.” The beautiful young lady highly approved, and did accordingly. But, after she plunged in, nine out of the ten more or less beautiful young gentlemen plunged in after her; and the tenth remained and shed tears, looking over the side of the vessel. They were all picked up and restored, dripping, to the deck. The beautiful young lady, upon seeing them, said, “What

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