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At her approach, fee Hope, fee Fear,

See Expectation fly!
And Disappointment in the rear,

That blafts the purpos'd joy.

The tears, which Pity taught to flow,

My eyes shall then disown;
The heart, that throbb’d at others woe,

Shall then scarce feel its own.

The wounds, which now each moment bleed,

Each moment then shall close; And tranquil days shall still succeed

To nights of sweet repose,

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So may the glow-worms glimmering light,

Thy tiny footsteps lead
To some new region of delight,

Unknown to mortal tread !

And be thy acorn goblet fillid

With heavens ambrosial dew,
From sweeteft, fresheft flowers diftill'd,

That shed fresh sweets for you.

And

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When mortals are at rest,
And snoring in their neft ;
Unheard and unespied,

Through key-holes we do glide ;
Over tables, ftools, and shelves,
We trip it with our Fairy elves.

And if the houfe be foul,
With platter, dish, or bowl,
Up ftairs we nimbly creep,

And find the flats alleep;
Then we pinch their arms and thighs ;
None us hears, and none us spies.

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The brains of nightingales,
With unctuous fat of snails,
Between two cockles stew'd,

Is meat that's eas'ly chew'd;
Tails of worms and marrow of mice,
Do make a dish that's wondrous nice.

The grasshopper, gnat, and Ay,
Serve for our minstrelsy;
Grace said, we dance awhile,

And so the time beguile:
And if the moon doth hide her head,
The glow-worm lights us home to bed.

O'er

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O'er tops of dewy grass
So nimbly we do país,
The
young

and tender stalk
Ne'er bends where we do walk;
Yet in the morning may be seen
Where we the night before have been.

o.

SONG LVI.

IMITATED FROM THE MIDSUMMER-NIGHTS DREAM OF

SHAKSPEARE. ACT II. SCENE V.

L

,

0! here, beneath this hallow'd shade,

Within a cow slips blossom deep,
The lovely Queen of Elves is laid,

May nought disturb her balmy sleep!

Let not the snake, or baleful toad

Approach the filent manfion near,
Or newt profane the sweet abode,

Or owl repeat her orgies here!

No snail or worm shall hither come,

With noxious filth her bow'r to stain ;
Hence be the beetles fullen hum,

And spiders disemboweld train.

The love-lorn nightingale alone

Shall through Titanias arbour stray,
To sooth her sleep with melting moan,

And lull her with his sweetest lay.

SONG

SONG LVII.

THE MAD MERRY PRANKS OF ROBIN GOOD-FELLOW.

F

ROM Oberon, in Fairy-land,

The king of ghosts and shadows there,
Mad Robin I, at his command,
Am sent to view the night-sports here ;

What revel rout

Is kept about,
In every corner where I go,

I will o'er see,

And merry be,
And make good sport, with ho, ho, ho !

More swift than lightning can I fly

About this airy welkin foon,
And, in a minutes space, descry
Each thing that's done below the moon.

There's not a hag,

Nor ghost shall wag,
Nor cry, Goblin ! where I do go ;

But Robin I

Their feats will spy,
And fear them home, with ho, ho, ho!

If
any

wanderers I meet,
That from their night-sport do trudge home;
With counterfeiting voice I greet,
And cause them on with me to roam,

Through

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