Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub

XXXVIII.

XXXIX.

XL.

His golden winges; his dreadfull hideous hedd,
Clole couched on the bever, seemd to throw Whenas this knight nigh to the lady drew,
From faning mouth bright sparckles fiery redd, With lovely court he gan her entertaine ;
Thar fuddeine horrour to faint hartes did show; But when he heard her aunswers loth, he knew
And scaly tayle was stretchtadowne his back fulllow. Some secret sorrow did her heart distraine;
XXXII.

Which to allay, and calme her storining paine, L'yan the top of all his loftie crest

Faire-feeling words he wisely gán display, A bunch of heares discolourd diverfly,

And for her humour fitting purpose faine, Vi lyrincled pearle and gold full richly dreft, To tempt the cause it selfe for to bewray,

[fay; Du kake, and seemd to daunce for iollity; Wherewith ennious, these bleeding words the gan to Like to an almond tree ymounted hye On top of greene Selinis all alone,

“ What worlds delight, or ioy of living speach, With bloloms brave bedecked daintily,

“ Can hart, fo plungd in sea of sorrowes deep, bole tender locks do tremble every one

“ And heaped with so huge misfortunes, reach? At crerie little breath that under heaven is blowne. • The carcfull cold beginneth for to creep, XXVII.

“ And in my hart his yron arrow steep, His garlike shield all closely cover'd was, “ Scone as I thinke upon my bitter bale. No might of mortall eye be ever seene ;

“ Such helplesse harmes yts better hidden keep, Not made of steele, nor of enduring bras,

“ Then rip up grie!e where it may not availe ; (Sach earthly meitals toon consumed beene) “ My las left comfort is my woes to weepe and Put all of diamond perfect pure and clcene

" waile." It framed was, one maffy entire mould, Howen out of adamant rocke with engines kecne, “ Ah! lady deare," quoth then the gentle knight, Tsat point of speare it never percen could, “ Well may I ween your griofe is wondro us greut; Nc dict of direfull sword divide the substance would. “ For wondrous great gricfe groneth in my spright, XXXIV.

“ Whiles thus I hearc you of your sorrowes treat. The same to wight he never wont disclose, “ But, woefull lady! let me you intrete But whenas tronfters huge he would disinay, “ For to unfold the anguish of your hart : 0: dauzt unequall armies of his foes,

“ Mishaps are maitred by advice discrete, O when the flying heavens he would affray : And counsell niitigates the greateft finart: Irbexcceling 'none his gliring ray,

“ Found never help who never would his hurts 11. Phobus' golden face it did attaint,

“ impart." A when a cloud his beames doth over-lay; aac Alver Cynthia wexed pale and faynt,

“O but," quoth the,

great griefe will not be As when herfice is staynd with magicke art's conXXXV.

[ftraint. “ And can more easily be thought then said." Ho magicke arts hereof had any might,

“ Right fo,” quoth he; “ but he chat never would, Nar bloody wordes of bold enchaunters call, “ Could never : will to might gives greatest aid." But all that was not such as fecnd in fight, “ But griefe," quoth the, “ does greater grow Before that shield did fade, and suddein fall ;

difplaid, And when him lift the raskall routes appall, If shen it find not helpe, and breeds delpaire." Men into ftones therewith he could trac{mew, “ Despaire breeds not," quoth he," where faith is Ad Hoces to dust, and duft to nought at all;

“ staid.” daduben kiin lit the prouder loukes subdew, “ No faith fo fatt," quoth the, ” but flesh does Hinculd them gazing blind, or turne to other hew.

paire."

“ Flesh nay empaire," quoth he,“ but season can Ne ke it seeme that credence this exceedes ;

гераіrе.”

."
For be that made the lame was knowne right well
To have done much more admirable deedes : His goodly reason and well-guided (peach
It Merlin was, which whylone did excell

So deepe did settle in her gracious thought, Allviog wightes in might of magicke spell; That her persuaded to disclose the brcach Ribjait id, and sword, and armour, all he wrought Which Love and Fortune in her hart had wrought; ie this young prince, when first to armes he fell; And said, “ Faire Sir, I hope good hap hath brought 52 when he dyde, the facry Queene ir brought “ You to inquere the secrets of my griefe ; 1c Facrie Lond, where yet it may be feen if fought. “ Or that your wisdome will direct my thought;

" Or that your prowelle can me yield reliefe; A reale youth, his dearly loved squire,

“ Then hcare the story lad, which I Mall tell you to speare si heben wood behind him bare,

“ bricfe. " ble tarmful head, thrise heated in the fire, Het riven man; a brest with pikchead square ; “ The forlorne maider, whom your eics have seene Adly perfon, and could menage faire

“ The laughing stock of Fortune's mockeries, stubborn Iced with curbed cancn bitt, “ Am thonely daughter of a king and queene, wbounder lim did trample as the aire,

" Whole parents dcare (whiles equal destinies Ånd decit that any on his backe Should fitt, “ Did roine about, and their feliçitics 163 proa ruwels into frothy fonie he bitt,

Dij

XLI.

« tould,

XXXVI.

XLII.

[ocr errors]

XXXVII.

XLIII.

XIX.

XXVI.

XX.

XXVII.

XXI.

XXVIII.

And underneath his filthy feet did crcad
The sacred thinges, and hely haftes fortaught. “ Tempestuous Fortune hath spent all her fpight,
Upon this dreadful beaft, with sevenfold head, “ And thrilling Sorrow throwne his utmost dari :
He fet the falle Duesla, for more aw and dread. Thy fad tong cannot tell more heavy light

“ Then that I feele and harbour in min hart : The wofull dwarfe, which saw his maister's fall, “ Who bath endur'd the whole can bcare cch part. (Whiles he had keeping of his grafing íteed) “ jf death it be, it is not the first wound And valiant knight become a caytive thrall, “ That launched hath my brest with bleeding smart. When all was past, took up his forlorne weed; “ Legin, and end the bitter baleful stound; His mightie armour, milling mot at need; “ If life then that I feare, more favour I have found." His silver shield, now ille nailterhelle; His poynant speare, that many made to bleed; Then gan the dwarfe the whole discourse declare; (The rueful noniments of heavineffe)

The subtile craines of Archimago old, And with them all departes, to tell his great disresse. The wanton loves of false Fidella fayre,

Bought with the blood of vanqnicht paynima bold; He had not travaild long, when on the way The wretched payre transformed to treen mould; He wofull lady, wofull Una, met

The house of Pryde, and perilles round about ; Fast flying from the paynim's greedy pray, The combat which he with Sansioy did hould ; Whilest Satyrane him from pursuit did let; 'The lucklelle conflict with the gyaunt stout, Who when her eyes she on the dwarf had set, Wherein captiv’d, of life or death he stood in doubt. And saw the lignes that deadly tydinges spake, She fell to ground for forrowful regret,

She heard with patience all unto the end, And lively breath her fad breast did forsake; And firove to maifter sorrowfull assay, Yet might her piteous hart be seen to pant and quake. Which greater grew the more she did contend,

And almost rent her tender hart in tway,
The messenger of so unhappie newes,

And love fresh coles unto her fire did lay;
Woulo faine have dyde ; dead was his hart withia; For greater love, the greater is the loffe.
Yet outwardly fome little comfort Thewes ; Was never lady loved dearer day,
At last, recovering hart, he does begin

Then she did love the Knight of the Red-crose,
To rub her temples, and to chauf her chin, For whose deare fake so many troubles her did cofie.
And everie tender part docs tosse and turn:
So hardly he the fliced life does win

At lat when fervent sorrow flaked was,
Unto her native prison to retourne ; (mourne; She up arose, resolving him to find
Then gins her grieved ghost thus to lameut and Alive or dead; and forward forth doth pas,

All as th: dwarse the way to her affynd : “ Ye dreary instruments of doleful fight,

And evermore, in constant carefull mind, “ That doe this deadly spectacle behoid,

She fedd her wound with fresh renewed bale. “ Why doe ye lenger feed on loathed light, Long ioft with stormes, and bet with bitter wind, " Or biking find to gaze on earthly mould, High over hills, and lowe adowne the dale, (vak. “ Sith cruell Fares the careful threds unfold, She wandred many a wood, and measurd many a “ The which my life and love together tyde ? fi Now let the stony dart of fencelerle cold

At lal the chaunced by good hap to meet “ Perce to my hart, and pas through everie fyde, A goodly knight, faire marching by the way, " And let eternal night lo lad fight fro niy hyde. Together with his lquyre, arayed mect :

His glitterand armour shined far away, “ O lightsome day (the lanipe of higheft love, Like glauncing light of Phebus' brightest ray; “ First made by him menswandring wayes toguyde, From top to toc no place appeared bare, " When darknesle he in deepest dongeon drove) That deadly dint of steele endanger may: « Henceforth thy hated face for ever hyde, Athwart his breit a bauldrick brave he warc, And shut up heaven's windowes Phyning wyde; That find, like twinkling Nars, with stones most “ For earthly light can nought but forrow breed,

[pretious rare : “ And late repentance, which thall long abyde. And in the midst thereof one pretious stone “ Mine eyes no more on vanitie shall feed, (meed. Of wondrous worth, and eke of wondrous mights, “ But feeled up with death thall have their deadly Shape like a ladies head, exceeding thone,

Like Hesperus emongst the leffer lights, Then downc again the fell unto the ground, And Itrove for to amaze the weaker fights; But he her quickly reared up againe :

Thereby his mortall blade full comely hong Thrise did she finke adowne in deadly swownd, In yvory sheath, yourv'd with curious flights, And thrise he her reviv'd with bufie paine. Whose hil:s were burnisht gold, and handle trong At laft, when Life recover'd had the rainc, Of mother-perle, and buckled with a golden tong. And over-wrestled his frong enimy, With foltring tong, and trenbling everie vaine, His haughtie helmet, horrid all with gold, * Teil 011," quoth 1tre, “ the woful tragedy, Both glorious brightnesse and great terrour breddi 6: The which thefc rcliques iad present unto mize For all the creft a dragon did enfold eye.

With grecdie pawes; and over all did fpredd

[ocr errors]

XXIX.

XXIII.

XXIV.

XXXVIII.

XXIII.

XXXIX.

XXXIV.

)

His golden winges ; his dreadfull hideous hedd,
Close couched on the bever, seemd to throw Whenas this knight nigh to the lady drew,
From flaming mouth bright sparckles fiery redd, With lovely court he gan her entertaine ;
Tha: suddeine horrour to faint hartes did show; But when he hear'd her aunswers loth, he knew
And scaly tayle was stretchtadowne his back fulllow. Some secret sorrow did her heart distraine;

Which to allay, and calme her storming paine, Upon the top of all his loftie crest

Faire-feeling words he wisely gan display, A bounch of heares discolourd diversly,

And for her humour fitting purpose faine, With princled pearle and gold full richly dreft, To tempt the cause it selfe for to bewray,

(fay; Did hake, and seemd to daunce for iollity; Wherewith ennioud, these bleeding words the gan to Like to an alnıond tree y.mounted hye On top of greene Selinis all alone,

“ What worlds delight, or ioy of living speach, With blossoms brave bedecked daintily,

“ Can hart, so plungd in sea of forrowes deep, Whole tender locks do tremble every one

“ And heaped with fo huge misfortunes, reach? At eserie little breath that under heaven is blowne. “ The carcfull cold beginneth for to creep, XXVIII.

“ And in my hart his yron arrow steep, His warlike shield all closely cover'd was,

Scone as I thinke upon my bitter bale. No might of mortall eye be ever seene ;

“ Such helplesse harmes yts better hidden keep, Nor made of Iteele, nor of enduring bras,

“ Then rip up grie!e where it may not availe ; (Such carthly mettals foon consumed bcene) My last left comfort is my woes to weepe and But all of diamond perfect pure and cleene

66 waile." It framed was, one maffy entire mould,

XL, Hewen out of adamant rocke with engines keene, “ Ah! lady deare," quoth then the gentle knight, That point of speare it never percen could, “Well may I ween your grisfe is wondrous great; Ne dint of direfull fword divide the subitance would. “ For wondrous great griefe groneth in my spright,

“ Whiles (hus I hearc you of your sorrowes treat. The same to wight he never wont disclose, “ But, woefull lady! let me you intrete But whenas monfters huge he would difınay, “ For to unfold the anguifh of your hart : Or daurt unequall armies of his foes,

Milhaps are maistred by advice discreto, Or when ihe flying heavens he would affray: “And counsell niitigates the greateft finart: Esfon excceling 'none his glittring ray,

“ Found never help who never would his hurts T!: Phobus' golden face it did attaint,

“ impart." As when a cloud his beames doth over-lay; and Lilver Cynthia wexed pale and faynt,

“O but," quoth the, great griefe will not be As when her face is ftaynd with magickc art's con

“ tould,

[Itraint. “ And can more casily be thought then faid." No magicke arts hereof had any might,

Right so," quoth he; " but he that never would, Nor bloody wordes of bold enchaunters call, “ Could never : will to might gives greatest aid." But all that was not such as fecmd in fight, “ But griefe," quoth she,

“ does greater grow Before that shield did fade, and suddein fall;

difplaid, And when him lift the raskall routes appall, If ihen it find not helpe, and breeds do paire.” Men into stones therewith he could tran[mew, “ Despaire breeds not," quoth he,“where faith is And stones to cuft, and duft to nought at all;

4 staid." And when hiin lit the prouder loukes subdew, “ No faith fo fa&t," quoth the, “ but feth docs Huwould them gazing blind, or turne to other hew. * paire."

“ Fleh nay empaire” quoth he,“ bụt seafo cạn Ne let it seeme that credence this exceedes;

repairc."
For he that made the fame was knowne right well
To have done much more admirable deedes : His goodly reason and well-guided (peach
It Merlin was, which whylone did excell

So deepe did settle in her gracious thought,
Al living wightes in might of magicke spell ; That her perfuaded to disclose the brcach
Buch thicid, and sword, and armour, all he wrought Which Love and Fortune in her hart had wrought;
Fer this young prince, when first to armes he fell; And said," Faire Sir, I hope good hap hath brought
Bat when he dyde, the Facry Queenc ir bronght “ You to inquere the secrets of my griefe;
To Faerie Lund, where yet it may be seen is sought. " Or that your wisdome will direct my thought;

“ Or that your prowelle can me yield reliefe; A zenle youth, his dearly loved squire,

" Then heure the story fad, which I hall tell you liis ípeare oi beben wood behind hin bare,

“ briefe. Whole tarmful head, thrise heated in the fire, Had riven many a brest with pikehead square ; “ The forlorne maider, whom your cics have seene A godly perfun, and could menage faire

“ The laughing stock of Fortune's mockeries, Huis ftubborn stced with curbed canen bitt, “ Am th'cnely daughter of a king and queene, Wtounder him did trample as the aire,

“ Whose parents deare ( whiles equal deftinics And chaust that any on his backe Should Gitt, “ Did reine about, and thcir folicitics ile pron rcwels into frothy fome he bitt.

XLI.

XXXV.

(

XXXVI.

XLII.

XXXVII.

XLIII.

Dij

XLIV.

“ you tosse ?

XLIX.

[ocr errors]

XLV.

L.

The favourable heavens did not envy)

“ Which have endured many a dreadfull stowre, Did spred their rule through all the territories “ Can speake his prowesse, that did earst you beare, “ Which Phison and Euphrates floweth by, “ And well could rule; now he hath left you heare “ And Gehon's golden waves doe wash continually: “To be the record of his ruefull losse,

“ And of my doleful disaventurous deare. « Till that their cruell cursed enemy,

“ O heavie record of the good Red-crosse, “ An huge great dragon, horrible in sight; “ Where have yee left your lord, that could so well “ Bred in the loathly lakes of Tartary, “ With murdrous ravine and devouring might « Their kingdome spoild, and couptrey wasted “ Well hoped I, and faire beginnings bad, “ quight :

“ That he my captive languor should redeeme, « Themse.ves, for seare into his iawes to fall, • Till all unweeting, an enchaunter bad “ He forst to castle Atrong to take their Alight, “ His sence abusd, and made him to misdecine “ Where last embard in mighty brazen wall, · My loyalty, not such as it did seeme; “ He has them now fowr years befiegd to make “ That rather death desire then such despight. “ them thrall

“ Be iudge, ye Heavens: that all things right

“ esteeme, " Full many knights, adventurous and stout, “ How I him lov'd, and love with all my might : “ Have enterprizd that monster to subdew : “ So thought I cke of him, and think I thought “ From every coast, that heaven walks about,

aright. “ Have thither conie the noble martial crew, " That famous harde atchievements still pursew; “ Thenceforth me desolate he quite forsooke, “ Yet never any could that girlond win,

“ To wander where wilde Fortune would me lead, “ But all ftill fronke, and still he greater grew : “ And other bywaies he himselfe betooke, “ All they for want of faith, or guilt of sin, “ Where never foote of living wight did tread, “ The piteous pray of his fiers cruelty have bin. “ That brought not backe the balefull body dead,

“ In which him củaunced false Duessa meete, " At last, yled with far reported praise,

" Mine onely foe, mine onely deadly dread, “ Which flying Fame throughout the world had “ Who with her witchcraft and misseeming sweete, “ spred

Inveigled him to follow her defires uomeete, “Of doughty knights, whom Faery Land did raise, “ That noble order hight of Maidenhed,

At last, by subtile Neights she him betraid « Forthwith to court of Gloriane I sped,

Unto his foe, a gyaunt huge and tall, « (Of Gloriane, great queene of glory bright!) “ Who him disarmed, dissolute, dismayed, “ Whose kingdomes seat Cleopolis is Red, “ Unwares surprised, and with mighty mall “ There to obtaine some such redoubted knight, “ The monster mercilesse him made to fall, “ That parents deare from tyrants powre deliver “ Whose fall did never foe before bchold; “ might.

“ And now in darkesome dungeon, wretched thrall,

“ Remedilefle for aie he doth hin hold. "Yt was my chaunce (my chaunce was faire and “ This is my cause of griefe, more great then may

u be told." “ There for to find a fresh uuproved knight, “ Whose manly hands imbrewd in guilty blood Ere she had ended all she gan to faint ; “ Had never beene, ne ever by his might

But hc her comforted, and faire bespake, * Had throwne to ground the unregarded right; Certes, madamę, ye have great cause of plaint, " Yet of his prowelle proofe he fince hath made “ That stoutest hart, I weene, could cause to quake; “ (I witnes am) in many a cruell fight :

“ But be of cheare, and comfort to you take, “ 'The groning ghosts of many one dismaide “ For till I have acquit your captive knight, " Have felt the bitter dint of his avenging blade. “ Assure your selfe I will you not forsake." XLVIII.

His chearefull words reviv'd her chearelesse spright; 6 And ye, the forlorne reliques of his powre, So forth they went, the dwarfe them guiding ever His biting (word, and his devouring speare,

right.

XLVI.

LI.

XLVII.

is good)

LIL

[ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

brast.

11.

i. Ay me! how many perils doe enfold

Was never wight that heard that fhrilling found, The righteous man, to make him daily fall : But trembling feare did feel in every vaine : Were not that heavenly grace doth him uphold, Three miles it might be ealý heard arownd, and stedfait cruth acquite him out of all : And ecchoes three aunswer'd it felfe againe : Har love is firme, her care continuall,

No faulse enchauptment nor deceiptfull craine So oft as he through his own foolish pride Might once abide the terror of that blast, Or weaknes, is to Sinfull bands made thrall : But prefently was void and wholly vaine : Els hould chis Red-crosse knight in bands have No gate so Itrong, no locke so firme and fast, dyde,

But with that piercing noise flew open quite, or For whose deliverance she this prince doth thether guyde.

The same before the geaunt's gate he blew, They sadly traveild thus, untill they came That all the castle quaked from the grownd, Nigh to a castie builded strong and hye :

And every dôre of free-will open flew. Tico cryde the dwarse,“ Lo yonder is the fame, The gyaunt selfe dismaied with that found, " in which my lord my liege doth lucklesse ly, Where he with his Duesla dalliaunce fownd, * Thrall to that gyaunt's hatefull tyranny, In haft came rushing forth from inner bowre, « Therefore, deare Sir, your mightie powres assay." With ftaring countenance fterne, as one aftownd, The poble knight alighted by and by

And flaggering steps, to weet what suddein stowte From loftie fleed, and badd the lady stay,

Had wrought that horror ftrange, and dar'd his To see what end of fight Mould him befall that

dreaded powre. day.

Ånd after him the proud Duesa tame, So with his squire, th' admirer of his might, High mounted on her many-headed beast, He marched forth towards that castle wall, And every head with fyrie tongue did flame, Whose gates he fownd fast shuti, ne living wight And every head was crowned on his creelt, To warde che fame, por answere commers call; And bloody mouthed with late cruell feast : Then tooke that squire an horre of bugle small, That when the knight beheld, his mightie thild Which hong adowne his fide in twisted gold, Upon his manly arme he foonc addrest, And taffelles gay: wyde wonders over all And at him fierfly flew, with corage fild, Of that same hornes great vertües werch told, And eger greedinello through every member thrild, Which had approved bene in uits nianifold.

Diij

VI.

111.

« ПредишнаНапред »