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to let him remain in the temple all night, and when The story, of course, is changed, that the author the hour arrives, and the temple gates are flung may find fields wherein to exercise the great gifts of wide, throws his money in her lap before Ammarac | his mind, but the tragic ending remains the same. can reach her. Bel-shar-uzzur appears just as Tam

Language, imagination, voluptuousness, these mac seizes Alca to bear her to the chamber where

glow and burn in every scene, in every song. The his wish can be consummated, and she appeals to essence of all of these poems, is pagan. The show, the king for protection. At first he carries her off, the sound, the utter lavishness of life, the glitter of and falls in love with her, and yet he, the king,

| gold and gems, the sensual thought, belong to a Dared not to press her beauty to his lips."

people and a period whose religion is ruled by for the priests demand that she shall fulfill her hour things carnal. That much of the matter is abhorwith Tammac, and Bel-shar-uzzur resigns her to rent to the prevailing ideas of the present day, does him for that time. At its close, she is led back to not make the pictures less true to the life they the king, and as she reaches him, an archer

delineate. “Threw Tammac's severed head at Alca's feet."

The thought that rules after reading the two books Alca becomes the king's favorite, and Ammarac, of Saltus that form the subject of this article is, do in his sorrow and madness, fies to the Medes and these poems add to the literary wealth of the world? Persians, who, under Cyrus, have come up to be Great they certainly are, strong in language, powersiege the city. Then comes the king's feast, and ful in imagination, facile in thought, wonderful in Then suddenly, from nothing, came a Hand

erudition, original in conception-but does literaAnd wrote strange words of fire upon the wall.

ture and mankind benefit by them? Would not Daniel's interpretation follows, and is quickly suc the genius that could write such things, have, if led ceeded by Ammarac's betrayal of the city.

in a different direction, left the earth a song that Ammarac kills the king, and demands Alca's would ring on through all coming time, a glory and love, to be met with the bitter words,

an inspiration? These are questions that it is right “Approach me not!

to ask, for the future gathers from the present, the Thou hast betrayed thy country and thy king,

lessons that tend to a better use of the powers that And thou to me art fouler than a Jew!

belong to man.
My love, my passion, yea my soul itself,
Was centered in my monarch thou hast slain."

That Saltus was a poet, that he possessed the As she ceased speaking, Alca snatched the king's

poetic thought, the poetic power, the poetic genius,

is evident. He has left work that could only emanlance, And fell upon it as a warrior would,

ate from these things. This being so, there must While the red blood choked up her rosy mouth,

some good come from his poems, but the intense While the sweet eyes grew still, and she was dead."

cynicism, the avid grasping of themes that teem Ammarac groped to the palace roof,

with horror, the pessimism that revels in dark "And leapt into the darkness far below,

thoughts of the past, the present and the future, are Staining an obelisk with guilty blood!

not the best gifts that genius can leave to the comAnd Babylon was leveled to the dust."

ing years. “Lot's Wife," a poem filling nearly fifty printed The time has not yet come, when a full judgment pages, recounts for Sodom, what “Bel-shar-uzzur"

on the life, the work, and the genius of Francis Saldoes for Babylon. The sins, the voluptuousness, tus can be given. An acquaintance with his perthe beauty of this,

formance in all the varied branches that this shows, “ The monumental miracle and grace

will be necessary, to make this just and complete. Of all the haughty cities of the plain,"

Even his poetic accomplishment can only be judged is told in language that fits the time, the surround inadequately, for other volumes may change the ings, the seething life of a place, of which the poet i tone of a criticism embracing the complete range of sings,

his poetic work. Summing up the result of this, "The night had come; the city was aflame

| however, by his work as now known, it must be With lust, and music, and continual song."

conceded that his poetry, in its extent, in its glory But the wrath of a stronger God than any her

of language, in its rendering of local life and color, people bowed down to, was awakened, and Sodom

in its imagination, in its melodic properties, and fell, for

erudition, is wonderful. He was à poet, strong in “Down through the shields of mist His bolts were driven,"

all of the essentials that make leaders in literature, and Lot and his children were all who lived to tell action and thought, and, despite the fact that he of that fair place, so lately full of mirth, and melody failed to read man and nature aright in all cases, a and sensuous madness.

I great poet.

T. S. C.

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C. O. PERRIN, President of the College of Commerce of Buffalo, N. Y., whose portrait appears on the preceding page, is not a poet, but has achieved distinction in his great field of labor as President of the largest and most successful Commercial College and Shorthand Institute in the United States. Although comparatively a young man, the magnitude of his undertakings and the means already attained is far beyond his years if we are to judge by the average successful man as our guide. A little more than three years ago Prof. Perrin laid the foundation for the College of Commerce, for which he saw there was much need. From the humble beginning his school has so rapidly increased in numbers that it has been necessary to add one story after another until the present time he occupies three floors of the elegant Jewett Block at 327 Washington Street, utilizing for school rooms eighteen thousand square feet of floor space, and during the month of February had an enrollment of nine hundred and four students. This is a remarkable showing, to say the least, and when we call the attention of our readers to this great school for the practical training and education of the young men and women who are to occupy positions of trust and responsibility, we do so with honest pride, believing our readers will be interested in knowing such a school is located in the Queen City of the Lakes.

Space will not admit of going into details pertaining to the management and causes resulting in such phenomenal and unprecedented success, but we will take the opportunity of doing so at another time. A few brief points, however, will give a clew to these facts in question. The Faculty is composed of gentlemen and ladies all of whom are specialists in their several departments of work; they have been wisely selected because of their special fitness, experience and moral worth, in teaching, guiding and directing these young men and women in the important work before them.

Students of all ages, from fifteen to fifty years, are admitted, and during the summer months special inducements are held out to teachers in the Commercial or Bookkeeping, Shorthand and Typewriting, English, Art, Drawing, and Music Departments.

The Correspondence Course in Shorthand, as conducted by Prof. Perrin, is novel and very interesting. He has three hundred students who are successfully mastering the art of the New Rapid system of Shorthand through the medium of the mails. Among this large class are Lawyers, Doctors, Editors, Teachers, School Principals, Students in public and private schools, Bookkeepers, and many others who are preparing for the practical relations of life. The offices and college rooms are spacious and elegantly furnished, the walls and ceilings throughout the entire building are frescoed a warm beautiful tint, and the desks are of modern construction and adapted for the special department for which they were designed. In his private office the President is surrounded with about ten stenographers, whose nimble fingers are recording answers to the large number of inquiries made daily concerning this school; also the correction of lessons of correspondents with suggestions for a more thorough mastery of this beautiful system of Shorthand. A visit to his school will repay any one who is interested in educational matters.

THE

MAGAZINE OF POETRY

A QUARTERLY REVIEW

ILLUSTRATED

JULY 1891

CHARLES WELLS MOULTON

BUFFALO NY

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THE MAGAZINE OF POETRY
THE MAGAZINE

CONTENTS FOR JULY, 1891.
WILLIAM DAVIS GALLAGHER . .

. Frontispiece Portrait by Roche, Louisville, Ky, SARAH M. B. PIATT

Nettie Leila Michel.

279 Portrait by Guy & Co., Cork, Ireland. S. WEIR MITCHELL.

Nettie L. Champion . JOHN JAMES PIATT

Benjamin S. Parker

291 Portrait by Guy & Co., Cork, Ireland. KATE TUCKER GOODE.

James A. Duncan .

297 Portrait by Perkins,

Baltimore, Md. ANNIE E. HUBBART BARKER

· James G. Clark

299 ZADEL BARNES GUSTAFSON

L. H. D.

303 Portrait by Walery, London, England. THERON BROWN

Hezekiah Butterworth

308 BERTHA MAY IVORY

Eugene Geary

313 Portrait by Scholten, St. Louis, Mo. RICHARD K. MUNKITTRICK.

Daniel Connolly DEXTER CARLETON WASHBURN

Charles T. Walter CHRISTOPHER P. FLANDERS

· Justin S. Barrows

320 SARA LOUISA OBERHOLTZER.

M. Sheeleigh.

323 With portrait. SARAH J. D. STEVENS

George C. Chase . MARION MANVILLE.

Margaret H. Lawless

329 Portrait by Pryor, La Crosse, Wis. SARAH STOKES WALTON

Helen Struthers

332 Portrait by Tichenor, Burlington, N. J. WILLIAM DAVIS GALLAGHER

Alfred W. Harris. DONALD FITZ-RANDOLPH M'GREGOR

Thomas Mooney

341 Portrait by Wendel, New York. AUGUSTA WEBSTER

F. A. H. Eyles

343 DENNIS B. COLLINS

· James Fitz Simmons

347 Portrait by Lloyd, Troy, N. Y. CALEB D. BRADLEE

: F. W. Ricord

349 LAURA A. S. NOURSE

A. C. Barney

353 Portrait by Atkinson, Moline, Illinois. BENJAMIN F. LEGGETT

Bailey Aldrich Brown

355 JOHN TALMAN

Carrie Lee Steele ..

· 359 With portrait. JOHN M. HARPER.

Helen Manning .

361 JOHN W. BARNES

L. Weber.

365 Portrait by Purcell, Macon, Mo. LOTTIE CAMERON EFNOR

A. A. McBryde
Sketch by Bradley, Buffalo, N. Y,
EDWARD AUGUSTUS JENKS .

Rossiter Johnson
With portrait.
JAMES RUSSELL LOWELL

· Jeannette Ward.

373 SINGLE POEMS.

377 PERSONAL POEMS. A COLLECTION OF SONNETS .

385 A COLLECTION OF RONDEAUS

387 QUOTATIONS ON MUSIC .

392 CURRENT POEMS

394 BIBLIOGRAPHY

400 NOTES

401 THE EDITOR'S TABLE

402

336

366

368

TERMS.--$2.00 a year in advance; 50 cents a number. Foreign, nine shillings. Booksellers and Postmasters receive subscriptions. Subscribers may remit by post-office or express money orders, draft on New York, or registered letters. Money in letters is at sender's risk. Terms to clubs and canvassers on application. Magazines will be sent to subscribers until ordered discontinued. Back numbers exchanged, if in good condition, for corresponding bound volumes in ball morocco, elegant, gilt, gilt top, for $1.00. subscribers paying charges both ways. Postage on bound volume, 35 cents. All numbers sent for binding should be marked with owner's name. We cannot bind or exchange copies the es of which have been trimme by machine. Address all communications to CHARLES WELLS MOULTON, Publisher,

Buffalo, N. Copyright, 1891, by Charles Wells Moulton. Entered at Buffalo Post-Office as Second-Class Mail Matter.

Y.

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