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820, Matlock, 680, Stooy Middleton 630, Bakewell 600, Brough near Hope, Cromford, and Stoke.- Sulphureous, at Agnes and Mudge meadows, Bakewell; Bradwell, Brassington, Cowley near Dronfield, Kedleston, Koive ton, Millington Green pear Kirk Ireton, Shottle in Duffield, Shuttlewood near Bolso ver, West Hallam, Whittington, and near Wirksworth.—Chalsbeate, most celebrated, at Asbover, Birley in Eckington, Bradley, Buxton, Chesterfield, two at Duffield, Eccleston in Youlgrave, Heage, Hope, near Kedleston, Matlock, Morley park, Quarodov, Shottle, Stanley, Tibshelf, and Whittington.-Saline, at Donisthorpe, and between Hope and Bradwell.-Ebbing and flowing, at Barmoor, and Tideswell.–At Overton, seat of Sir Joseph Banks, are two gooseberry trees, of the smooth red or War. rington sort, remarkably good bearers, the extreme length of one, measured in 1816, was 54 feet 7 inches ; the other, which was planted in 1794, measured in 1808, 41 feet 5 inches.—At Bretby, the Earl of Chesterfield's, is a cedar of Lebanon, 13 feet 9 inches in circumference, planted in Feb. 1676-7, and is probably the oldest tree of its kind in this kingdom. The Enfield cedar was planted nearly at the same time; those in the Physic

garden at Chelsea, in 1683. Public Edifices. Ashborueschoolfounded 1585.—Burton upon Trent bridge will

be noticed in the Compendium of Staffordshire. --Buxton baths; crescent built by the late Duke of Devonshire in 1785 and 1786 ; Stables, a circular area of 60 yards internal diameter, with coach houses for 60 carriages.-Cavendish bridge, near Wilne, built by the Cavendish family about 1750.-- Chesterfield town hall, erected 1790; architect, Carr.—Derby Alms-house, built by Elizabeth Countess of Shrewsbury, 1599: County hall erected in 1659 : All Saints church, architect Gibbs, finished 1725 : Guildhall 1731: County gaol 1756: Theatre 1773: Assembly rooms 1774; Ordnance depôt, Wyatt architect, completed 1805 : Infirmary, William Strutt, esq. architect, cost

£.30,000 opened 1810: Schools.--Etwall Hospital.-Harrington bridge at Sawley, begun 1786, fipished 1790.–Measham town-ball.-- Ravenstone hospital, founded by Rebecca Wilkinson 1712.-Repton school.-Swarkston bridge, span over the river 138 yards, but its whole length over the low grounds 1304 yards.

Seats... Alfreton, Rev. H. C. Morewood... Aldercar, Rev. John Smith..

Highfield, V. H. Eyre, esq. . Allestrey, J. C. Girardot, esq.

Hilcote hall, John Wilkinson, esq. Aston, Rev. Charles Holden.

Holme hall, Robert Birch,.esq. Bank-hall, Samuel Frith, esq.

Holt house, George Mower, esq. Barlborough, C. H. Rodes, esq.

Hopwell, Thomas Pares, esq. Barrow, John Beaumont, esq.

Ingleby, R. C. Greaves, esq. Barton Blount, Francis Bradshaw, esq. Langley park, Godfrey Meynell, esq. Beauchief Abbey, P. P. Burnell, esq. Leam, M. M. Middleton, esq. Bolsover, Duke of Portland.

Little Longsdon, James Longsdon, esq. Bradley, Godfrey Meynell, esq.

Little Over, Bache Heathcote, esq. Breadsall priory, Mrs. Darwin.

Mearsbrook, Samuel Shore, esq. Bridge-end, J. B. Strutt, esq.

Measham-field, Edward Abney, esq. Castle field, John Burrow, esq.

Mellor, Samuel Oldknow, esą. Catton, Eusebius Horton, esq.

Millford, G. H. Strutt, esq. Croxall, late Thomas Prinsep, esq. Newton Solney, Abraham Hoskins, esq. Darley, Walter Evans, esq.

Norton hall, Samuel Shore, jun'. esq. Duffield, John Balguy, esq.

Norton house, Jobn Read, esq. Dunston hall, Mrs. Smith.

Oaks, The, Sir W. C. Bagshaw, knt. Durant hall, A. B. Slater, esq.

Ogstone, William Turbutt, esq. Ednaston lodge, Hon. W. Shirley. Pastures, The, late John Peel, esq. Etwall, William Cotton, Esq.

Radborne, E. S. C. Pole, esq. Ford, Mrs. Holland.

Renishaw, Sir George Sitwell, bart. Foston, Charles Broadhurst, esq. Risley, Rev. John H. Hall. Glapwell, Thomas Hallowes, esq. Romeley, Rey. Thomas Hill. Glossop hall, Duke of Norfolk.

Shardelow, Leonard Fosbrooke, esq. Haddon hall, Duke of Rutland.

Smalley, John Radford, esq. Hasland, Thomas Lucas, esq.

Stainsby, E. S. Sitwell, esq. Hassop, Earl Newburgh.

Stanton Woodhouse, Duke of Rutland, Hathersage, A. A, Shuttleworth, esq. Stoke hall, Hon. John Simpson,

Stretton,

cross) are particularly curious. They pulpit, which may account for its precontain, under a sloping roof on the servation. Eastern side of the ailes, stone seats, The Church-yard contains the tomb or stalls, for the officiating priests; of Ambrose Searle, esq. autbor of three in each. In the side of each Horæ, Salutariæ,” and many other is a piscina, and by its side a cu works well known to the religious riously wrought niche of stone. world.

These ailes are now used as a Ce A fine old Gothic building, belongmetery. The oldest legible inscription ing to the Rectory, and called Parsonis 1641.

age-hall, is now used as a School-house. There is still preserved an old iron Broadwater is a lay impropriation helmet, supposed to bave been that vested in the College of Arundel, and of Lord De la Warr, and hung as a is a valuable living. The present extrophy on bis monument; it was af cellent Rector is the Rev. Peler terwards ingeniously converted into a Wood. He was presented to the poor’s-box, and fixed in front of the Rectory in 1811.

J. F.

COMPENDIUM OF COUNTY HISTORY.

crosses.

ADDITIONS TO DERBYSHIRE, Vol. LXXXVI. Part ii. p.

601.
“ Oh for a Shakspeare's pencil, while I trace

In Nature's breathing paint, the dreary waste
Of Buxton, dropping with incessant rains,
Cold and ungenial ; or its sweet reverse,
Enchanting Matlock, from whose rocks sublime
Romantic foliage hangs, and rills descend,
And Echo's murmur. Derwent, as he pours
His oft obstructed stream down rough cascades
And broken precipices, views with awe,
With rapture, the fair scenes his waters form."

WILLIAM WHITEHEAD, Poet Laureat.
ANTIENT STATE AND REMAINS.
Roman Stations. Ad Trivonam, Berry farm; Aquæ, Buxton; Luludarum,

Chesterfield. Antiquities, British, “ Cair's work,” or “ Carle's work,” rude fortification

on Hathersage moor.-Roman, Melacdra-castle camp; Altar at Haddunball: Inscribed pigs of lead found near Matlock.-Melbourne, Sandiacre aud Sleetley Churches, Ashover leaden font. Bakewell and Eyam

“Anchor church,” excavation in a rock near Foremark. Barlborough and Hardwick halls.

PRESENT STATE AND APPEARANCES. Rivers. Amber, Ashop, Barbrook, Burbadge, Crawley, Ecclesburn, Ethrow, Goyte, Gunoo, Headford, lbber, Idle, Lathkill or Larkill, Martin-brook,

Mersey, Morledge, Now, Schoo. Inland Navigation. Nutbrook canal. On the Cromford canal is a tunnel

(at Butterley) 2978 yards long; an aquæduct bridge over the Amber 200 yards long, and 50 feet high ; and another of the same length, and 30 feet high, over the Derwent. On Peak forest canal is an inclined plane of 512 yards, and an aquæduct bridge over the Mersey, 100 feet high, having 3

arches, each of 60 feet span. Eminences und Views. Holme-moss or Kinderscout 1859 feet; Axedge 1751

(erroneously stated at 2100 above Derby town); Lord's seat 1751; Hathersage 1377; Alport heights, 980. The High Tor in Matlock dale rises alnuost perpindicularly from the river above 300 feet, Bolsover Castle. Chats

worth hunting town. Naturul Curiosities. Groupe of grit-stone rocks called “Robin Hood's

Stride,” or “ Mock Beggar's ball,” on Stanton moor. Reynard's hall, a cáve in Dovedale, Elden hole was ascertaioed by John Lloyd, esq. to be a shaft of 62 yards deep, at the bottom of which are two caverns, as described by himn in Philosophical Transactions,” vol. 61.-Tepid springs, Buxton

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820, Matlock, 680, Stooy Middleton 630, Bakewell 600, Brough near Hope, Cromford, and Stoke. --Sulphureous, at Agnes and Mudge meadows, Bakewell; Bradwell, Brassington, Cowley near Dropfield, Kedleston, Koiveton, Millington Green near Kirk Ireton, Shottle in Duffield, Shuttlewood near Bolsover, West Hallam, Whittington, and near Wirksworth.—Chalybeate, most celebrated, at Asbover, Birley in Eckington, Bradley, Buxton, Chesterfield, two at Duffield, Eccleston in Youlgrave, Heage, Hope, near Kedleston, Matlock, Morley park, Quarndov, Shottle, Stanley, Tibabelf, and Whittington.-Saline, at Donisthorpe, and between Hope and Bradwell.—Ebbing and flowing, at Barmoor, and Tideswell.–At Overton, seat of Sir Joseph Banks, are two gooseberry trees, of the smooth red or Warrington sort, remarkably good bearers, the extreme length of one, measured in 1816, was 54 feet 7 inches; the other, which was planted in 1794, measured in 1808, 41 feet 5 inches.-At Bretby, the Earl of Chesterfield's, is a cedar of Lebanon, 13 feet 9 inches in circumference, planted in Feb. 1676-7, and is probably the oldest tree of its kind in this kingdom. The Enfield cedar was planted nearly at the same time; those in the Physic

garden at Chelsea, in 1683. Public Edifices. Ashborueschool founded 1585.—Burton upon Trent bridge will

be noticed in the Compendium of Staffordshire.-Buxton baths; crescent built by the late Duke of Devonshire in 1785 and 1786 ; Stables, a circular area of 60 yards internal diameter, with coach houses for 60 carriages.-Cavendish bridge, near Wilne, built by the Cavendish family about 1750.--Chesterfield town hall, erected 1790 ; architect, Carr.-Derby Alms-house, built by Elizabeth Countess of Shrewsbury, 1599: County hall erected in 1659 : All Saints church, architect Gibbs, finished 1725 : Guildhall 1731 : County gaol 1756: Theatre 1773: Assembly rooms 1774; Ordnance depôt, Wyatt architect, completed 1805: Infirmary, William Strutt, esq. architect, cost

£.30,000 opened 1810: Schools.Etwall Hospital.-Harrington bridge at
Sawley, begun 1786, finished 1790.—Measham town-hall. --Ravenstone
hospital, founded by Rebecca Wilkinson 1712.--Repton school.–Swark-
ston bridge, span over the river 138 yards, but its whole length over the
low groupds 1304 yards.

Seats. , Alfreton, Rev. H. C. Morewood..
Aldercar, Rev. John Smitb..

Highfield, V. H. Eyre, esq.
Allestrey, J. C. Girardot, esq.

Hilcote hall, John Wilkinson, esq.
Aston, Rev. Charles Holden.

Holme hall, Robert Birch,.esq.
Bank-hall, Samuel Frith, esq.

Holt house, George Mower, esq.
, Barlborough, C. H. Rodes, esq,

Hopwell, Thomas Pares, esq.
Barrow, John Beaumont, esq.

Ingleby, R. C. Greaves, esq.
Barton Blount, Francis Bradshaw, esq. Langley park, Godfrey Meynell, esq.
Beauchief Abbey, P. P. Burnell, esq. Leam, M. M. Middleton, esq.
Bolsover, Duke of Portland.

Little Longsdon, James Longsdon, esq.
Bradley, Godfrey Meynell, esq.

Little Over, Bache Heathcote, esq.
Breadsall priory, Mrs. Darwin.

Mearsbrook, Samuel Shore, esq.
Bridge-end, J. B. Strutt, esq.

Measham-field, Edward Abney, esq.
Castle field, John Burrow, esq.

Mellor, Samuel Oldknow, esq.
Catton, Eusebius Horton, esq.

Millford, G. H. Strutt, esq.
Croxall, late Thomas Prinsep, esq. Newton Solney, Abraham Hoskins, esq.
Darley, Walter Evans, esq.

Norton hall, Samuel Shore, jun'. esq.
Duffield, John Balguy, esq.

Norton house, Jobn Read, esq.
Dunston hall, Mrs. Smith.

Oaks, The, Sir W. C. Bagshaw, knt.
Durant ball, A. B. Slater, esq.

Ogstone, William Turbutt, esq.
Ednaston lodge, Hon. W. Shirley. Pastures, The, late John Peel, esq.
Etwall, William Cotton, Esq.

Radborne, E. S. C. Pole, esq.
Ford, Mrs. Holland.

Renishaw, Sir George Sitwell, bart.
Foston, Charles Broadhurst, esq. Risley, Rev. John H. Hall.
Glapwell, Thomas Hallowes, esq. Romeley, Rey. Thomas Hill.
Glossop hall, Duke of Norfolk.

Shardelow, Leonard Fosbrooke, esq.
Haddon hall, Duke of Rutland.

Smalley, John Radford, esq.
Hasland, Thomas Lucas, esq.

Stainsby, E. S. Sitwell, esq.
Hassop, Earl Newburgh.

Stanton Woodhouse, Duke of Rutland,
Hathersage, A. A, Shuttleworth,.esq. Stoke hall, Hon, John Simpson.

Stretton,

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Stretton, Sir Wm. Cave Browne, bart. Tupton, W. A. Lord, esq.
Stubbings, C. D. Gladwin, esq.

Walton, Colonel Disbrowệ.
Sutton, Marquess of Ormond.

Walton-lodge, Joshua Jebb, esq. Swarkston, Sir Henry Crewe, bart. Wheat-hills, Richard Bateman, esq. Tapton grove, Avery Jebb, esq.

Winfield, South, Winfield Halton, esq. Thurlston, Samuel Fox, esq.

Wirksworth.gate-house, Philip Gell, esq. Peerage. Chesterfield earldom to Staphope : Harlington marquessate to Cavendish Duke of Devonshire, who is also Baron Cavendish of Hardwick, Melbourne Irish viscounts and barony, and barony of the United kingdom to Lamb: Scarsdale (hundred) barony to Curzon.-Of Elvaston, Stanhope barony to Stanhope Earl Stanhope.--Of Haddon, Manners barony to Man.

bers Duke of Rutland. Produce. Free-stone; grind-stones, whet-stones, manganese, crystals called

“ Buxton diamonds;" cheese ; valerian ; elicampane. Manufactures. Porcelain; ale; worsted ; blankets; linen ; leather ; shoes ;

bats ; agricultural tools ; chains; nails; needles ; spurs and bridle bits.-
The first successful attempt lo establish the manufacture of calicoes in this
kingdom was made at Derby by Mr. Jedediah Strult, Mr. (afterwards Sir
Richard) Arkwrigbt, and Mr. Samuel Need. The machine for making
ribbed stockings was invented by Mr. Jedediah Strutt, about the year 1755.
The porcelain maoufactory was established at Derby by Mr. Duesbury
about 1750. The marble works near Bakewell, were first established by
Mr. Henry Watson, who first formed into ornaments the fluor spar or “ Blue
John” of this county. The first vase made of it (in 1743) is preserved in
the Museum of his nephew Mr. White Watson, of Bakewell.

POPULATION.
Places haviog not less than 1000 inhabitants.
Houses. Inbab.

Houses. Inhab.
Glossop....
735 4012 Measham

256 1525 Ilkeston.

613 2970 Ripley in Pentrich parish .. 258 1439 Eckington.

619 2889 Great Hamlet, Phoside and Asbover

467 2377 Kinder, in Glossop parish 249 1286 Brampton. 460 2260 Bonsall....

295 1278 Heanor..

353 1912 Heage, in Duffield parisb. .. 237 1210 Duffield. 367 1882 Sbirland.

268

1197 Crich.. 373 1828 Ticknall.

251 1166 Staveley

386 1793 Codnor and Loscow in HeaMelbor 284 1760 nor parish .

214 Reptun

326 1648 Bradwell, in Hope parish 260 . 1074 Norton 1527 Eyam .

224 1000 Total : Places 22; Houses 7,800 ; Inhabitants 39,136.

HISTORY. 942. Derby (which with the towns of Leicester, Lincoln, Stamford and Not

tingham, had been restored to the Danes, thence denominated “ Fif

Burghers”), taken by Edmund. 1215. Bolsover and Peak castles, taken froni the Barons in armis against

Kiog John, by William de Ferrars, Earl of Derby. 1569. The Shrievalty of this county disjoined from that of Nottinghamshire. 1642. August, Charles I. marched to Derby, after raising bis standard at

Nottingham agaiost the Parliamentarians. November, Royalists driven from Wirksworth and the Peak by Sir Jobo Gell, who shortly afterwards took Bretby-house, which had been fortified by its owner, the Earl of Chesterfield, for the King. 1643. January, at Swarkston-bridge, Royalists under Colonel Hastings

driveo from their intrenchments, and Swark stonhouse, Sir John Harpur's, taken by Sir Joho Gill. April, Sutton-bouse, defended by its owner Lord Deincourt for the King, taken by Colonel Thomas Gell, brother of Sir Jobn. December, South Winfield manor-house garrisoned by the Parliamentarians, afler three days siege, stormed by the Earl (afterwards Duke)

of Newcastle. 1644. February, near Asbborne, Royalists defeated, and 170 taken prisoners

by the Parliamentariaos.--March, oo Eggiatod-heath, Rogalisis defeated by a detachment from Sir John Gell's army, com mauded by Major Molanus

and

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and Captaiu Rodes.- August 20, South Winfield manor house, after a siege of above a month by the Parliamentariaos, under the Earl of Denbigh, Lord Grey of Groby, and Sir John Gell (during which the Royalist Governor, Colonel Dalby, was slain, and Colonel Hastings repulsed in an effort to relieve it) surrendered by Sir Johu Fitzherbert to Sir Jobu Gell.--August, Staveley-house and Bolsover-castle taken by the Parliamentarians under

Major-General Crawford. 1645. August, at Sudbury and at Ashborne, Sir Jobo Gell defeated in

skirmishes with Charles I.-September and October, Chatsworth under its Royalist Governor, Colonel Shalcross, successively defended against Colonel

Moianus and the Parliamentarians. 1659. At Derby an insurrection against Richard Cromwell. 1817. At South Winfield, June 9, commenced a miserable insurrection to

overthrow the constitution. The insurgents proceeded towards Nottingham, but near that town were specdily dispersed by the inilitary, and three of the ring leaders, Jereiniah Brandreth, William Turner, and Isaac Ludlain, were executed at Derby, Nov. 7. (To be continued.)

THE

REMARKS ON THE SIGNS OF INNS, &C. The hair is manufactured into the

( Continued from Part i. p. 512.) whitest wigs. The suet is much suTHE Goat.-This is not an un perior to that of the ox or sheep for

common sign, though Cary making candles. The milk is sweet, mentions only one posting-house, nourishing, and considered very be. viz. at Woburn in Bedfordshire, thus neficial in consumptive cases, which distinguished; and there it was doubta is not surprising, as the goat browzes less adopted by the landlord from its only on the tops, tendrils, and flow. being the crest of the Duke of Bed. ers, of the mountain shrubs, aud meford, whose principal seat is at Wo dicinal herbs, rejecting the grosser barn Abbey.

parts. The blood was formerly thought The Welsh goats are much supe. useful in pleurisy, and is noticed by rior in size, and in the length and Dr. Mead. The “gall of goat” is fineness of their hair, to those of anyong the ingredients of the witches' other mountainous countries. The cauldron in Shakspeare's “Macbeth." borns of one, measured by Pennant, Capricorous, or the goat, was were 3 feet 2 inches long, and 3 feet adopted as a sign of the Zodiac, from from tip to tip. They climb up the the circumstance of the Sun having most rugged rocks, and ascend the just reached the winter solstice, or most dangerous places, with amazing its greatest declination, and this aniswistuess and safety; and when two mal, from its propensity to cliunbing, are yoked together, as is frequently was considered typical of the sun's practised, they will, as if by consent, ascent, and its horns, according to take large and hazardous leaps ; yet ancient hyeroglyphics, were the emso well time their mutual efforts, as blems of the heat consequent on such rarely lo miscarry in the attempt. ascension. Their strong ungrateful odour is sup Wild goose chase, a well-kuown posed to be useful in preventing dis Term for a difficult pursuit, and ihe ease among horses, on which account title of one of Beauniont and Fletch. we frequently see them in ion stables. er's best comedies, I once thought to They seldom live more than 11 or 12 have been probably a corruption of years.

Wild goat's chase, as the hunting of The meat of a splayed goal, of six the latter animal, being particularly or seven years old, is considered the difficult and dangerous from its acbest, being generally very sweet and tivity in leaping from crag to crag, fat, and makes excellent pastries, lit. appeared more appropriately to illustle inferior to venison. The haunches trate the meaning of ihe phrase ; but are often salted and dried, and supply it appears to have originally desig all the uses of bacon. The horns nated a sort of horse-race, and the make remarkably good handles for name was probably derived from knives. The skin is used for pistol. wild geese flying a great height, preholsters, and soldier's knapsacks; that serving great regularity in their moof the kid makes admirable gloves. tion, and frequently forming astraight

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