Графични страници
PDF файл
ePub

noneers.

“ An equal number of men in the entrenchments at Fort Kehl, stopped, for two months, a numerous and vi&torious army, better skilled in war than the English, and provided with able engineers, good besieging artillery, and expert can

The English have no right to flatter themselves with the idea of carrying the entrenchments lined with 10,000 French, accustomed to war, and a formidable artillery, at one and the first onset.

If once engaged in the delays of a fiege, incxperienced, without skilful generals, engineers, or ficge artillery, dreading the like invasions on other parts of the coast, which they durit not leave unprotected, the patriotic fire of the military will soon be quenched, expeoces will increase, trade will perish, bankruptcies, failures of payment, the confternation of the towns, of the country, and of manufacturers; especially the disaffection of the people, and the revolutionary spirit, will hasten disorder and confusion. Then, even before a defeat, the resource of the English will be a moft humiliating and dearly bought peace, in case the French, who have hitherto not possessed virtue enough to set limits to their victories, lave, at last, moderation cnough to consent to it.

« Let us suppose the most favourable thing for England, that the French be driven off in their first attempt: this will afsuredly not happen at the moment of landing. Every man, acquainted with common tactics, is assured that it is not possible to prevent a landing. If it takes place at all, it must be after the liege of their entrenchments, which will have been stormed, and themselves either put to the sword, or made prisoners. What is the loss of 10,000 men to France, when the reflects that it has coft England an equal number? She will re&ify her plans, and commence again.

“ Let us conclude then, Firt, That a descent, en safi, on England or Ireland, must be attended with infinite difficulties and inconveniencies; but that it is physically impoffible ; that an army, composed of 60 or 80,000 men, when once landed in England, may subfift without requiring to be vi&tualled by sea ; that the genius of the English nation, from the ascente dant which democracy is every where gaining, will meet with partizans and resources in a rich, abundant, and open country; that such an army is powerful enough to march to London, subdue England, level royalty to the dust, and change the conftitution.

" Secondly,

“ Secondly, That one or more partial descents are easier to accomplish, will-produce nearly the same effect, and form the advanced guard of the grand descent, by securing, in the fift place, a firm footing in the kingdom.

Thirdly, That all England is kept in alarm by the menace alone of this grand descent; that by fatiguing cruises, by arming the coasts, and a standing-army, it is ruined. And that during so long a period as France can continue to exhibit tbe phantom, England cannot support her present state of perplexity.

Fourthly, That the threat of a grand descent can only cease, either by a general warfare against France, which would draw the forces intended for this pruject, or, more properly, this phantom, elsewhere; or by an universal peace;- That one or the other must be decided at Ratstadt; and that thus the fate of England depends entirely on the result of negociations there.

“ Under the chapter on Derimark, we have proved that the interests of the maritime powers require, not only that the projected descent on England be unsuccessful, but that it wholly cease to exift. Such is the interest also of the continental powers. The general bankruptcy which would ensue, all the specie of Europe in the possession of an enemy, insatiable and uncontrolled, all the power both by land and sea united in it, would ser no bounds to that characteristic ambition and rapacity, which, it is well known, has ever increased in proportion to its success. The fall of every throne, the extinction of every civil, political and religious constitution, would be the fatal consequence. Democracy would devour all Europe, and, in the end, devour itself.”

Ellinor ; or, the World as it is. By Mary Ann Han. way. 4 vols.

185. Lane, 1798. IN the present state of literature, Ellinor is not desti

tute of attractions. She sees a little of life, is fomewhat Quixotic, but then ihe makes amends for all, by marrying a good, sensible old gentleman. Her companions are likewise interesting, and their adventures are amusingly tuld.

236
.... 238

P. 395

to..

P. 293

Page

Page
E.
Ode to Friendship.

235
Exhibition at Somerset House 57 His Ridicule..
Exhibition of Miss Linwood's 60 Judge Jefferies...
Epistle to a Friend.........R. 85 Jortin

240
Edwin...

......P. 184 Jewith Republic, a New, Let-
Epigram...

.P. 188

ter concerning the Eftablish-
Erasinus..

.68, 297
ment of...

383
Eternity

.P. 68
Ellen ...

K.
Ellinor, or the World as it is, R. 427 King's Birth-Day, Ode on, P. 181.
Education

68 Keith's View of Great Britain 210
King Witham III.

236
F.
King James II.

237
Friend in A Miction, Toa, P. 76 Kamtschatka, Ancient Natives
Fox, Hon. Cha. Epigram on, P. 84 of ....

282
Fenaie Indian, Account of.... 128 Knowledge, Ode to........P. 289
F.ddling.

136
Feeling, Essay on ... ....... 153

L.
Fine Arts...

00Lover, Unsuccessful Advice to 20

Literature, General Review of 62
G.

Linden, Mrs. Plan of Educa-
Gibbon, Curious Extracts from 18

tion.

.... R. 107
Genius, Efiay on............ 123 Little Family

............R. 216
Gam, Sir David..
344 Lambeth Church..

229
Gentleman, Epifle, Familiar, Luther..

240
· P. 397, 399 Love, On..
Gondalbert, a Fragment... 381 Lovers...

P. 290
Lines on the Death of Mr. John
H,

Careboult..
He's much to Blame, a Come. Landscape Painters

........ 58
dy
..R. 95 Lover's Death..

... 273
Howe, Earl of, Memoirs.... 109 Lioes to Lakenham... ...P. 300
Henderson, John, A. B...... 132 Lavater.
Honesty aud Generosity... 134 Lewis XIV.

349
History, Esay on

160 London...
Haymarket Theatre. 178, 286
Humanity

242

M.
Habit, on its Influence 277 Melancholy of Lovers..
Happiness..
166 Milton's Daughters....

14
Henry, Death of..

167 Moon, Journey to the..
Hifiorical Paintings.

57 Mantua, Duke of, his Country
Historical Works..
62 House..

30
Howard..

349 Masquerades...

Martial Ode for 1798.... P. 73
I. and J.
Matilda, Stanzas to..

P. 79
Inscription, Curious.......... 136 Myrtilla...

P. 84
Innocence, Eray on... 338 Moon, Journey to, concluded 142
Iinposture...

343 Maria,Stanzas near herGrave, P. 183
Johnson, Dr....
16 | Music, Ode to..

P. 188
His Marriage.
134 Maidstone Theatre

288
His Meditations on a Pud.
ding.

MariaLamenting, Stanzas to, P. 291
...... 135 Miniatures

Madness

P. 299

.... 346

P. 393

[ocr errors]

58

on

R. 93

.P. 191

R. 316

Page

Page
Madness..
170 Revenge..

340
Malvern Hills ..

3211
Mary's Character..

35

S.
Malta, Short Account of .. 370 Smith, Sir Sydney, Memoirs of

Sterne

15
N
Jatire, An Enay on

52
Naucratia ; or Naval Domini- Smollet, Dr. Character of.. 69
R. 87 Sadler's Wells ..

72
Night, Sonnet to

P. 189 Sonnet to S.W at Hertford, P. 75
Novels, Reading of

242 Schoolfellow, Elegy on....P. 78
Natural Philosophy.

05 Stranger, a Comedy
Novels..
67 Suetonius

138
Nero, Emperor.

344 Smith, Adam, L.L D. Charac-
Nightingale

396
ter of..

139
olar Sylemn, Sketch of 158
0.
Singular Character.

173
Orford, Lord, his detached Shipwreck..
Thoughts...

131,233
Sounet to the Muse..

P. 298
Ditto's Whole Works ....R. 103 Shipwreck of the Juno.
O'Conner, &c. Trial of....R. 215

Stom...

40
Occurences, strange, by Lord Sensibility

43
Orford...

357 Shipwreck, Sad Account ..... 272
Orford, Lord, his GeneralCriti- Smirke's Seven Ages.

59
cism on Dr. Johnson's Writ-

Sea Pieces....

ib,
ings
:301 Sense, Common

343
Sneezing

ib.
P.
Philip V. of Çaftile...

17

T.
Public Men, Anecdotes of 54, 156, Taste, Efay on...

227
267 Tillotson, Archbishop....237, 241
Passion

134 | Theodore, King of Corsica.... 342
Plant, Curious..

177
Peace, Invocation to...... P. 189

U.
Paul's Cathedral..

238 Unanimity against the French
Pole, Cardinal.
240 Invasion....

49
Pope Leo Ath.

241
Poetry, Modern Strictures on 259

V.
Portraits
58 Vauxhall.

72
Picture, Exquisite, of Our Sa- Virginity,Antiquated,Ode to P 77
viour.

61 Vifiting the Tomb of a dear
Political Productions.
63 Friend...

P. 187
Poetry

66 Visit to my Native Village.... 170
Peter the I hird of Caftile. 345 Visit to Versailles..

275
Peace..
.P. 401 Views

59
Punishment, Singular.. .... 346 Voyages and Travels..
Philosopher, Indian

64

347 Vincent, Lord, Character of 325
Pennant's London abridged, R. 415

W.
R.
Warburton, Bishop...

15
Rondale and Alma.. P. 81 Woolstonecraft, Mrs. Beauties
Retrospection..

of..

.....35, 166, 270, 373
Religion....
.................. 172
Wooden Leg..

45
Wolley,

P. 190

Page

Page
Wolsey, Cardinal.

241 Young, John, Extraordinary
Women, Appeal in Behalf of, R. 308 Execution of..

246
Wardle, Mr. on his Death, P. 401 | Young Lady, Letter to, on the
Walk through Wales..... 406 Improvement of her Mind 354
Walton's Complete Angler...' 371

Z

Zephyr, Ode to.

.P. 294

Youth's Miscellany ........R. 215

DIRECTIONS TO THE BINDER

FOR PLACING THE ENGRAVINGS.

Page

The Portrait of Sir William Sydney Smith, to face

Earl Howe.
Lurd Viscount Duncan
Lord St. Vincent .

5
JO9

217
• 325

« ПредишнаНапред »